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Mount Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): article 2
eached the city about nine o'clock, reported that all the batteries were working admirably; that no one was injured, and that the men were wild with enthusiasm. A short time after that happy news was received, the schooner Petril, from Hog Island Channel, reported that the shot from Stevens' Iron Battery had told upon the walls of Fort Sumter. And also that Fort Moultrie had sustained no damage. About half-past 9 o'clock, Captain R. S. Parker reported from Sullivan's Island to Mount Pleasant that everything was in fine condition at Fort Moultrie, and that the soldiers had escaped unhurt. The same dispatch stated that the embrasures of the Floating Battery were undamaged by the shock of the shot, and though that formidable structure had been struck eleven times, the balls had not started a single bolt. Anderson had concentrated his fire upon the Floating Battery, and the Dahlgren Battery, under command of Lieutenant Hamilton. A number of shells had dropped into Fort Sum
Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
ril, from Hog Island Channel, reported that the shot from Stevens' Iron Battery had told upon the walls of Fort Sumter. And also that Fort Moultrie had sustained no damage. About half-past 9 o'clock, Captain R. S. Parker reported from Sullivan's Island to Mount Pleasant that everything was in fine condition at Fort Moultrie, and that the soldiers had escaped unhurt. The same dispatch stated that the embrasures of the Floating Battery were undamaged by the shock of the shot, and thoughryor, the eloquent young Virginian, in the execution of that dangerous commission, passed within speaking distance of the angry and hostile fortress. Despite the fierce and concentrated fire from Fort Sumter, the rival fortification on Sullivan's Island received but slight damage. Its Merlons stood unmoved, and are this morning in as good a condition as they were before their strength was tested by the rude shocks of the shot. The Floating Battery came out of the iron storm without lo
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
y both sides up to seven o'clock, the hour at which Fort Sumter ceased firing. He gives as a total 75,000 pounds, or over thirty-six tons of iron. It was currently rumored that the Harriet Lane was crippled by the Star of the West Battery, while trying to run in yesterday morning, but that the Harriet Lane pursued the course of her predecessor, and put back to sea minus one wheel. The Courier contains this significant paragraph: If there are any among us who yet consider South Carolina not in earnest, or in the right, it is full time they seek safety in a more congenial climate. Those who are not for us are against us, and we shall and can take care of ourselves. Further accounts. The following are extracts from dispatches dated Charleston, Friday: The soldiers are perfectly reckless of their lives, and at every shot jump upon the ramparts, and then jump down cheering. A party on the Stevens' Battery are said to have played a game of cards durin
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
es, watching the white smoke as it rose in wreaths upon the soft twilight air, and breathing our fervent prayers for their gallant kinsfolk at the guns. O! what a conflict raged in those heaving bosoms between love for husbands and sons, and love for our common mother, whose insulted honor and imperiled safety had called her faithful children to the ensanguined field. At thirty minutes past four o'clock the conflict was opened by the discharge of a shell from the Howitzer Battery on James Island, under the command of Capt. Geo. S. James, who followed the riddled Palmetto banner on the bloody battle fields of Mexico. The sending of this harmful messenger to Major Anderson was followed by a deafening explosion, which was caused by the blowing up of a building that stood in front of the battery. While the white smoke was melting away into the air another shell, which Lieut. W. Hampton Gibbes has the honor of having fired, pursued its noiseless way toward the hostile fortifi
Jasper, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 2
tators of the great drama. Never before had such crowds of ladies without attendants visited our thoroughfares. Business was entirely suspended. The stores on King street, Meeting street and East Bay were all closed. Dr. Salters, the "Jasper" correspondent of the New York Times, was arrested, and locked up in the Guard House, where he yet remains. One of our special reporters to Fort Moultrie brought a trophy of the war, in the shape of a 32-pound ball, which Anderson had fired st struggles, but they looked defiance at the vessels of war, whose men, like cowards, stood outside without firing a gun, or attempting to divert the fire of a single battery from Sumter. Five of Major Anderson's men are slightly wounded. Jasper, the correspondent of the New York Times, who was arrested as a spy, was confined for a time, and then ordered out of the State. He was taken as far as Wilmington, N. C., and is now on his way North. A special dispatch from Charleston to th
United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
