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Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
duct of Davis, we shall soon pass to the acts of Quitman at the gates of Mexico; but before doing so, we will be permitted a momentary notice of the behavior of the South Carolina regiment under the fire of the Mexican enemy. Those who sneer at Carolina courage and virtues are, in general, too ignorant of history to be affected by the record. Butler left his sick bed, against medical advice, to lead the Palmettos. His horse was shot under him. He took another, and was severely wounded. Dickigh the ranks. Shot and shell hailed upon them. The storm raged: "In the whole history," says Claiborne, "there has never been a more striking example of indifference to death, the result of stern resolve. Each man fought for the honor of Carolina. Several companies were almost annihilated. Some had not men enough left to bury then dead, or bear their wounded to the ambulances. The uniforms of some of the officers were literally torn from their persons; the color bearers were shot down
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 6
upon him stimulated the Missippians. They increased their speed, and when the enemy was within one hundred yards of the battery, and confident of its capture, they took him in flank and reverse, and poured in a raking and destructive fire. This broke his right line, and the rest soon gave way and fled back precipitately. Here Col. Davis was severely wounded." After this lengthy extract in regard to the heroic conduct of Davis, we shall soon pass to the acts of Quitman at the gates of Mexico; but before doing so, we will be permitted a momentary notice of the behavior of the South Carolina regiment under the fire of the Mexican enemy. Those who sneer at Carolina courage and virtues are, in general, too ignorant of history to be affected by the record. Butler left his sick bed, against medical advice, to lead the Palmettos. His horse was shot under him. He took another, and was severely wounded. Dickinson now commanded, and taking the flag from Beggs, was himself shot down, a
Slaughter (search for this): article 6
The battle of Buena Vista. How Mississippians and South Carolinians Fight — Terrible Slaughter of a Thousand Mexican Lancers. In times of excitement like the present, when we read so much in Black Republican journals about the easy conquest of the entire South, the article below will be read with interest. The enemy forget, probably, that men of the same heroic daring and firm resolve are still alive; men who will prove to the world that they can neither be intimidated by threats, nor overawed by numbers. In reviewing Claiborne's Life and Times of Quitman, in DeBow's Review, the writer says: An episode may be here tolerated in regard to the conduct of the celebrated Mississippi Rifles, under charge of Colonel, now President Jefferson Davis, on the field of Buena Vista. The great movement then made by Davis is said to have been without previous parallel in the art of war, and was regarded by the Duke of Wellington as new and masterly. It was subsequently made, we l
, we will be permitted a momentary notice of the behavior of the South Carolina regiment under the fire of the Mexican enemy. Those who sneer at Carolina courage and virtues are, in general, too ignorant of history to be affected by the record. Butler left his sick bed, against medical advice, to lead the Palmettos. His horse was shot under him. He took another, and was severely wounded. Dickinson now commanded, and taking the flag from Beggs, was himself shot down, as was also Beggs. ButleButler, resuming the command, was killed by the side of Dickinson, under the flag. Dickinson fell again, but now mortally wounded; and Gladden placing the flag in the hands of Leonard, led the charge. There was no wavering as death swept through the ranks. Shot and shell hailed upon them. The storm raged: "In the whole history," says Claiborne, "there has never been a more striking example of indifference to death, the result of stern resolve. Each man fought for the honor of Carolina. Sev
re, in general, too ignorant of history to be affected by the record. Butler left his sick bed, against medical advice, to lead the Palmettos. His horse was shot under him. He took another, and was severely wounded. Dickinson now commanded, and taking the flag from Beggs, was himself shot down, as was also Beggs. Butler, resuming the command, was killed by the side of Dickinson, under the flag. Dickinson fell again, but now mortally wounded; and Gladden placing the flag in the hands of Leonard, led the charge. There was no wavering as death swept through the ranks. Shot and shell hailed upon them. The storm raged: "In the whole history," says Claiborne, "there has never been a more striking example of indifference to death, the result of stern resolve. Each man fought for the honor of Carolina. Several companies were almost annihilated. Some had not men enough left to bury then dead, or bear their wounded to the ambulances. The uniforms of some of the officers were li
