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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: may 18, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
Senator Bayard, of Delaware. --This gentleman, a Senator of the United States, who has lately been threatened with mob violence for his political opinions, has published an address to the people of Delaware. He declares his attachment to the Union, but in order to avoid civil war favored, in a speech made in March last, a peaceful separation of a part of the States from the Union, leaving that Union unbroken as to the far greater number, and the Federal Government as the government of a powerful and great nation.--Time and the progress of events will, he confidently believes, vindicate the wisdom of his counsel. In conclusion he says: I am one of your Representatives in the Senate of the United States, and my term of office does not expire until March, 1863 I view, however, the relation of constituent and representative as one of confidence, and when I am satisfied that civil war cannot be averted, and find that the public sentiment of my State prefers such a result to t
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 2
Senator Bayard, of Delaware. --This gentleman, a Senator of the United States, who has lately been threatened with mob violence for his political opinions, has published an address to the people of Delaware. He declares his attachment to the Union, but in order to avoid civil war favored, in a speech made in March last, a peaceful separation of a part of the States from the Union, leaving that Union unbroken as to the far greater number, and the Federal Government as the government of a pDelaware. He declares his attachment to the Union, but in order to avoid civil war favored, in a speech made in March last, a peaceful separation of a part of the States from the Union, leaving that Union unbroken as to the far greater number, and the Federal Government as the government of a powerful and great nation.--Time and the progress of events will, he confidently believes, vindicate the wisdom of his counsel. In conclusion he says: I am one of your Representatives in the Senate of the United States, and my term of office does not expire until March, 1863 I view, however, the relation of constituent and representative as one of confidence, and when I am satisfied that civil war cannot be averted, and find that the public sentiment of my State prefers such a result to th
Senator Bayard, of Delaware. --This gentleman, a Senator of the United States, who has lately been threatened with mob violence for his political opinions, has published an address to the people of Delaware. He declares his attachment to the Union, but in order to avoid civil war favored, in a speech made in March last, a peaceful separation of a part of the States from the Union, leaving that Union unbroken as to the far greater number, and the Federal Government as the government of a powerful and great nation.--Time and the progress of events will, he confidently believes, vindicate the wisdom of his counsel. In conclusion he says: I am one of your Representatives in the Senate of the United States, and my term of office does not expire until March, 1863 I view, however, the relation of constituent and representative as one of confidence, and when I am satisfied that civil war cannot be averted, and find that the public sentiment of my State prefers such a result to th
Senator Bayard, of Delaware. --This gentleman, a Senator of the United States, who has lately been threatened with mob violence for his political opinions, has published an address to the people of Delaware. He declares his attachment to the Union, but in order to avoid civil war favored, in a speech made in March last, a peaceful separation of a part of the States from the Union, leaving that Union unbroken as to the far greater number, and the Federal Government as the government of a powerful and great nation.--Time and the progress of events will, he confidently believes, vindicate the wisdom of his counsel. In conclusion he says: I am one of your Representatives in the Senate of the United States, and my term of office does not expire until March, 1863 I view, however, the relation of constituent and representative as one of confidence, and when I am satisfied that civil war cannot be averted, and find that the public sentiment of my State prefers such a result to t
March, 1863 AD (search for this): article 2
d civil war favored, in a speech made in March last, a peaceful separation of a part of the States from the Union, leaving that Union unbroken as to the far greater number, and the Federal Government as the government of a powerful and great nation.--Time and the progress of events will, he confidently believes, vindicate the wisdom of his counsel. In conclusion he says: I am one of your Representatives in the Senate of the United States, and my term of office does not expire until March, 1863 I view, however, the relation of constituent and representative as one of confidence, and when I am satisfied that civil war cannot be averted, and find that the public sentiment of my State prefers such a result to the peaceful separation of those States which have withdrawn from the Union, I shall cheerfully and gladly resign into your hands an office which I obtained without solicitation, and which neither my sense of duty nor my self-respect would permit me to hold when I ascertain th