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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: may 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 12
From Petersburg.[special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Petersburg, April 30, 1861 Our streets were again enlivened to-day by the presence of Palmetto troops, who arrived from Weldon by special train at 12½ o'clock. Though we have had to record the passage of so many troops, on so many different occasions, through our city, yet the welcome extended to this detachment of volunteers, and the interest expressed in and felt for them, were no less genuine and enthusiastic than on any previous occasion. Long before the hour of arrival, squads of gentlemen and companies of ladies wended their way thither, and every place at all prominent or comfortable was appropriated, and thousands not so fortunate were compelled to stand exposed to the sun, the wind and the dust. The troops were formed into line, and drawn up in front of Jarratt's Hotel, where they were welcomed in an able and patriotic address, by the Rev. Theodoric Pryor, who referred in eloquent terms to the prestige of th
ion of all, with the exception of the temporary illness of one of the men belonging to the Lancaster Invincibles. Much sympathy was shown, and prompt measures were taken to relieve him, which were soon successful. Considerable amusement was caused by several of the troops appearing in line minus their military hats. They had, unfortunately, lost them on their journey here, by having them blown off their heads while looking out of the windows of the cars when in rapid motion. The losses were soon restored, however, and new ones furnished by some of our citizens. Several new companies have been organized this week, among which I may mention the "Lee's Life Guard," Capt. James R. Branch, numbering 100 men, for active service, and the Home Artillery, composed of 30 picked men, with two cannon, Capt. R. A. Young. This company is for home use entirely, unless urgent necessity should require their services elsewhere. Our powder magazine is nightly guarded. Mon CŒur.
J. B. Kershaw (search for this): article 12
all prominent or comfortable was appropriated, and thousands not so fortunate were compelled to stand exposed to the sun, the wind and the dust. The troops were formed into line, and drawn up in front of Jarratt's Hotel, where they were welcomed in an able and patriotic address, by the Rev. Theodoric Pryor, who referred in eloquent terms to the prestige of their noble State, and paid a glowing tribute to her present attitude, and to the bravery and patriotism of her undaunted troops. Col. J. B. Kershaw, the commander of the regiment, answered in a strain at once eloquent and commanding, which gained for him the undivided and breathless attention and the hearty applause of the whole assemblage. Several other speeches were also made, one of which, that of the Chaplain, Lieut. Meynardie, was worthy of special note. Everything passed off pleasantly and to the entire satisfaction of all, with the exception of the temporary illness of one of the men belonging to the Lancaster Invincibles
James R. Branch (search for this): article 12
ion of all, with the exception of the temporary illness of one of the men belonging to the Lancaster Invincibles. Much sympathy was shown, and prompt measures were taken to relieve him, which were soon successful. Considerable amusement was caused by several of the troops appearing in line minus their military hats. They had, unfortunately, lost them on their journey here, by having them blown off their heads while looking out of the windows of the cars when in rapid motion. The losses were soon restored, however, and new ones furnished by some of our citizens. Several new companies have been organized this week, among which I may mention the "Lee's Life Guard," Capt. James R. Branch, numbering 100 men, for active service, and the Home Artillery, composed of 30 picked men, with two cannon, Capt. R. A. Young. This company is for home use entirely, unless urgent necessity should require their services elsewhere. Our powder magazine is nightly guarded. Mon CŒur.
R. A. Young (search for this): article 12
ion of all, with the exception of the temporary illness of one of the men belonging to the Lancaster Invincibles. Much sympathy was shown, and prompt measures were taken to relieve him, which were soon successful. Considerable amusement was caused by several of the troops appearing in line minus their military hats. They had, unfortunately, lost them on their journey here, by having them blown off their heads while looking out of the windows of the cars when in rapid motion. The losses were soon restored, however, and new ones furnished by some of our citizens. Several new companies have been organized this week, among which I may mention the "Lee's Life Guard," Capt. James R. Branch, numbering 100 men, for active service, and the Home Artillery, composed of 30 picked men, with two cannon, Capt. R. A. Young. This company is for home use entirely, unless urgent necessity should require their services elsewhere. Our powder magazine is nightly guarded. Mon CŒur.
Theodoric Pryor (search for this): article 12
t for them, were no less genuine and enthusiastic than on any previous occasion. Long before the hour of arrival, squads of gentlemen and companies of ladies wended their way thither, and every place at all prominent or comfortable was appropriated, and thousands not so fortunate were compelled to stand exposed to the sun, the wind and the dust. The troops were formed into line, and drawn up in front of Jarratt's Hotel, where they were welcomed in an able and patriotic address, by the Rev. Theodoric Pryor, who referred in eloquent terms to the prestige of their noble State, and paid a glowing tribute to her present attitude, and to the bravery and patriotism of her undaunted troops. Col. J. B. Kershaw, the commander of the regiment, answered in a strain at once eloquent and commanding, which gained for him the undivided and breathless attention and the hearty applause of the whole assemblage. Several other speeches were also made, one of which, that of the Chaplain, Lieut. Meynardi
ev. Theodoric Pryor, who referred in eloquent terms to the prestige of their noble State, and paid a glowing tribute to her present attitude, and to the bravery and patriotism of her undaunted troops. Col. J. B. Kershaw, the commander of the regiment, answered in a strain at once eloquent and commanding, which gained for him the undivided and breathless attention and the hearty applause of the whole assemblage. Several other speeches were also made, one of which, that of the Chaplain, Lieut. Meynardie, was worthy of special note. Everything passed off pleasantly and to the entire satisfaction of all, with the exception of the temporary illness of one of the men belonging to the Lancaster Invincibles. Much sympathy was shown, and prompt measures were taken to relieve him, which were soon successful. Considerable amusement was caused by several of the troops appearing in line minus their military hats. They had, unfortunately, lost them on their journey here, by having them blo
April 30th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 12
From Petersburg.[special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Petersburg, April 30, 1861 Our streets were again enlivened to-day by the presence of Palmetto troops, who arrived from Weldon by special train at 12½ o'clock. Though we have had to record the passage of so many troops, on so many different occasions, through our city, yet the welcome extended to this detachment of volunteers, and the interest expressed in and felt for them, were no less genuine and enthusiastic than on any previous occasion. Long before the hour of arrival, squads of gentlemen and companies of ladies wended their way thither, and every place at all prominent or comfortable was appropriated, and thousands not so fortunate were compelled to stand exposed to the sun, the wind and the dust. The troops were formed into line, and drawn up in front of Jarratt's Hotel, where they were welcomed in an able and patriotic address, by the Rev. Theodoric Pryor, who referred in eloquent terms to the prestige of th