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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Aden (New York, United States) (search for this): article 16
Ripley, were invited to dine with the Prime Minister and all the high Princes of the Empire. They then went to Yokohama, 12 miles below Jeddo, where the men were allowed to go ashore. They left Japan on the 28th of November for Hong Kong, and made one of the shortest passages on record, occupying only seven and a half days, and one day making over 312 miles, under sail alone. After taking in coal and water, they took Mr. Ward on board, and after touching at Singapore, proceeded to Aden, on the Arabian coast of the Red Sea, where they stayed a week for Mr. Ward to take a steamer. While lying here, they got the news of the election in the United States, and of the secession feeling at the South. No State had seceded at their latest advices there, but it was believed that South Carolina would certainly go, and perhaps be joined by other States. They then went to Cape Town, and had a very boisterous passage through the Mozambique channel. They arrived there on the 2
Jeddo (New York, United States) (search for this): article 16
eeded to Loango, on the coast of Africa. From there they made a stretch to Batavia, on the island of Java, the trip occupying 44 days. They remained there ten days, and then proceeded to Hong Kong. From there they went to Japan, arriving at Jeddo November 9. They were received there with much ceremony, very courteously treated, and the Captain and eight of the officers, with Col. Ripley, were invited to dine with the Prime Minister and all the high Princes of the Empire. They then went to Yokohama, 12 miles below Jeddo, where the men were allowed to go ashore. They left Japan on the 28th of November for Hong Kong, and made one of the shortest passages on record, occupying only seven and a half days, and one day making over 312 miles, under sail alone. After taking in coal and water, they took Mr. Ward on board, and after touching at Singapore, proceeded to Aden, on the Arabian coast of the Red Sea, where they stayed a week for Mr. Ward to take a steamer. Wh
Cape Town (South Africa) (search for this): article 16
ing in coal and water, they took Mr. Ward on board, and after touching at Singapore, proceeded to Aden, on the Arabian coast of the Red Sea, where they stayed a week for Mr. Ward to take a steamer. While lying here, they got the news of the election in the United States, and of the secession feeling at the South. No State had seceded at their latest advices there, but it was believed that South Carolina would certainly go, and perhaps be joined by other States. They then went to Cape Town, and had a very boisterous passage through the Mozambique channel. They arrived there on the 2d of February, and here got ten days later news from the United States, but the secession of the Cotton States was not then considered certain. They remained there a week, caulking the ship and making some repairs, after which she was thrown open to the public, and several thousands visited her. Several entertainments were given on board. On the 8th of March they sailed for this port, a
Yokohama (Japan) (search for this): article 16
oango, on the coast of Africa. From there they made a stretch to Batavia, on the island of Java, the trip occupying 44 days. They remained there ten days, and then proceeded to Hong Kong. From there they went to Japan, arriving at Jeddo November 9. They were received there with much ceremony, very courteously treated, and the Captain and eight of the officers, with Col. Ripley, were invited to dine with the Prime Minister and all the high Princes of the Empire. They then went to Yokohama, 12 miles below Jeddo, where the men were allowed to go ashore. They left Japan on the 28th of November for Hong Kong, and made one of the shortest passages on record, occupying only seven and a half days, and one day making over 312 miles, under sail alone. After taking in coal and water, they took Mr. Ward on board, and after touching at Singapore, proceeded to Aden, on the Arabian coast of the Red Sea, where they stayed a week for Mr. Ward to take a steamer. While lying he
Batavia, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 16
The cruise of the Niagara. --A Boston paper publishes the following account of the cruise of the Niagara, which arrived there on Tuesday last: The Niagara left New York June 30, 1860, for Jeddo, with the Japanese Embassy on board. They first visited Port au Grand, at the Cape de Verde Islands, and then proceeded to Loango, on the coast of Africa. From there they made a stretch to Batavia, on the island of Java, the trip occupying 44 days. They remained there ten days, and then proceeded to Hong Kong. From there they went to Japan, arriving at Jeddo November 9. They were received there with much ceremony, very courteously treated, and the Captain and eight of the officers, with Col. Ripley, were invited to dine with the Prime Minister and all the high Princes of the Empire. They then went to Yokohama, 12 miles below Jeddo, where the men were allowed to go ashore. They left Japan on the 28th of November for Hong Kong, and made one of the shortest passages on
