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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 23
d Gen. Butler had ordinary prudence, or his subordinate, Gen. Pierce, courage and presence of mind, the calamity would have been spared. But neither seems to have supplied the absence of military experience, with the simplest exhibition of prevision, practical judgment, and soldierly conduct; and hence this mischievous reverse. Government, we cannot doubt, will make thorough inquiry into the affair. If the facts be as they appear upon a first presentation, the sooner this brace of Massachusetts barristers are dismissed to their special pleadings, replications, and demurrers — the petty warfare of the bar, at which they are expert — the better it will be for the country. It is possible such men might in time be schooled into generalship, but the education is too costly. The people will not consent that their best and bravest — the patriots who first has steed to the protection of the Union, and the soldiers who in the very hour of peril, proved how much too valuable they are t<
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 23
of the Albany regiment, which fled from a supposed enemy, when only one man had been shot? This whole story is incredible. That a regiment of a thousand men should, within fair striking distance, fire upon a similar body nine rounds--nine thousand shots --and only kill one man, is a story which Abolitionists may believe, as it comes from their party, but reasonable men can hardly swallow so monstrous a story. [From the Philadelphia Press, 12th] We have learned a lesson in Southeastern Virginia, and experience has charged us an unusually dear price. Some three or four thousand Federal troops left Fortress Monroe on Sunday night, for the purpose of taking a rebel battery at a place called Great Bethel, about nine miles from Hampton. The erection of the battery was evidently part of a plan to environ the Fortress and to strengthen the defensive works of our enemies. It was found, on making the attack, that the Federal troops were unable to cope with the well fortifie
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 23
hat might be expected in an attempt to capture their former masters, Brigadier General Butler wisely determined to ensconce himself safely behind the walls of Fortress Monroe, and to leave to General Pierce and his subordinate officers all the perils attendant upon the new conquest, of which he felt certain of being adroit enough t We have learned a lesson in Southeastern Virginia, and experience has charged us an unusually dear price. Some three or four thousand Federal troops left Fortress Monroe on Sunday night, for the purpose of taking a rebel battery at a place called Great Bethel, about nine miles from Hampton. The erection of the battery wmen start out at night to unmask some batteries which the rebels, it was believed, had erected between Hampton and Yorktown, outside of Gen. Butler's lines at Fortress Monroe. The danger of night attacks is that, unless great caution observed, the columns, if in detached commands, are likely to encounter each other.--This is the
e field movements of our troops to the educated officers of the regular Army, or the deplorable event of Monday may prove to be but the beginning of a bad end.--While the astute chieftains of the Rebel Government are offering premiums for regularly educated officers, our War Department is perilling the lives of our brave men by placing them in charge of political incompetents — The Confederates take their trained Captains and Majors, and wisely make them Colonels and Generals. Such are their Lees, Braggs and Beauregard. But our War Minister leaves the educated and tried officers just as be finds them — Lieutenants, Captains and Majors — and seeks for his Colonels and Generals in such material as Petriken and Sanderson. General Cummings, we believe, has not yet been commissioned, and who is responsible for General Pierce we are not yet informed. [From the Philadelphia Ledger, 12th] The affair at Bethel appears to us to show a degree of blundering which must be attributed to<
Beauregard (search for this): article 23
our troops to the educated officers of the regular Army, or the deplorable event of Monday may prove to be but the beginning of a bad end.--While the astute chieftains of the Rebel Government are offering premiums for regularly educated officers, our War Department is perilling the lives of our brave men by placing them in charge of political incompetents — The Confederates take their trained Captains and Majors, and wisely make them Colonels and Generals. Such are their Lees, Braggs and Beauregard. But our War Minister leaves the educated and tried officers just as be finds them — Lieutenants, Captains and Majors — and seeks for his Colonels and Generals in such material as Petriken and Sanderson. General Cummings, we believe, has not yet been commissioned, and who is responsible for General Pierce we are not yet informed. [From the Philadelphia Ledger, 12th] The affair at Bethel appears to us to show a degree of blundering which must be attributed to nothing else than w<
