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Warren (Colorado, United States) (search for this): article 24
ted gallantly, and Lieut. G. was shot dead while working one of his guns. He had three 12-pound howitzers. He is said to have relations in Baltimore, and was highly esteemed by his fellow-officers. The force of the Confederates in the conflict is variously estimated at from eight hundred to twenty-five hundred, and was said to be an advance body from the forces at Yorktown. The Federal officers who particularly distinguished themselves for bravery were Col. Duryea, Lieut. Col. Warren, Col. Townsend, Maj. Davis, Lieut. Greble and Capt. Kilpatrick--all of whom, except Townsend and Greble, are attached to the Zouave Regiment, which went through the battle with remarkable bravery Captain Fitzpatrick was among the wounded. The belief here is that the Confederate forces were under the command of Col. Magruder, and their guns did fearful execution. The battery was evidently hastily constructed, and two of its guns were removed to more favorable positions while the battle was
Old Point (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 24
s to General Pierce, who was reported missing, is said to have reached Newport News-point in safety. He gave the order to charge on the battery, when the fearful havoc of his troops took place. [Correspondence of the Baltimore Sun.] Old Point Comfort, June 11. The first battle between the contending forces of the United States and the Confederate States has taken place, resulting in the defeat of the former. At midnight on Sunday about nineteen hundred men advanced from Newport News-point and three thousand from Old Point Comfort, with an arrangement to meet near Newmarket Bridge, where they would conjoin under the command of Brig. Gen. Pierce, of Mass., for the purpose of checking the incursions of a corps of Virginia dragoons who had arranged the pickets in the vicinity of Hampton. A part of the troops from Newport Newspoint mistaking the Federal troops for the Southern forces, at about three o'clock in the morning, opened fire on them, and killed several, be
United States (United States) (search for this): article 24
in safety. He gave the order to charge on the battery, when the fearful havoc of his troops took place. [Correspondence of the Baltimore Sun.] Old Point Comfort, June 11. The first battle between the contending forces of the United States and the Confederate States has taken place, resulting in the defeat of the former. At midnight on Sunday about nineteen hundred men advanced from Newport News-point and three thousand from Old Point Comfort, with an arrangement to meet near Confederate States has taken place, resulting in the defeat of the former. At midnight on Sunday about nineteen hundred men advanced from Newport News-point and three thousand from Old Point Comfort, with an arrangement to meet near Newmarket Bridge, where they would conjoin under the command of Brig. Gen. Pierce, of Mass., for the purpose of checking the incursions of a corps of Virginia dragoons who had arranged the pickets in the vicinity of Hampton. A part of the troops from Newport Newspoint mistaking the Federal troops for the Southern forces, at about three o'clock in the morning, opened fire on them, and killed several, besides wounding quite a number. This revealed their approach to the Confederates, and the
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 24
ccounts. The Baltimore Sun, of Thursday, contains some additional particulars. It appears that the officials at Fortress Monroe are making an effort to conceal the amount of their loss from the public eye at the North, fearing doubtless that the Confederates after the battle. The Sun says: the late Settle. Such was the condition of affairs at Fortress Monroe that but few additional particulars could be obtained of the battle of Monday morning at Great Bethel. It was learn to fall from his horse. The number of killed and wounded is not definitely ascertained, but it was admitted at Fortress Monroe to have been an unusually large per centage of the force. The troops are said to have exhibited great bravery, but en the communication between that and Hampton. A large number of wounded had been brought in to the hospital at Fortress Monroe, many of whom were fatally injured. On Tuesday two of the wounded died. A passenger by the Georgeanna stated that
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 24
roops took place. [Correspondence of the Baltimore Sun.] Old Point Comfort, June 11. The first battle between the contending forces of the United States and the Confederate States has taken place, resulting in the defeat of the former. At midnight on Sunday about nineteen hundred men advanced from Newport News-point and three thousand from Old Point Comfort, with an arrangement to meet near Newmarket Bridge, where they would conjoin under the command of Brig. Gen. Pierce, of Mass., for the purpose of checking the incursions of a corps of Virginia dragoons who had arranged the pickets in the vicinity of Hampton. A part of the troops from Newport Newspoint mistaking the Federal troops for the Southern forces, at about three o'clock in the morning, opened fire on them, and killed several, besides wounding quite a number. This revealed their approach to the Confederates, and the delay caused by the confusion resulting from the mistake, enabled the Confederates to th
