hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Abe Lincoln 24 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
George Taylor 9 1 Browse Search
Charles S. Lewis 8 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
S. M. C. Montgomery 8 0 Browse Search
Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: may 8, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 20 total hits in 8 results.

Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
Cape Henlopen and hauled their boat seven miles to the next inland water, proceeded south as far as that would carry them, and then disembarked and dragged the yawl five miles further, until they reached the water between the mainland and the islands which skirt the coast of Maryland and the Eastern shore of Virginia. Down this they made their way to Chincoteague inlet, whence they emerged into the Atlantic and finally landed in Lynhaven, where their boat was carried three miles farther and launched into the Eastern branch of the Elizabeth River.--They arrived here on Friday evening, having suffered occasionally for want of provisions and water. Capt. Rue says that the excitement in New York is calming down, and the enlistments were confined to those who had nothing else before them but starvation. He saw a company of men without coats or shoes who were to be sent South, but the men were more anxious to go where they could get something to eat than to fight.--Norfolk Herald.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 9
the Taylor embarked in a yawl boat with three of his crew, and taking on board Capt. Sallyer, proceeded down to Staten Island, where they were taken in tow by a schooner and carried to Cape. May. Thence they crossed to Cape Henlopen and hauled their boat seven miles to the next inland water, proceeded south as far as that would carry them, and then disembarked and dragged the yawl five miles further, until they reached the water between the mainland and the islands which skirt the coast of Maryland and the Eastern shore of Virginia. Down this they made their way to Chincoteague inlet, whence they emerged into the Atlantic and finally landed in Lynhaven, where their boat was carried three miles farther and launched into the Eastern branch of the Elizabeth River.--They arrived here on Friday evening, having suffered occasionally for want of provisions and water. Capt. Rue says that the excitement in New York is calming down, and the enlistments were confined to those who had nothi
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 9
Determined to escape. --A more determined and successfully carried out plan to escape from the tyranny of the North is hard to find than that of Capt. O. F. Rue, of the schooner J. M. Taylor, and Capt. Sallyer, of the schooner Francis Burnett. These vessels were laid up in New York harbor, and the captains being Southern men (from North Carolina) were anxious to get home to their families.--Accordingly on Sunday night the captain of the Taylor embarked in a yawl boat with three of his crew, and taking on board Capt. Sallyer, proceeded down to Staten Island, where they were taken in tow by a schooner and carried to Cape. May. Thence they crossed to Cape Henlopen and hauled their boat seven miles to the next inland water, proceeded south as far as that would carry them, and then disembarked and dragged the yawl five miles further, until they reached the water between the mainland and the islands which skirt the coast of Maryland and the Eastern shore of Virginia. Down this they
Staten Island (New York, United States) (search for this): article 9
y carried out plan to escape from the tyranny of the North is hard to find than that of Capt. O. F. Rue, of the schooner J. M. Taylor, and Capt. Sallyer, of the schooner Francis Burnett. These vessels were laid up in New York harbor, and the captains being Southern men (from North Carolina) were anxious to get home to their families.--Accordingly on Sunday night the captain of the Taylor embarked in a yawl boat with three of his crew, and taking on board Capt. Sallyer, proceeded down to Staten Island, where they were taken in tow by a schooner and carried to Cape. May. Thence they crossed to Cape Henlopen and hauled their boat seven miles to the next inland water, proceeded south as far as that would carry them, and then disembarked and dragged the yawl five miles further, until they reached the water between the mainland and the islands which skirt the coast of Maryland and the Eastern shore of Virginia. Down this they made their way to Chincoteague inlet, whence they emerged into
Cape Henlopen (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 9
the schooner J. M. Taylor, and Capt. Sallyer, of the schooner Francis Burnett. These vessels were laid up in New York harbor, and the captains being Southern men (from North Carolina) were anxious to get home to their families.--Accordingly on Sunday night the captain of the Taylor embarked in a yawl boat with three of his crew, and taking on board Capt. Sallyer, proceeded down to Staten Island, where they were taken in tow by a schooner and carried to Cape. May. Thence they crossed to Cape Henlopen and hauled their boat seven miles to the next inland water, proceeded south as far as that would carry them, and then disembarked and dragged the yawl five miles further, until they reached the water between the mainland and the islands which skirt the coast of Maryland and the Eastern shore of Virginia. Down this they made their way to Chincoteague inlet, whence they emerged into the Atlantic and finally landed in Lynhaven, where their boat was carried three miles farther and launched
Norfolk Herald (search for this): article 9
o Cape Henlopen and hauled their boat seven miles to the next inland water, proceeded south as far as that would carry them, and then disembarked and dragged the yawl five miles further, until they reached the water between the mainland and the islands which skirt the coast of Maryland and the Eastern shore of Virginia. Down this they made their way to Chincoteague inlet, whence they emerged into the Atlantic and finally landed in Lynhaven, where their boat was carried three miles farther and launched into the Eastern branch of the Elizabeth River.--They arrived here on Friday evening, having suffered occasionally for want of provisions and water. Capt. Rue says that the excitement in New York is calming down, and the enlistments were confined to those who had nothing else before them but starvation. He saw a company of men without coats or shoes who were to be sent South, but the men were more anxious to go where they could get something to eat than to fight.--Norfolk Herald.
Determined to escape. --A more determined and successfully carried out plan to escape from the tyranny of the North is hard to find than that of Capt. O. F. Rue, of the schooner J. M. Taylor, and Capt. Sallyer, of the schooner Francis Burnett. These vessels were laid up in New York harbor, and the captains being Southern men (from North Carolina) were anxious to get home to their families.--Accordingly on Sunday night the captain of the Taylor embarked in a yawl boat with three of his crew, and taking on board Capt. Sallyer, proceeded down to Staten Island, where they were taken in tow by a schooner and carried to Cape. May. Thence they crossed to Cape Henlopen and hauled their boat seven miles to the next inland water, proceeded south as far as that would carry them, and then disembarked and dragged the yawl five miles further, until they reached the water between the mainland and the islands which skirt the coast of Maryland and the Eastern shore of Virginia. Down this the
O. F. Rue (search for this): article 9
Determined to escape. --A more determined and successfully carried out plan to escape from the tyranny of the North is hard to find than that of Capt. O. F. Rue, of the schooner J. M. Taylor, and Capt. Sallyer, of the schooner Francis Burnett. These vessels were laid up in New York harbor, and the captains being Southern men (from North Carolina) were anxious to get home to their families.--Accordingly on Sunday night the captain of the Taylor embarked in a yawl boat with three of his cr finally landed in Lynhaven, where their boat was carried three miles farther and launched into the Eastern branch of the Elizabeth River.--They arrived here on Friday evening, having suffered occasionally for want of provisions and water. Capt. Rue says that the excitement in New York is calming down, and the enlistments were confined to those who had nothing else before them but starvation. He saw a company of men without coats or shoes who were to be sent South, but the men were more a