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Old Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 19
the overwhelming defeat, upon the public mind in that section. While much of it is untrue, enough is apparent to show that they begin to have some idea of Southern bravery and prowess. We commence one narration with accounts from the Baltimore papers of June 12th, which are, indeed, more nearly accurate than any that follow; although the "Associated Press" narrative, revised by Gen. Butler, is a weak attempt to gloss over a disastrous event: [From the Baltimore Sun, June 12th.] Old Point, June 10, 1861.--At a late hour on Sunday night Gen. Pierce, left with about five thousand men, a part of which consisted of a German regiment (Col. Benedict) from New York, and one of the Albany regiments, (Col. Townsend.) and the Zouave Regiment, Col. Duryea. The column was divided, and before reaching the Great Bethel bridge they met, and mistaking each other for the enemy, began a fight. The Albany regiment soon gave way and ran. Two were killed and nine wounded.--The mistake was
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 19
d about fifty or one hundred of the troops were killed and two hundred wounded. The battle began about four o'clock in the morning, and continued for three hours, when the Federal troops were driven back. Great excitement exists at Fortress Monroe, and Gen. Pierce is censured for having exposed his men to the destroying fire of the Confederates for such a length of time. The troops returned to Fortress Monroe, and it was thought another effort would be made to dislodge the Confeda length of time. The troops returned to Fortress Monroe, and it was thought another effort would be made to dislodge the Confederates from their position. The battle was on the road leading to Yorktown, where there is said to be a large reserve force ready to reinforce the forces at the bridge. The Maryland Guards and City Guards, of Baltimore, are supposed to have assisted in the defence of the battery, as they were ordered to that neighborhood from Richmond nearly two weeks ago.
counts from the Baltimore papers of June 12th, which are, indeed, more nearly accurate than any that follow; although the "Associated Press" narrative, revised by Gen. Butler, is a weak attempt to gloss over a disastrous event: [From the Baltimore Sun, June 12th.] Old Point, June 10, 1861.--At a late hour on Sunday night Gen. Pierce, left with about five thousand men, a part of which consisted of a German regiment (Col. Benedict) from New York, and one of the Albany regiments, (Col. Townsend.) and the Zouave Regiment, Col. Duryea. The column was divided, and before reaching the Great Bethel bridge they met, and mistaking each other for the enemy, began a fight. The Albany regiment soon gave way and ran. Two were killed and nine wounded.--The mistake was then discovered, and the entire column was reformed and marched towards the bridge, where it was said some four hundred of the Confederate forces were lodged. On reaching the creek it was found that the Confederate
Gen Pierce (search for this): article 19
an any that follow; although the "Associated Press" narrative, revised by Gen. Butler, is a weak attempt to gloss over a disastrous event: [From the Baltimore Sun, June 12th.] Old Point, June 10, 1861.--At a late hour on Sunday night Gen. Pierce, left with about five thousand men, a part of which consisted of a German regiment (Col. Benedict) from New York, and one of the Albany regiments, (Col. Townsend.) and the Zouave Regiment, Col. Duryea. The column was divided, and before reache hundred of the troops were killed and two hundred wounded. The battle began about four o'clock in the morning, and continued for three hours, when the Federal troops were driven back. Great excitement exists at Fortress Monroe, and Gen. Pierce is censured for having exposed his men to the destroying fire of the Confederates for such a length of time. The troops returned to Fortress Monroe, and it was thought another effort would be made to dislodge the Confederates from their p
here it was said some four hundred of the Confederate forces were lodged. On reaching the creek it was found that the Confederates had destroyed the bridge, but the whole Federal column was thrown on the bank of the creek. At that moment a masked battery from the opposite side of the bridge opened its fire with deadly effect on the Federal troops. Two pieces of artillery were then directed against the battery, but without doing it any perceptible damage. In the engagement Lieut. Greble and Major Winthrop, of the Federal forces, were killed, and about fifty or one hundred of the troops were killed and two hundred wounded. The battle began about four o'clock in the morning, and continued for three hours, when the Federal troops were driven back. Great excitement exists at Fortress Monroe, and Gen. Pierce is censured for having exposed his men to the destroying fire of the Confederates for such a length of time. The troops returned to Fortress Monroe, and i
