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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 9, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 899 total hits in 444 results.

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William H. Seward (search for this): article 1
r. Faulkner's interview with M. Thouvenel, the French courier for Foreign Affairs, has been published, the Department of State at Washington has thought proper to publish the correspondence. We have already noticed the decisive instructions of Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton growing out of Mr. Faulkner's letter: Legation of the United States. Paris April 15, 1861. Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State:-- Sir:--I called to-day upon M. Thouvenel, at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and wHon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State:-- Sir:--I called to-day upon M. Thouvenel, at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and was promptly admitted to an interview. Agreeably to your request, I handed to him a copy of the inaugural address of President Lincoln, and added that I was instructed by you to say to him that it embraced the views of the President of the United States upon the difficulties which now disturb the harmony of the American Union, and also an exposition of the general policy which it was the purpose of the government to pursue with a view to the preservation of domestic peace and the maintenance of
at Washington has thought proper to publish the correspondence. We have already noticed the decisive instructions of Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton growing out of Mr. Faulkner's letter: Legation of the United States. Paris April 15, 1861. Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State:-- Sir:--I called to-day upon M. Thouvenel, at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and was promptly admitted to an interview. Agreeably to your request, I handed to him a copy of the inaugural address of President Lincoln, and added that I was instructed by you to say to him that it embraced the views of the President of the United States upon the difficulties which now disturb the harmony of the American Union, and also an exposition of the general policy which it was the purpose of the government to pursue with a view to the preservation of domestic peace and the maintenance of the Federal Union. Here M. Thouvenel asked if there was not some diversity of opinion in the Cabinet of the President as to
Diplomatic correspondence. An imperfect statement of Mr. Faulkner's interview with M. Thouvenel, the French courier for Foreign Affairs, has been published, the Department of State at Washington has thought proper to publish the correspondence. We have already noticed the decisive instructions of Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton growing out of Mr. Faulkner's letter: Legation of the United States. Paris April 15, 1861. Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State:-- Sir:--I called to-day upon M. Thouvenel, at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and was promptly admitted to an interview. Agreeably to your request, I handed to him a copy of the inaugural address of President Lincoln, and added that I was instructed by you to say to him that it embraced the views of the President of the United States upon the difficulties which now disturb the harmony of the American Union, and also an exposition of the general policy which it was the purpose of the government to pursue with a view t
Diplomatic correspondence. An imperfect statement of Mr. Faulkner's interview with M. Thouvenel, the French courier for Foreign Affairs, has been published, the Department of State at Washington has thought proper to publish the correspondence. We have already noticed the decisive instructions of Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton growing out of Mr. Faulkner's letter: Legation of the United States. Paris April 15, 1861. Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State:-- Sir:--I called to-day Mr. Faulkner's letter: Legation of the United States. Paris April 15, 1861. Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State:-- Sir:--I called to-day upon M. Thouvenel, at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and was promptly admitted to an interview. Agreeably to your request, I handed to him a copy of the inaugural address of President Lincoln, and added that I was instructed by you to say to him that it embraced the views of the President of the United States upon the difficulties which now disturb the harmony of the American Union, and also an exposition of the general policy which it was the purpose of the government to pursue with a view t
April 15th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
Diplomatic correspondence. An imperfect statement of Mr. Faulkner's interview with M. Thouvenel, the French courier for Foreign Affairs, has been published, the Department of State at Washington has thought proper to publish the correspondence. We have already noticed the decisive instructions of Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton growing out of Mr. Faulkner's letter: Legation of the United States. Paris April 15, 1861. Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State:-- Sir:--I called to-day upon M. Thouvenel, at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and was promptly admitted to an interview. Agreeably to your request, I handed to him a copy of the inaugural address of President Lincoln, and added that I was instructed by you to say to him that it embraced the views of the President of the United States upon the difficulties which now disturb the harmony of the American Union, and also an exposition of the general policy which it was the purpose of the government to pursue with a view
M. Thouvenel (search for this): article 1
nce. An imperfect statement of Mr. Faulkner's interview with M. Thouvenel, the French courier for Foreign Affairs, has been published, the. H. Seward, Secretary of State:-- Sir:--I called to-day upon M. Thouvenel, at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and was promptly admitted tf domestic peace and the maintenance of the Federal Union. Here M. Thouvenel asked if there was not some diversity of opinion in the Cabinet ng with the deliberate and loyal action of the American people. M. Thouvenel expressed his pleasure at the assurance. I further said thanew Minister accredited by the United States to this Court. M. Thouvenel, in reply, said that no application of yet been made to him by tThe conversation was then further protracted for an inquiry from M. Thouvenel when the new tariff would go into operation, and whether it was nce in the assertion of their claims to a separate sovereignty. M. Thouvenel expressed the opinion that its employment of force would be unwi
Charles J. Faulener (search for this): article 1
iment of the people was opposed to the employment of force against the seceding States. So sincere was the deference felt at that country for the great principles of self government, and so great the respect for the front of the people when adopted, under the repressing forms of State organization and State sovereignty, that I did not think the employment of force would be tolerated for a continent and I thought the only solution of any difficulties would be found in such modifications of our constitutional compact as would invite the seceding States back into the Union of a peaceful acquiescence in the assertion of their claims to a separate sovereignty. M. Thouvenel expressed the opinion that its employment of force would be unwise, and would tend to a further rupture of the Confederacy, by causing the remaining Southern States to make common cause with the States which had already taken action on the project. Chas. J. Faulener. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant.
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 1
red the fact to be known that whenever any such application shall be made to will meet with opposition from the Minister who shall then represent that Government at this Court. I said to him that permission at this Court would soon terminate, and I should have no official connection with the question which it was anticipated that arise upon the demand of the Confederate States for recognition of their independency that my place would soon be supplied by a distinguished citizen of the State of New Jersey, a gentleman who possessed the of the President, who fully sympathized in his public views, and who would come fully instructed as to the then and views of the Government of the United States, and that the only request which I would now make, and which would all I had to say in the interview, was that no proposition recognizing the permanent of the American Union shall be considered by the French Government until after the arrival and reception of the new Minister accredited by
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
Mr. Faulkner's letter: Legation of the United States. Paris April 15, 1861. Hon. Wm. H.embraced the views of the President of the United States upon the difficulties which now disturb thed to assure you that the President of the United States entertains a full confidence in the speedy appeal would be made before long by the Confederate States to foreign Powers, and, against others, portant inquiry; but the Government of the United States desired the fact to be known that wheneveripated that arise upon the demand of the Confederate States for recognition of their independency the then and views of the Government of the United States, and that the only request which I would ntion of the new Minister accredited by the United States to this Court. M. Thouvenel, in replyplication of yet been made to him by the Confederate States in any form for the recognition of theirerest of France, and the Government of the United States might rest well assured that no nasty nor [1 more...]
France (France) (search for this): article 1
urther said that the President regretted the events going on in the United States might be productive of some possible inconvenience to the people and subjects of France, that he was determined that those inconvenience shall be made as light and transient as and, so far as it may rest with him, that all strangers who may suffer athe President thought it not impossible to appeal would be made before long by the Confederate States to foreign Powers, and, against others, to the Government of France, as the recognition of their independence; that to such appeal having yet been made, it was premature and out of place to discuss any of the exports involved in tieved the maintenance of the Federal Union in its integrity was to be desired for the benefit of the people of the North and South, as well as for the interest of France, and the Government of the United States might rest well assured that no nasty nor precipitate action would be taken on that subject by the Emperor. But whilst h
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