Terrible Slaughter of a Thousand Mexican Lancers. In times of excitement like the present, when we read so much in Black Republican journals about the easy conquest of the entire South, the article below will be read with interest. The enemy forget, probably, that men of the same heroic daring and firm resolve are still alive; men who will prove to the world that they can neither be intimidated by threats, nor overawed by numbers. In reviewing Claiborne's Life and Times of Quitman, in DeBow's Review, the writer says: An episode may be here tolerated in regard to the conduct of the celebrated Mississippi Rifles, under charge of Colonel, now President Jefferson Davis, on the field of Buena Vista. The great movement then made by Davis is said to have been without previous parallel in the art of war, and was regarded by the Duke of Wellington as new and masterly. It was subsequently made, we learn on the authority of Gen. Cushing, on the fields of the Crimes. "The battle ha
W. Taylor (search for this): article 6
duct of the celebrated Mississippi Rifles, under charge of Colonel, now President Jefferson Davis, on the field of Buena Vista. The great movement then made by Davis is said to have been without previous parallel in the art of war, and was regarded by the Duke of Wellington as new and masterly. It was subsequently made, we learn on the authority of Gen. Cushing, on the fields of the Crimes. "The battle had been raging some time with fluctuating fortunes, and was setting against us, when Gen. Taylor, with Col. Davis and others, arrived on the field Several regiments (which were subsequently rallied, and fought bravely,) were in full retreat; O'Brien, after having his men and horses completely cut up, had been compelled to draw off the guns, and Bragg, with almost superhuman energy, was sustaining the brunt of the fight. Many officers of distinction had fallen. Col. Davis rode forward to examine the position of the enemy, and concluding that the best way to arrest our fugitives woul
he enemy forget, probably, that men of the same heroic daring and firm resolve are still alive; men who will prove to the world that they can neither be intimidated by threats, nor overawed by numbers. In reviewing Claiborne's Life and Times of Quitman, in DeBow's Review, the writer says: An episode may be here tolerated in regard to the conduct of the celebrated Mississippi Rifles, under charge of Colonel, now President Jefferson Davis, on the field of Buena Vista. The great movement tructive fire. This broke his right line, and the rest soon gave way and fled back precipitately. Here Col. Davis was severely wounded." After this lengthy extract in regard to the heroic conduct of Davis, we shall soon pass to the acts of Quitman at the gates of Mexico; but before doing so, we will be permitted a momentary notice of the behavior of the South Carolina regiment under the fire of the Mexican enemy. Those who sneer at Carolina courage and virtues are, in general, too ignora
Wellington (search for this): article 6
e world that they can neither be intimidated by threats, nor overawed by numbers. In reviewing Claiborne's Life and Times of Quitman, in DeBow's Review, the writer says: An episode may be here tolerated in regard to the conduct of the celebrated Mississippi Rifles, under charge of Colonel, now President Jefferson Davis, on the field of Buena Vista. The great movement then made by Davis is said to have been without previous parallel in the art of war, and was regarded by the Duke of Wellington as new and masterly. It was subsequently made, we learn on the authority of Gen. Cushing, on the fields of the Crimes. "The battle had been raging some time with fluctuating fortunes, and was setting against us, when Gen. Taylor, with Col. Davis and others, arrived on the field Several regiments (which were subsequently rallied, and fought bravely,) were in full retreat; O'Brien, after having his men and horses completely cut up, had been compelled to draw off the guns, and Bragg, with al
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 6
sippi Rifles, under charge of Colonel, now President Jefferson Davis, on the field of Buena Vista. The great movement then made by Davis is said to have been without previous parallel in the art of war, and was regarded bnd was setting against us, when Gen. Taylor, with Col. Davis and others, arrived on the field Several regimentfight. Many officers of distinction had fallen. Col. Davis rode forward to examine the position of the enemyhe Mexicans fled in confusion to their reserves, and Davis seized the commanding position they had occupied. Hshadow of the fate that was impending over them. Col. Davis had thrown his men into the form of a re-entering large force on the right for their final attack, Col. Davis was ordered in that direction. His regiment had soon gave way and fled back precipitately. Here Col. Davis was severely wounded." After this lengthy extract in regard to the heroic conduct of Davis, we shall soon pass to the acts of Quitman at the gates of Mexic
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