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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 8, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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France (France) (search for this): article 12
An offer of Mediation from France. "Ralph Easel," the well-informed Paris correspondent of the New York Express, communicates to that paper the following statemeat sections of the American Union, and asked whether the friendly mediation of France would be acceptable if the offer were made. Mr. Faulkner replied that he posseng that, if the interposition of any foreign power would be admissible, that of France, the nation which had aided the Thirteen Colonies in their early struggle for iNorth and the South, as most worthy of their mutual confidence; particularly as France had never, directly or indirectly, manifested any desire to meddle in the domesons which are the causes of the present troubles; but the amicable mediation of France might have the effect of inducing a suspension of hostilities, and enable the Nbrothers, he would esteem it a high privilege to offer the friendly counsels of France. You may rely upon these important details as perfectly correct. Mr. Dayt
United States (United States) (search for this): article 12
Ralph Easel," the well-informed Paris correspondent of the New York Express, communicates to that paper the following statement, under date of May 14: On Sunday last the Emperor Napoleon received Mr. Charles J. Faulkner, Minister of the United States to the Court of France, who had demanded an audience, for the purpose of presenting his letters of recall. The interview took place in the throne room, at the Palace of the Tuileries. After some preliminary remarks of a personal character, l Government, would certainly be looked upon, by both the North and the South, as most worthy of their mutual confidence; particularly as France had never, directly or indirectly, manifested any desire to meddle in the domestic affairs of the United States, and had always exhibited a sincere and disinterested sympathy for the whole Union, irrespective of section. The American people, he was certain, would not refer to the arbitration of any European Power the questions which are the causes
Power the questions which are the causes of the present troubles; but the amicable mediation of France might have the effect of inducing a suspension of hostilities, and enable the North and South to settle their differences without the effusion of fraternal blood. The Emperor said he feared it might now be too late, and that civil strife had gone too far to be stopped by an appeal to the dictates of reason; but, if he could be the means of averting the horrors of a war between American brothers, he would esteem it a high privilege to offer the friendly counsels of France. You may rely upon these important details as perfectly correct. Mr. Dayton has arrived in Paris, and will probably have an audience of the Emperor next Sunday. If our new Minister, whose position becomes most responsible, should express views similar to those of his predecessor — and the Emperor will doubtless ask his opinions on the same points — an immediate offer of French mediation may be anticipated
An offer of Mediation from France. "Ralph Easel," the well-informed Paris correspondent of the New York Express, communicates to that paper the following statement, under date of May 14: On Sunday last the Emperor Napoleon received Mr. Charles J. Faulkner, Minister of the United States to the Court of France, who had demanded an audience, for the purpose of presenting his letters of recall. The interview took place in the throne room, at the Palace of the Tuileries. After some preliminary remarks of a personal character, the Emperor unreservedly expressed to Mr. Faulkner his profound regret at the unhappy dissensions now existing between the two great sections of the American Union, and asked whether the friendly mediation of France would be acceptable if the offer were made. Mr. Faulkner replied that he possessed no information of a character to warrant him in giving a direct opinion; but he had no hesitation in declaring that, if the interposition of any foreign power
Charles J. Faulkner (search for this): article 12
dent of the New York Express, communicates to that paper the following statement, under date of May 14: On Sunday last the Emperor Napoleon received Mr. Charles J. Faulkner, Minister of the United States to the Court of France, who had demanded an audience, for the purpose of presenting his letters of recall. The interview took place in the throne room, at the Palace of the Tuileries. After some preliminary remarks of a personal character, the Emperor unreservedly expressed to Mr. Faulkner his profound regret at the unhappy dissensions now existing between the two great sections of the American Union, and asked whether the friendly mediation of France would be acceptable if the offer were made. Mr. Faulkner replied that he possessed no information of a character to warrant him in giving a direct opinion; but he had no hesitation in declaring that, if the interposition of any foreign power would be admissible, that of France, the nation which had aided the Thirteen Colonies
An offer of Mediation from France. "Ralph Easel," the well-informed Paris correspondent of the New York Express, communicates to that paper the following statement, under date of May 14: On Sunday last the Emperor Napoleon received Mr. Charles J. Faulkner, Minister of the United States to the Court of France, who had demanded an audience, for the purpose of presenting his letters of recall. The interview took place in the throne room, at the Palace of the Tuileries. After some preliminary remarks of a personal character, the Emperor unreservedly expressed to Mr. Faulkner his profound regret at the unhappy dissensions now existing between the two great sections of the American Union, and asked whether the friendly mediation of France would be acceptable if the offer were made. Mr. Faulkner replied that he possessed no information of a character to warrant him in giving a direct opinion; but he had no hesitation in declaring that, if the interposition of any foreign power