Java (Indonesia) (search for this): article 16
The cruise of the Niagara. --A Boston paper publishes the following account of the cruise of the Niagara, which arrived there on Tuesday last: The Niagara left New York June 30, 1860, for Jeddo, with the Japanese Embassy on board. They first visited Port au Grand, at the Cape de Verde Islands, and then proceeded to Loango, on the coast of Africa. From there they made a stretch to Batavia, on the island of Java, the trip occupying 44 days. They remained there ten days, and then proceeded to Hong Kong. From there they went to Japan, arriving at Jeddo November 9. They were received there with much ceremony, very courteously treated, and the Captain and eight of the officers, with Col. Ripley, were invited to dine with the Prime Minister and all the high Princes of the Empire. They then went to Yokohama, 12 miles below Jeddo, where the men were allowed to go ashore. They left Japan on the 28th of November for Hong Kong, and made one of the shortest passages on
Jeddoe (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 16
The cruise of the Niagara. --A Boston paper publishes the following account of the cruise of the Niagara, which arrived there on Tuesday last: The Niagara left New York June 30, 1860, for Jeddo, with the Japanese Embassy on board. They first visited Port au Grand, at the Cape de Verde Islands, and then proceeded to Loango, on the coast of Africa. From there they made a stretch to Batavia, on the island of Java, the trip occupying 44 days. They remained there ten days, and then proceeded to Hong Kong. From there they went to Japan, arriving at Jeddo November 9. They were received there with much ceremony, very courteously treated, and the Captain and eight of the officers, with Col. Ripley, were invited to dine with the Prime Minister and all the high Princes of the Empire. They then went to Yokohama, 12 miles below Jeddo, where the men were allowed to go ashore. They left Japan on the 28th of November for Hong Kong, and made one of the shortest passages on
Singapore (Singapore) (search for this): article 16
e officers, with Col. Ripley, were invited to dine with the Prime Minister and all the high Princes of the Empire. They then went to Yokohama, 12 miles below Jeddo, where the men were allowed to go ashore. They left Japan on the 28th of November for Hong Kong, and made one of the shortest passages on record, occupying only seven and a half days, and one day making over 312 miles, under sail alone. After taking in coal and water, they took Mr. Ward on board, and after touching at Singapore, proceeded to Aden, on the Arabian coast of the Red Sea, where they stayed a week for Mr. Ward to take a steamer. While lying here, they got the news of the election in the United States, and of the secession feeling at the South. No State had seceded at their latest advices there, but it was believed that South Carolina would certainly go, and perhaps be joined by other States. They then went to Cape Town, and had a very boisterous passage through the Mozambique channel. They
Hong Kong (China) (search for this): article 16
au Grand, at the Cape de Verde Islands, and then proceeded to Loango, on the coast of Africa. From there they made a stretch to Batavia, on the island of Java, the trip occupying 44 days. They remained there ten days, and then proceeded to Hong Kong. From there they went to Japan, arriving at Jeddo November 9. They were received there with much ceremony, very courteously treated, and the Captain and eight of the officers, with Col. Ripley, were invited to dine with the Prime Minister and all the high Princes of the Empire. They then went to Yokohama, 12 miles below Jeddo, where the men were allowed to go ashore. They left Japan on the 28th of November for Hong Kong, and made one of the shortest passages on record, occupying only seven and a half days, and one day making over 312 miles, under sail alone. After taking in coal and water, they took Mr. Ward on board, and after touching at Singapore, proceeded to Aden, on the Arabian coast of the Red Sea, where they
Japan (Japan) (search for this): article 16
ands, and then proceeded to Loango, on the coast of Africa. From there they made a stretch to Batavia, on the island of Java, the trip occupying 44 days. They remained there ten days, and then proceeded to Hong Kong. From there they went to Japan, arriving at Jeddo November 9. They were received there with much ceremony, very courteously treated, and the Captain and eight of the officers, with Col. Ripley, were invited to dine with the Prime Minister and all the high Princes of the Empire. They then went to Yokohama, 12 miles below Jeddo, where the men were allowed to go ashore. They left Japan on the 28th of November for Hong Kong, and made one of the shortest passages on record, occupying only seven and a half days, and one day making over 312 miles, under sail alone. After taking in coal and water, they took Mr. Ward on board, and after touching at Singapore, proceeded to Aden, on the Arabian coast of the Red Sea, where they stayed a week for Mr. Ward to take
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