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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: may 16, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
course of conduct of the Government of the United States towards the Commissioners of this Governmeuestioned by the Secretary of State of the United States, to whom it was addressed. I avail myrawford, one of the Commissioners of the Confederate States, a note in writing to the effect followiisting status, prejudicially to the Southern Confederate States, is at present contemplated. "ith a demand of the Commissioners of the Confederate States for a reply to their first letter, and tociate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State. N. Wm. H. Seward. Secretary of State of the United States, that contain an explanation of the nature intercourse of the Commissioners of the Confederate States with that officer. I considered that I , whether of the Federal Union or of the Confederate States, were more interested than that of promoed the Assistant Secretary of State of the United States (not being able to see the Secretary,) on [1 more...]
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
ail myself of this opportunity to correct an error in one of the statements made in my message of the 29th April. It is there recited that I was prompted to call you together, in extraordinary session, by reason of the declarations contained in the proclamation of President Lincoln of the 15th April.--My proclamation convoking you was issued on the 12th of April, and was prompted by the declaration of hostile purposes, contained in the message sent by President Lincoln to the Governor of South Carolina, on the 8th April. As the proclamation of President Lincoln, of the 15th April, repeated the same hostile intention, in more specific terms and on a much more extensive scale, it created a stronger impression on my mind, and led to the error above alluded to, and which, however unimportant, I desire to correct. Jefferson Davis. Montgomery, May 8, 1861. Washington, City, April 13, 1861. Sir: On the 15th March, ult., I left with Judge Crawford, one of the Commissioners
John F. Anderson (search for this): article 1
at this time to be pressed." The substance of this statement I communicated to you the same evening by letter.--Five days elapsed, and I called with a telegram from Gen. Beauregard, to the effect that Sumter was not evacuated, but that Maj. Anderson was at work making repairs. The next day, after conversing with you, I communicated to Judge Crawford in writing that the failure to evacuate Fort Sumter was not the result of bad faith, but was attributable to causes consistent with theat Charleston, the day following your last assurance, and is the evidence of the full faith I was invited to wait for and see. In the same paper I read that intercepted dispatches disclosed the fact that Mr. Fox, who had been allowed to visit Major Anderson, on the pledge that his purpose was pacific, employed his opportunity to devise a plan for supplying the fort by force, and that this plan had been adopted by the Washington Government, and was in process of execution. My recollection of the
P. G. Toutant Beauregard (search for this): article 1
hem through me. It is under an oppressive sense of the weight of the responsibility that I submit to you these things for your explanation. (Signed,) John A. Campbell, Very respectfully, Associate Justice of the Supreme C. U. S. Hon. Wm. H. Seward. Sec'y of State. Dispatches to L. P. Walker, Secretary of war. An authorized message from President Lincoln just informed Gov. Pickens and myself that provisions will be sent to Fort Sumter peaceably, or otherwise by force. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard:--If you have no doubt as to the authorized character of the agent who communicated to you the intention of the Washington Government to supply Fort Sumter by force, you will at once demand its evacuation, and if this is refused, proceed in such manner as you may determine to reduce it. Washington City, April 20, 1861. Sir: I enclose you a letter corresponding very nearly with one I addressed to you one week ago, (13th April,) to which I have not had any reply.
