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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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France (France) (search for this): article 24
is press silenced. For exercising the dearest right of a freeman — freedom of speech — the tyranny of a despotic ruler is brought to bear against him, and he is deprived of his personal liberty. This act of the Abolition agents of the central power exceeds in atrocity the tyranny of old John Adams under the odious sedition laws of 1800, and Mr. Tucker is the subject of a greater indignity than was Mathew Lyon, of revolutionary memory. The latter was placed in durance under the operation of a tyranical law, which, although passed by Congress, was condemned by the people as soon as their voice could be expressed; Mr. Tucker is the victim of a tyrani's will which seems destined to become, wherever his power is recognized, absolute. In America, as in France, the press to in only reflect the wishes of the Government — the interests of the governed must be lost sight of. The Bastile is transferred to the free (!) North, and henceforth the watchword must be is Old Abe App
The Press to be Muzzled. --For daring to oppose the unconstitutional war policy of the Abolition Administration, Mr. Tucker, editor of the St. Louis State Journal, has, the telegraph informs us been arrested by the Abolition agents at St. Louis. For daring to write and print his thoughts, he is deemed guilty of treason and iberty. This act of the Abolition agents of the central power exceeds in atrocity the tyranny of old John Adams under the odious sedition laws of 1800, and Mr. Tucker is the subject of a greater indignity than was Mathew Lyon, of revolutionary memory. The latter was placed in durance under the operation of a tyranical law, which, although passed by Congress, was condemned by the people as soon as their voice could be expressed; Mr. Tucker is the victim of a tyrani's will which seems destined to become, wherever his power is recognized, absolute. In America, as in France, the press to in only reflect the wishes of the Government — the interests of th
Mathew Lyon (search for this): article 24
ouis. For daring to write and print his thoughts, he is deemed guilty of treason and his press silenced. For exercising the dearest right of a freeman — freedom of speech — the tyranny of a despotic ruler is brought to bear against him, and he is deprived of his personal liberty. This act of the Abolition agents of the central power exceeds in atrocity the tyranny of old John Adams under the odious sedition laws of 1800, and Mr. Tucker is the subject of a greater indignity than was Mathew Lyon, of revolutionary memory. The latter was placed in durance under the operation of a tyranical law, which, although passed by Congress, was condemned by the people as soon as their voice could be expressed; Mr. Tucker is the victim of a tyrani's will which seems destined to become, wherever his power is recognized, absolute. In America, as in France, the press to in only reflect the wishes of the Government — the interests of the governed must be lost sight of. The Bastile is transf<
John Adams (search for this): article 24
ditor of the St. Louis State Journal, has, the telegraph informs us been arrested by the Abolition agents at St. Louis. For daring to write and print his thoughts, he is deemed guilty of treason and his press silenced. For exercising the dearest right of a freeman — freedom of speech — the tyranny of a despotic ruler is brought to bear against him, and he is deprived of his personal liberty. This act of the Abolition agents of the central power exceeds in atrocity the tyranny of old John Adams under the odious sedition laws of 1800, and Mr. Tucker is the subject of a greater indignity than was Mathew Lyon, of revolutionary memory. The latter was placed in durance under the operation of a tyranical law, which, although passed by Congress, was condemned by the people as soon as their voice could be expressed; Mr. Tucker is the victim of a tyrani's will which seems destined to become, wherever his power is recognized, absolute. In America, as in France, the press to in only refle
the telegraph informs us been arrested by the Abolition agents at St. Louis. For daring to write and print his thoughts, he is deemed guilty of treason and his press silenced. For exercising the dearest right of a freeman — freedom of speech — the tyranny of a despotic ruler is brought to bear against him, and he is deprived of his personal liberty. This act of the Abolition agents of the central power exceeds in atrocity the tyranny of old John Adams under the odious sedition laws of 1800, and Mr. Tucker is the subject of a greater indignity than was Mathew Lyon, of revolutionary memory. The latter was placed in durance under the operation of a tyranical law, which, although passed by Congress, was condemned by the people as soon as their voice could be expressed; Mr. Tucker is the victim of a tyrani's will which seems destined to become, wherever his power is recognized, absolute. In America, as in France, the press to in only reflect the wishes of the Government — the inte<