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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 27, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
From the Northwest.[Special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Pruntytown, Taylor Co., Va., April 21st, 1861. Union sentiments are rapidly dying away all over this portion of Northwestern Virginia, and the people are becoming one in sympathy, one in desire, and one in heart, with a rapidity which is as astonishing as it is gratifying. I am not writing for sensation purposes, as I have certainly no desire to deceive any one. I am speaking facts, as I know them to exist, and as I have lh two or three, and more if found necessary. I see by the public papers that Major Geo. W. Hansbrough, of this town, and Capt. John A. Robinson, of Fetterman, are each engaged in raising a company. Major Hansbrough came to this county from Eastern Virginia nearly six years ago. He possesses a fine classical education, (a graduate of the Virginia University,) and is a lawyer of ability and promise. He is a whole-souled Virginia, full of patriotism, full of fire and full of courage. For severa
Taylor (Iowa, United States) (search for this): article 2
ooperating heartily with the Secession party, (Thank God for this change in their feelings.) A very sensible gentleman, who knows the people generally in our county, assured me this morning that at least one hundred changes had taken place in Taylor county during the past week. Instead of the news of the secession of our State having strengthened the Union party--as some false prophets had declared it would do — it bids fair to break them down, or break them up, whichever you prefer. In Mining this,) it has been asserted by intelligent persons that the Secession ticket will prevail by a majority of 1,000, if there should be time to submit it to the people. Volunteer companies are being raised with most commendable zeal. Taylor county will furnish two or three, and more if found necessary. I see by the public papers that Major Geo. W. Hansbrough, of this town, and Capt. John A. Robinson, of Fetterman, are each engaged in raising a company. Major Hansbrough came to this c
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
a, full of patriotism, full of fire and full of courage. For several months past he has scarcely been able to restrain his inclination to abandon his profession, hasten away from the endearments of an interesting family, and fly to the aid of the seceded States. Capt. Robinson is also a good man, and an unwavering patriot. Both of these gentlemen, if called into service, will make their mark, so far as skill, bravery and courage are concerned. But we have hundreds of good men in Western Virginia, and the patriotic fire is spreading among them like "the fire in the mountains." Had you, Messrs. Editors, been intimately and thoroughly acquainted with our people six months ago, and were you now to visit us, you would be astonished at the change in sentiment. The Unionists are dispirited, mortified, alarmed, chagrined, amazed. They know not what to do. They look like a whipped child, while their ranks are being rapidly thinned, and the ranks of the State-Rights or Patriotic P
Fetterman (search for this): article 2
hem down, or break them up, whichever you prefer. In Marion county, (adjoining this,) it has been asserted by intelligent persons that the Secession ticket will prevail by a majority of 1,000, if there should be time to submit it to the people. Volunteer companies are being raised with most commendable zeal. Taylor county will furnish two or three, and more if found necessary. I see by the public papers that Major Geo. W. Hansbrough, of this town, and Capt. John A. Robinson, of Fetterman, are each engaged in raising a company. Major Hansbrough came to this county from Eastern Virginia nearly six years ago. He possesses a fine classical education, (a graduate of the Virginia University,) and is a lawyer of ability and promise. He is a whole-souled Virginia, full of patriotism, full of fire and full of courage. For several months past he has scarcely been able to restrain his inclination to abandon his profession, hasten away from the endearments of an interesting family,
John C. Bell (search for this): article 2
ents are rapidly dying away all over this portion of Northwestern Virginia, and the people are becoming one in sympathy, one in desire, and one in heart, with a rapidity which is as astonishing as it is gratifying. I am not writing for sensation purposes, as I have certainly no desire to deceive any one. I am speaking facts, as I know them to exist, and as I have learned them from reliable and intelligent sources. A number of men, in this immediate vicinity, who voted for either Douglas or Bell, and who have been Union men all along, are now cooperating heartily with the Secession party, (Thank God for this change in their feelings.) A very sensible gentleman, who knows the people generally in our county, assured me this morning that at least one hundred changes had taken place in Taylor county during the past week. Instead of the news of the secession of our State having strengthened the Union party--as some false prophets had declared it would do — it bids fair to break them down
