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ented Wilson's Fighting Zouaves with a pair of revolvers each. It is the unanimous wish of that regiment — expressed on repeated occasions — to force a passage through the Monumental city. The same desire is expressed by the Fire Department Zouaves, and, in fact, is universally cherished by the soldiers of New York. The petition to the President urging that the Baltimore route be held by the Government at any cost, is receiving numerous signatures of influential citizens throughout the city. Col. Learned is organizing a"Pathfinders' Association," the avowed object of which is to cleave a road to the capital through Baltimore. "Our route is through Baltimore," is printed in large letters at the foot of a poster, stuck about town, asking for recruits for the Fifth Regiment of New York volunteers. The New York papers complain that although there are 20,000 men now in that city ready to go to Washington, or anywhere else, they cannot procure fire-arms, especially Minnie rifle
S. T. Wilson (search for this): article 8
The "fighting Zouaves." The New York Journal of Commerce remarks as follows: In connection with George Law's letter to President Lincoln, advising the clearance of a path through Baltimore at all hazards, it is a significant fact that that gentleman presented Wilson's Fighting Zouaves with a pair of revolvers each. It is the unanimous wish of that regiment — expressed on repeated occasions — to force a passage through the Monumental city. The same desire is expressed by the Fire Department Zouaves, and, in fact, is universally cherished by the soldiers of New York. The petition to the President urging that the Baltimore route be held by the Government at any cost, is receiving numerous signatures of influential citizens throughout the city. Col. Learned is organizing a"Pathfinders' Association," the avowed object of which is to cleave a road to the capital through Baltimore. "Our route is through Baltimore," is printed in large letters at the foot of a poster, stuck abo
The "fighting Zouaves." The New York Journal of Commerce remarks as follows: In connection with George Law's letter to President Lincoln, advising the clearance of a path through Baltimore at all hazards, it is a significant fact that that gentleman presented Wilson's Fighting Zouaves with a pair of revolvers each. It is the unanimous wish of that regiment — expressed on repeated occasions — to force a passage through the Monumental city. The same desire is expressed by the Fire Department Zouaves, and, in fact, is universally cherished by the soldiers of New York. The petition to the President urging that the Baltimore route be held by the Government at any cost, is receiving numerous signatures of influential citizens throughout the city. Col. Learned is organizing a"Pathfinders' Association," the avowed object of which is to cleave a road to the capital through Baltimore. "Our route is through Baltimore," is printed in large letters at the foot of a poster, stuck ab