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Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 1
tedness of Lord John Russell and the present Government it was entirely owing. Had they done as mere common sense would have suggested, the present danger would not only have been averted, but cotton would have been supplied without let or hindrance, and we might have remained on good terms with both belligerents. "Fortunately, it is not too late to put one question to the Government, and to take steps for the protection of whatever cotton may be at this moment in transitu by the Upper Mississippi and the lakes. There is reason to believe that hereafter American armed vessels on the Ohio river will intercept all further shipments by that route; but it is highly probable that large quantities of cotton have been accumulated in the southern district of Illinois, and are waiting the slow and irregular movements of the now crowded railways — Presuming that such cotton may reach Chicago, the question we desire to put is, whether any protection is to be afforded by armed British vess
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 1
mained on good terms with both belligerents. "Fortunately, it is not too late to put one question to the Government, and to take steps for the protection of whatever cotton may be at this moment in transitu by the Upper Mississippi and the lakes. There is reason to believe that hereafter American armed vessels on the Ohio river will intercept all further shipments by that route; but it is highly probable that large quantities of cotton have been accumulated in the southern district of Illinois, and are waiting the slow and irregular movements of the now crowded railways — Presuming that such cotton may reach Chicago, the question we desire to put is, whether any protection is to be afforded by armed British vessels to such cotton on the voyage down the Canadian likes to Montreal. Upon these lakes the Federal Government have efficient iron screw steamers, armed with large pivot guns, and under President Lincoln's proclamation such cotton, no doubt the property of British subjects
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
though it is as much a declaration of war as a President of the United States can issue, is it a declaration to be follow up by instant war? proffer of friendly services in the quarrel now threatening the United States with convulsion. Lord Malmesbury spoke the sentiments of the nthe war of 1812 have the relations between this country and the United States been more critical than they are at present. Most people have been astonished at what is now taking place in the United States; but it is neither creditable nor as it should be that her Majesty's principell, as we have said already, has left British interests in the United States to mind themselves until the eleventh hour, and for so doing heipowners will place themselves in Mr. Lincoln's hands. Were the United States possessed of a navy like our own, the blockade of the Southern to by ourselves during the long war, and the right of which the United States have alone retained, is what circumstances in the end must requ
Ohio (United States) (search for this): article 1
common sense would have suggested, the present danger would not only have been averted, but cotton would have been supplied without let or hindrance, and we might have remained on good terms with both belligerents. "Fortunately, it is not too late to put one question to the Government, and to take steps for the protection of whatever cotton may be at this moment in transitu by the Upper Mississippi and the lakes. There is reason to believe that hereafter American armed vessels on the Ohio river will intercept all further shipments by that route; but it is highly probable that large quantities of cotton have been accumulated in the southern district of Illinois, and are waiting the slow and irregular movements of the now crowded railways — Presuming that such cotton may reach Chicago, the question we desire to put is, whether any protection is to be afforded by armed British vessels to such cotton on the voyage down the Canadian likes to Montreal. Upon these lakes the Federal Gov
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 1
onciliation, and depreciates open war as a departure from the letter of the Constitution, which gives no power of coercion. The feeling in Virginians just now so strong that 20,000 volunteers from that State are reported as having joined the Southern army, and the desire for immediate secession appears to be carrying all before it in the Convention and elsewhere. Virginia will carry with her, it is said, the other neutral States--North Carolina, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri and Arkansas--Again, in the Far West, things are looking badly for the Government. The spirit of disaffection has crossed the Rocky Mountains and reached the Colorado river. The Territory of Arizona has resolved to join the South, and the ardent spirits of the North are cut off from all possibility of extension in the direction of Mexico. New Mexico, which is immediately to the north of Arizona, and in which the slavery party has made much progress, will probably also give in before long to the Gover
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
is all for conciliation, and depreciates open war as a departure from the letter of the Constitution, which gives no power of coercion. The feeling in Virginians just now so strong that 20,000 volunteers from that State are reported as having joined the Southern army, and the desire for immediate secession appears to be carrying all before it in the Convention and elsewhere. Virginia will carry with her, it is said, the other neutral States--North Carolina, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri and Arkansas--Again, in the Far West, things are looking badly for the Government. The spirit of disaffection has crossed the Rocky Mountains and reached the Colorado river. The Territory of Arizona has resolved to join the South, and the ardent spirits of the North are cut off from all possibility of extension in the direction of Mexico. New Mexico, which is immediately to the north of Arizona, and in which the slavery party has made much progress, will probably also give in before long
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
but not ships enough to transport this army to the harbor of Charleston. He has money, but not money enough to tim this army in an enemy's country. How is he to get to this Fort Sumter?--To be to march his army across the Bonder States? Does he propose to obtain a tree march across Virginia, or to force his way if a free passage should be refused --When this formidable difficulty is surmounted, does he expect with 75,000 men to North Carolina, and to pass through the whole length of South Carolina? We did not find it so easy to march regular troops through America even when its defenders were less numerous than they now are.--The idea of a land invasion with any detachment he could spare from his 75,000 men, is recently impossible. A descent by sea is hardly a loss out of the question in the face of an armed population, and considering the limit force of the States Navy. How then, is Mr. Lincoln to get to Fort Sumter? We commonly think that he is serious when he so cooly save
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
to march his army across the Bonder States? Does he propose to obtain a tree march across Virginia, or to force his way if a free passage should be refused --When this formidable difficulty is surmounted, does he expect with 75,000 men to North Carolina, and to pass through the whole length of South Carolina? We did not find it so easy to march regular troops through America even when its defenders were less numerous than they now are.--The idea of a land invasion with any detachment he cofrom that State are reported as having joined the Southern army, and the desire for immediate secession appears to be carrying all before it in the Convention and elsewhere. Virginia will carry with her, it is said, the other neutral States--North Carolina, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri and Arkansas--Again, in the Far West, things are looking badly for the Government. The spirit of disaffection has crossed the Rocky Mountains and reached the Colorado river. The Territory of Arizona
Arizona (Arizona, United States) (search for this): article 1
es--North Carolina, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri and Arkansas--Again, in the Far West, things are looking badly for the Government. The spirit of disaffection has crossed the Rocky Mountains and reached the Colorado river. The Territory of Arizona has resolved to join the South, and the ardent spirits of the North are cut off from all possibility of extension in the direction of Mexico. New Mexico, which is immediately to the north of Arizona, and in which the slavery party has madArizona, and in which the slavery party has made much progress, will probably also give in before long to the Government at Montgomery. With this serious situation in view, what can be the meaning of President Lincoln calling out the militia? Seventy five thousand men are demanded, and he again announces his determination of is taking the Federal property in the seceded States. Now, this is either serious or not; either a declaration of war or not. If a declaration of war, we hold it to be unwise. In the first place, the bona fide c
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 1
it in the Convention and elsewhere. Virginia will carry with her, it is said, the other neutral States--North Carolina, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri and Arkansas--Again, in the Far West, things are looking badly for the Government. The spirit of disaffection has crossed the Rocky Mountains and reached the Colorado river. The Territory of Arizona has resolved to join the South, and the ardent spirits of the North are cut off from all possibility of extension in the direction of Mexico. New Mexico, which is immediately to the north of Arizona, and in which the slavery party has made much progress, will probably also give in before long to the Government at Montgomery. With this serious situation in view, what can be the meaning of President Lincoln calling out the militia? Seventy five thousand men are demanded, and he again announces his determination of is taking the Federal property in the seceded States. Now, this is either serious or not; either a declaration
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