on sentiments are rapidly dying away all over this portion of Northwestern Virginia, and the people are becoming one in sympathy, one in desire, and one in heart, with a rapidity which is as astonishing as it is gratifying. I am not writing for sensation purposes, as I have certainly no desire to deceive any one. I am speaking facts, as I know them to exist, and as I have learned them from reliable and intelligent sources. A number of men, in this immediate vicinity, who voted for either Douglas or Bell, and who have been Union men all along, are now cooperating heartily with the Secession party, (Thank God for this change in their feelings.) A very sensible gentleman, who knows the people generally in our county, assured me this morning that at least one hundred changes had taken place in Taylor county during the past week. Instead of the news of the secession of our State having strengthened the Union party--as some false prophets had declared it would do — it bids fair to break
John A. Robinson (search for this): article 2
it it to the people. Volunteer companies are being raised with most commendable zeal. Taylor county will furnish two or three, and more if found necessary. I see by the public papers that Major Geo. W. Hansbrough, of this town, and Capt. John A. Robinson, of Fetterman, are each engaged in raising a company. Major Hansbrough came to this county from Eastern Virginia nearly six years ago. He possesses a fine classical education, (a graduate of the Virginia University,) and is a lawyer of a full of fire and full of courage. For several months past he has scarcely been able to restrain his inclination to abandon his profession, hasten away from the endearments of an interesting family, and fly to the aid of the seceded States. Capt. Robinson is also a good man, and an unwavering patriot. Both of these gentlemen, if called into service, will make their mark, so far as skill, bravery and courage are concerned. But we have hundreds of good men in Western Virginia, and the patr
George W. Hansbrough (search for this): article 2
y of 1,000, if there should be time to submit it to the people. Volunteer companies are being raised with most commendable zeal. Taylor county will furnish two or three, and more if found necessary. I see by the public papers that Major Geo. W. Hansbrough, of this town, and Capt. John A. Robinson, of Fetterman, are each engaged in raising a company. Major Hansbrough came to this county from Eastern Virginia nearly six years ago. He possesses a fine classical education, (a graduate of theMajor Hansbrough came to this county from Eastern Virginia nearly six years ago. He possesses a fine classical education, (a graduate of the Virginia University,) and is a lawyer of ability and promise. He is a whole-souled Virginia, full of patriotism, full of fire and full of courage. For several months past he has scarcely been able to restrain his inclination to abandon his profession, hasten away from the endearments of an interesting family, and fly to the aid of the seceded States. Capt. Robinson is also a good man, and an unwavering patriot. Both of these gentlemen, if called into service, will make their mark, so far as
. For several months past he has scarcely been able to restrain his inclination to abandon his profession, hasten away from the endearments of an interesting family, and fly to the aid of the seceded States. Capt. Robinson is also a good man, and an unwavering patriot. Both of these gentlemen, if called into service, will make their mark, so far as skill, bravery and courage are concerned. But we have hundreds of good men in Western Virginia, and the patriotic fire is spreading among them like "the fire in the mountains." Had you, Messrs. Editors, been intimately and thoroughly acquainted with our people six months ago, and were you now to visit us, you would be astonished at the change in sentiment. The Unionists are dispirited, mortified, alarmed, chagrined, amazed. They know not what to do. They look like a whipped child, while their ranks are being rapidly thinned, and the ranks of the State-Rights or Patriotic Party are being as rapidly augmented. More Anon.
April 21st, 1861 AD (search for this): article 2
From the Northwest.[Special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Pruntytown, Taylor Co., Va., April 21st, 1861. Union sentiments are rapidly dying away all over this portion of Northwestern Virginia, and the people are becoming one in sympathy, one in desire, and one in heart, with a rapidity which is as astonishing as it is gratifying. I am not writing for sensation purposes, as I have certainly no desire to deceive any one. I am speaking facts, as I know them to exist, and as I have learned them from reliable and intelligent sources. A number of men, in this immediate vicinity, who voted for either Douglas or Bell, and who have been Union men all along, are now cooperating heartily with the Secession party, (Thank God for this change in their feelings.) A very sensible gentleman, who knows the people generally in our county, assured me this morning that at least one hundred changes had taken place in Taylor county during the past week. Instead of the news of the secession