Dred Scott (search for this): article 23
esson. There are some who talk of a war of p ts and skirmishes — of strategy and endurance. This failure is an answer to all such. Behind a breastwork, poor soldiers are nearly equal to good ones, since flight is often more dangerous than persistence, while discipline goes for little; good marksmanship is the main point. No, the Union is not to be saved by any system of petty warfare. It we have no better recourse, we may as well give it up. "Ah!" says a shrewd one, "you want Gen. Scott to offer battle whether he is ready or not" No, sir; we want him not to give battle till he is perfectly ready. He understands all that business a great deal better than we do, or ever will. But we do want him to be at the head of a force with which he can not only offer battle when he thinks at, but compel the enemy to accept it. That is the whole story. It he thinks 50,000 men enough to walk right over the rebels, then 50,000 he it, in spite of our demurrers. If he wants 100,000 imme
Gen Pierce (search for this): article 23
elf safely behind the walls of Fortress Monroe, and to leave to General Pierce and his subordinate officers all the perils attendant upon the d at double that number. The blame is of course, attributed to General Pierce, who is charged by Butler with having "lost his presence of mind and slain before the mistake was corrected. We are told that General Pierce lost his presence of mind on the field of battle, and the infer unconfirmed authority of a telegraphic reporter, and justice to Gen. Pierce requires us to await the facts before we pass an opinion on his ieve, has not yet been commissioned, and who is responsible for General Pierce we are not yet informed. [From the Philadelphia Ledger, 12 seem to have induced greater caution, for we find the commander, Gen Pierce, attacking a masked battery of thirty rifled cannon without apparces. Had Gen. Butler had ordinary prudence, or his subordinate, Gen. Pierce, courage and presence of mind, the calamity would have been spar
ginia, and experience has charged us an unusually dear price. Some three or four thousand Federal troops left Fortress Monroe on Sunday night, for the purpose of taking a rebel battery at a place called Great Bethel, about nine miles from Hampton. The erection of the battery was evidently part of a plan to environ the Fortress and to strengthen the defensive works of our enemies. It was found, on making the attack, that the Federal troops were unable to cope with the well fortified Rebappears to us to show a degree of blundering which must be attributed to nothing else than want of skill in the officers. Over three thousand men start out at night to unmask some batteries which the rebels, it was believed, had erected between Hampton and Yorktown, outside of Gen. Butler's lines at Fortress Monroe. The danger of night attacks is that, unless great caution observed, the columns, if in detached commands, are likely to encounter each other.--This is the case in this affair, a
Louis Napoleon (search for this): article 23
et them be forth coming at the earliest possible day. But, in any case, let the requisite number be mustered forth with, and "Forward March " the word until the rebels are chased in Texas, and the rebellion put down. If we are whipped in a fair fight, let us give it up, and make our peace accordingly. But let ready forthwith to do our best, and being ready, let us make the shortest possible word of this treason. Guerrilla warfare is formidable against, weak or purposeless commanders; Napoleon in person was never troubled by it. The General who knows how to win great battle knows how to compel his adversary to fight one. And it is only by great battles — at least, by movements that look and offer such — that this rebellion is to be extinguished. So much for the lesson of Great Bethel. [From the New York Times.] An expedition thus literally and figuratively in the dark could only end in disaster. Setting aside, indeed, all dictates of military science, the plain
premiums for regularly educated officers, our War Department is perilling the lives of our brave men by placing them in charge of political incompetents — The Confederates take their trained Captains and Majors, and wisely make them Colonels and Generals. Such are their Lees, Braggs and Beauregard. But our War Minister leaves the educated and tried officers just as be finds them — Lieutenants, Captains and Majors — and seeks for his Colonels and Generals in such material as Petriken and Sanderson. General Cummings, we believe, has not yet been commissioned, and who is responsible for General Pierce we are not yet informed. [From the Philadelphia Ledger, 12th] The affair at Bethel appears to us to show a degree of blundering which must be attributed to nothing else than want of skill in the officers. Over three thousand men start out at night to unmask some batteries which the rebels, it was believed, had erected between Hampton and Yorktown, outside of Gen. Butler's lin<
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