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 24
tre, bending it so that the ends nearly came together, and the following ball took off the head of the soldier who had lost his musket. After the retreat of the Federal troops began, the cavalry of the Confederates followed them nearly into Hampton village, and then retired. There was no intention expressed at the Fortress to send out another force to the scene of battle, as it was thought the Confederates would remove their position, and if it should be captured, it would require a fh an arrangement to meet near Newmarket Bridge, where they would conjoin under the command of Brig. Gen. Pierce, of Mass., for the purpose of checking the incursions of a corps of Virginia dragoons who had arranged the pickets in the vicinity of Hampton. A part of the troops from Newport Newspoint mistaking the Federal troops for the Southern forces, at about three o'clock in the morning, opened fire on them, and killed several, besides wounding quite a number. This revealed their approac
Judson Kilpatrick (search for this): article 24
g one of his guns. He had three 12-pound howitzers. He is said to have relations in Baltimore, and was highly esteemed by his fellow-officers. The force of the Confederates in the conflict is variously estimated at from eight hundred to twenty-five hundred, and was said to be an advance body from the forces at Yorktown. The Federal officers who particularly distinguished themselves for bravery were Col. Duryea, Lieut. Col. Warren, Col. Townsend, Maj. Davis, Lieut. Greble and Capt. Kilpatrick--all of whom, except Townsend and Greble, are attached to the Zouave Regiment, which went through the battle with remarkable bravery Captain Fitzpatrick was among the wounded. The belief here is that the Confederate forces were under the command of Col. Magruder, and their guns did fearful execution. The battery was evidently hastily constructed, and two of its guns were removed to more favorable positions while the battle was going on, so that the woods in which the Federal troop
anna stated that twenty-five Zouaves, besides those known to have been killed and wounded, were still missing. Two who had separated themselves from the regiment in the retreat, came into the Fortress on Tuesday afternoon, but could give no account of their missing comrades. A good deal of depression is said to be exhibited among the Federal troops because of the defeat, but they do not lack the courage to renew the contest as soon as they receive the word of command to march. Major Winthrop, one of the aids to General Pierce, who was reported missing, is said to have reached Newport News-point in safety. He gave the order to charge on the battery, when the fearful havoc of his troops took place. [Correspondence of the Baltimore Sun.] Old Point Comfort, June 11. The first battle between the contending forces of the United States and the Confederate States has taken place, resulting in the defeat of the former. At midnight on Sunday about nineteen hundred me
President Davis (search for this): article 24
ut. G. was shot dead while working one of his guns. He had three 12-pound howitzers. He is said to have relations in Baltimore, and was highly esteemed by his fellow-officers. The force of the Confederates in the conflict is variously estimated at from eight hundred to twenty-five hundred, and was said to be an advance body from the forces at Yorktown. The Federal officers who particularly distinguished themselves for bravery were Col. Duryea, Lieut. Col. Warren, Col. Townsend, Maj. Davis, Lieut. Greble and Capt. Kilpatrick--all of whom, except Townsend and Greble, are attached to the Zouave Regiment, which went through the battle with remarkable bravery Captain Fitzpatrick was among the wounded. The belief here is that the Confederate forces were under the command of Col. Magruder, and their guns did fearful execution. The battery was evidently hastily constructed, and two of its guns were removed to more favorable positions while the battle was going on, so that the
A. Whiting (search for this): article 24
ps of Virginia dragoons who had arranged the pickets in the vicinity of Hampton. A part of the troops from Newport Newspoint mistaking the Federal troops for the Southern forces, at about three o'clock in the morning, opened fire on them, and killed several, besides wounding quite a number. This revealed their approach to the Confederates, and the delay caused by the confusion resulting from the mistake, enabled the Confederates to thoroughly prepare for them. While on the march, Capt. A. Whiting, of Hampton, who was on picket duty, was captured. He is represented to be a splendid specimen of manhood, and his bearing and courage elicited the admiration of the Federal officers. Another picket was discovered and fired on, but he escaped. After order was restored among the Federal troops, they advanced rapidly towards Great Bethel, unconscious of any formidable opposing force. Upon approaching the brink of the narrow creek which separated them from those lying in wait for t
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