urnish detailed accounts of the opening of the first engagement between the United and the Confederate States. Our own correspondence gives later intelligence, but with a view to gratify the public dx and seven o'clock, when, as if wrathful from enforced delay, from casemate and parapet the United States officer poured a storm of iron hail upon Fort Moultrie, Stevens' Iron Battery and the Floatitidings were brought to the city by Col. Edmund Yates, Acting Lieutenant to Dozier, of the Confederate States Navy, from Fort Johnson. Stevens' Battery and the Floating Battery are doing important ser We dare not close this brief and hurried narrative of the first engagement between the United States and the Confederate States, without returning thanks to Almighty God for the great success tConfederate States, without returning thanks to Almighty God for the great success that has thus far crowned our arms, and for the extraordinary preservation of our soldiers from casualty and death. In the fifteen hours of almost incessant firing, our enemy one of the most experienc
Cumming's Point (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
hen took up the tale of death, and in a moment the guns from the redoubtable Gun Battery on Cummings' Point, from Captain McCready's Battery, from Capt. James Hamilton's Floating Battery, the Enfiladuse the remaining ones. The Howitzer Battery connected with the impregnable Gun Battery at Cummings' Point, is managed with consummate skill and terrible effect. Eleven o'clock.--A messenger frris' Island brings the glorious news that the shot glance from the iron-covered battery, at Cummings' Point, like marbles thrown by a child on the back of a turtle. The upper portion of the Southwes, confirms the cheerful news. Twelve o'clock.--We have just learned by an arrival from Cummings' Point, that the batteries there are doing good service--Stevens' Battery very successful. Not a , at the time, he had the office of directing. The famous iron batteries — the one at Cummings' Point — named for Mr. C. H. Stevens, the inventor, and the celebrated Floating Battery, construct
Palmetto (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 2
and breathing our fervent prayers for their gallant kinsfolk at the guns. O! what a conflict raged in those heaving bosoms between love for husbands and sons, and love for our common mother, whose insulted honor and imperiled safety had called her faithful children to the ensanguined field. At thirty minutes past four o'clock the conflict was opened by the discharge of a shell from the Howitzer Battery on James Island, under the command of Capt. Geo. S. James, who followed the riddled Palmetto banner on the bloody battle fields of Mexico. The sending of this harmful messenger to Major Anderson was followed by a deafening explosion, which was caused by the blowing up of a building that stood in front of the battery. While the white smoke was melting away into the air another shell, which Lieut. W. Hampton Gibbes has the honor of having fired, pursued its noiseless way toward the hostile fortification. The honored missive described its beautiful curve through the balmy
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 2
llant kinsfolk at the guns. O! what a conflict raged in those heaving bosoms between love for husbands and sons, and love for our common mother, whose insulted honor and imperiled safety had called her faithful children to the ensanguined field. At thirty minutes past four o'clock the conflict was opened by the discharge of a shell from the Howitzer Battery on James Island, under the command of Capt. Geo. S. James, who followed the riddled Palmetto banner on the bloody battle fields of Mexico. The sending of this harmful messenger to Major Anderson was followed by a deafening explosion, which was caused by the blowing up of a building that stood in front of the battery. While the white smoke was melting away into the air another shell, which Lieut. W. Hampton Gibbes has the honor of having fired, pursued its noiseless way toward the hostile fortification. The honored missive described its beautiful curve through the balmy air, and falling within the hostile fortress,
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
ed its deadly contents in all directions. Fort Moultrie then took up the tale of death, and in a manced harmless from the stuccoed bricks of Fort Moultrie. The embrasures of the hostile fortress gs officer poured a storm of iron hail upon Fort Moultrie, Stevens' Iron Battery and the Floating Ban the walls of Fort Sumter. And also that Fort Moultrie had sustained no damage. About half-pt that everything was in fine condition at Fort Moultrie, and that the soldiers had escaped unhurt.e following report: Captain Parker visited Fort Moultrie and the Enfilading Battery near by, and foffords us infinite pleasure to record that Fort Moultrie has fully sustained the prestige of its glantage was unquestionably upon the side of Fort Moultrie. In that fort not a gun was dismounted, nany of its defences, while every ball from Fort Moultrie left its mark upon Fort Sumter.--Many of iains. One of our special reporters to Fort Moultrie brought a trophy of the war, in the shape [1 more...]
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