A. P. Fox (search for this): article 1
se, by force." This was the 8th of April, at Charleston, the day following your last assurance, and is the evidence of the full faith I was invited to wait for and see. In the same paper I read that intercepted dispatches disclosed the fact that Mr. Fox, who had been allowed to visit Major Anderson, on the pledge that his purpose was pacific, employed his opportunity to devise a plan for supplying the fort by force, and that this plan had been adopted by the Washington Government, and was in process of execution. My recollection of the date of Mr. Fox's visit carries it to a day in March. I learn he is a near connection of a member of the Cabinet. My connection with the Commissioners and yourself was superinduced by a conversation with Justice Nelson.--He informed me of your strong dispositions in favor of peace, and that you were oppressed with a demand of the Commissioners of the Confederate States for a reply to their first letter, and that you desired to avoid it, if possible,
William H. Seward (search for this): article 1
nsibility that I submit to you these things for your explanation. (Signed,) John A. Campbell, Very respectfully, Associate Justice of the Supreme C. U. S. Hon. Wm. H. Seward. Sec'y of State. Dispatches to L. P. Walker, Secretary of war. An authorized message from President Lincoln just informed Gov. Pickens and myself tperson who is entitled to ask an explanation of myself. John A. Campbell, Very respectfully, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State. No reply has been made to this letter. April 24, 1861. Montgomery, Ala., May 7, 1861. Sir: I submit to you two letters that were addressed by me to the Hon. Wm. H. Seward. Secretary of State of the United States, that contain an explanation of the nature and result of an intervention by me in the intercourse of the Commissioners of the Confederate States with that officer. I considered that I could perform no duty in which the entire American peopl
P. G. T. Beauregard (search for this): article 1
is statement I communicated to you the same evening by letter.--Five days elapsed, and I called with a telegram from Gen. Beauregard, to the effect that Sumter was not evacuated, but that Maj. Anderson was at work making repairs. The next day, and see." In the morning's paper I read: "An authorized messenger from President Lincoln informed Gov. Pickens and General Beauregard that provisions will be sent to Fort Sumter peaceably, or otherwise, by force." This was the 8th of April, at Charl proximate cause of the great calamity. I have a profound conviction that the telegrams of the 8th of April, of Gen. Beauregard, and of the 10th of April, of Gen. Walker, the Secretary of War, can be referred to nothing else than their belief ttes (not being able to see the Secretary,) on the 11th April, ult., of the existence of a telegram of that date from Gen. Beauregard to the Commissioners, in which he informed the Commissioners that he had demanded the evacuation of Sumter, and, if
Montgomery, May 8, 1861. Washington, City, April 13, 1861. Sir: On the 15th March, ult., I left with Judge Crawford, one of the Commissioners of the Confederate States, a note in writing to the effect following: "I feel entire d, but that Maj. Anderson was at work making repairs. The next day, after conversing with you, I communicated to Judge Crawford in writing that the failure to evacuate Fort Sumter was not the result of bad faith, but was attributable to causes clson was present at these conversations, three in number, and I submitted to him each of my written communications to Judge Crawford, and informed Judge C. that they had his (Judge Nelson's) sanction. I gave you, on the 22d of March, a substantial c Weed, to show how irksome and responsible the withdrawal of troops from Sumter was. A portion of my communication to Judge Crawford on the 15th of March was founded upon these remarks, and the pledge to evacuate Fort Sumter is less forcible than the
Pickens, I should have notice of any design to after the existing status there. Mr. Justice Nelson was present at these conversations, three in number, and I submitted to him each of my written communications to Judge Crawford, and informed Judge C. that they had his (Judge Nelson's) sanction. I gave you, on the 22d of March, a substantial copy of the statement I had made on the 15th. The 30th of March arrived, and at that time a telegram came from Gov. Pickens inquiring concerning Col. Lamon, whose visit to Charleston he supposed had a connection with the proposed evacuation of Fort Sumter. I left that with you, and was to have an answer the following Monday--1st April. On the 1st of April I received from you the statement in writing, "(I am satisfied) the Government will not undertake to supply Fort Sumter without giving notice to Governor P." The words "I am satisfied," were for me to use as expressive of confidence in the remainder of the declaration. The proposit
Abe Lincoln (search for this): article 1
y session, by reason of the declarations contained in the proclamation of President Lincoln of the 15th April.--My proclamation convoking you was issued on the 12th by the declaration of hostile purposes, contained in the message sent by President Lincoln to the Governor of South Carolina, on the 8th April. As the proclamation of President Lincoln, of the 15th April, repeated the same hostile intention, in more specific terms and on a much more extensive scale, it created a stronger impresit and see." In the morning's paper I read: "An authorized messenger from President Lincoln informed Gov. Pickens and General Beauregard that provisions will be sentpatches to L. P. Walker, Secretary of war. An authorized message from President Lincoln just informed Gov. Pickens and myself that provisions will be sent to Forused, he would proceed to reduce it. On the same day I had been told that President Lincoln had said that none of the vessels sent to Charleston were war vessels, an
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