Southern bravery and prowess. We commence one narration with accounts from the Baltimore papers of June 12th, which are, indeed, more nearly accurate than any that follow; although the "Associated Press" narrative, revised by Gen. Butler, is a weak attempt to gloss over a disastrous event: [From the Baltimore Sun, June 12th.] Old Point, June 10, 1861.--At a late hour on Sunday night Gen. Pierce, left with about five thousand men, a part of which consisted of a German regiment (Col. Benedict) from New York, and one of the Albany regiments, (Col. Townsend.) and the Zouave Regiment, Col. Duryea. The column was divided, and before reaching the Great Bethel bridge they met, and mistaking each other for the enemy, began a fight. The Albany regiment soon gave way and ran. Two were killed and nine wounded.--The mistake was then discovered, and the entire column was reformed and marched towards the bridge, where it was said some four hundred of the Confederate forces were lodg
Bombastes Furioso Butler (search for this): article 19
the 10th of June, together with newspaper comments thereon, showing to some extent the impression produced, by the overwhelming defeat, upon the public mind in that section. While much of it is untrue, enough is apparent to show that they begin to have some idea of Southern bravery and prowess. We commence one narration with accounts from the Baltimore papers of June 12th, which are, indeed, more nearly accurate than any that follow; although the "Associated Press" narrative, revised by Gen. Butler, is a weak attempt to gloss over a disastrous event: [From the Baltimore Sun, June 12th.] Old Point, June 10, 1861.--At a late hour on Sunday night Gen. Pierce, left with about five thousand men, a part of which consisted of a German regiment (Col. Benedict) from New York, and one of the Albany regiments, (Col. Townsend.) and the Zouave Regiment, Col. Duryea. The column was divided, and before reaching the Great Bethel bridge they met, and mistaking each other for the enemy, be
12th, which are, indeed, more nearly accurate than any that follow; although the "Associated Press" narrative, revised by Gen. Butler, is a weak attempt to gloss over a disastrous event: [From the Baltimore Sun, June 12th.] Old Point, June 10, 1861.--At a late hour on Sunday night Gen. Pierce, left with about five thousand men, a part of which consisted of a German regiment (Col. Benedict) from New York, and one of the Albany regiments, (Col. Townsend.) and the Zouave Regiment, Col. Duryea. The column was divided, and before reaching the Great Bethel bridge they met, and mistaking each other for the enemy, began a fight. The Albany regiment soon gave way and ran. Two were killed and nine wounded.--The mistake was then discovered, and the entire column was reformed and marched towards the bridge, where it was said some four hundred of the Confederate forces were lodged. On reaching the creek it was found that the Confederates had destroyed the bridge, but the whol
ome four hundred of the Confederate forces were lodged. On reaching the creek it was found that the Confederates had destroyed the bridge, but the whole Federal column was thrown on the bank of the creek. At that moment a masked battery from the opposite side of the bridge opened its fire with deadly effect on the Federal troops. Two pieces of artillery were then directed against the battery, but without doing it any perceptible damage. In the engagement Lieut. Greble and Major Winthrop, of the Federal forces, were killed, and about fifty or one hundred of the troops were killed and two hundred wounded. The battle began about four o'clock in the morning, and continued for three hours, when the Federal troops were driven back. Great excitement exists at Fortress Monroe, and Gen. Pierce is censured for having exposed his men to the destroying fire of the Confederates for such a length of time. The troops returned to Fortress Monroe, and it was thought anoth
June 10th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 19
ing defeat, upon the public mind in that section. While much of it is untrue, enough is apparent to show that they begin to have some idea of Southern bravery and prowess. We commence one narration with accounts from the Baltimore papers of June 12th, which are, indeed, more nearly accurate than any that follow; although the "Associated Press" narrative, revised by Gen. Butler, is a weak attempt to gloss over a disastrous event: [From the Baltimore Sun, June 12th.] Old Point, June 10, 1861.--At a late hour on Sunday night Gen. Pierce, left with about five thousand men, a part of which consisted of a German regiment (Col. Benedict) from New York, and one of the Albany regiments, (Col. Townsend.) and the Zouave Regiment, Col. Duryea. The column was divided, and before reaching the Great Bethel bridge they met, and mistaking each other for the enemy, began a fight. The Albany regiment soon gave way and ran. Two were killed and nine wounded.--The mistake was then discover
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