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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 29
An Entertaining statement. --The New York Herald, of the 17th instant, has a long letter from Fortress Monroe, giving an account of the escape, from York county, of the wife and children of one Harvey Robins, a Yankee settler from the apprehended vengeance of the terrible Virginias. The writer goes on as follows: Mrs. Robins reports that there are about thirty thousand men between Yorktown and Big Bethel; that several companies had come down from Richmond to assist the rebels in base of another attack upon Big bethel. Her statement about the number of the troops between Yorktown and Big Bethel is also corroborated by the flag of truce which was sent out by Col. Duryea yesterday to look after the dead and wounded which were left behind, if any, (and some there were,) at the time of the retreat. This flag of truce was passed through Big Bethel blindfolded, of course, and escorted to Yorktown, where Col. Magruder treated them very kindly, but said, "Gentlemen, you cann
York county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 29
An Entertaining statement. --The New York Herald, of the 17th instant, has a long letter from Fortress Monroe, giving an account of the escape, from York county, of the wife and children of one Harvey Robins, a Yankee settler from the apprehended vengeance of the terrible Virginias. The writer goes on as follows: Mrs. Robins reports that there are about thirty thousand men between Yorktown and Big Bethel; that several companies had come down from Richmond to assist the rebels in base of another attack upon Big bethel. Her statement about the number of the troops between Yorktown and Big Bethel is also corroborated by the flag of truce which was sent out by Col. Duryea yesterday to look after the dead and wounded which were left behind, if any, (and some there were,) at the time of the retreat. This flag of truce was passed through Big Bethel blindfolded, of course, and escorted to Yorktown, where Col. Magruder treated them very kindly, but said, "Gentlemen, you cann
Harvey Robins (search for this): article 29
An Entertaining statement. --The New York Herald, of the 17th instant, has a long letter from Fortress Monroe, giving an account of the escape, from York county, of the wife and children of one Harvey Robins, a Yankee settler from the apprehended vengeance of the terrible Virginias. The writer goes on as follows: Mrs. Robins reports that there are about thirty thousand men between Yorktown and Big Bethel; that several companies had come down from Richmond to assist the rebels in baMrs. Robins reports that there are about thirty thousand men between Yorktown and Big Bethel; that several companies had come down from Richmond to assist the rebels in base of another attack upon Big bethel. Her statement about the number of the troops between Yorktown and Big Bethel is also corroborated by the flag of truce which was sent out by Col. Duryea yesterday to look after the dead and wounded which were left behind, if any, (and some there were,) at the time of the retreat. This flag of truce was passed through Big Bethel blindfolded, of course, and escorted to Yorktown, where Col. Magruder treated them very kindly, but said, "Gentlemen, you can
ren of one Harvey Robins, a Yankee settler from the apprehended vengeance of the terrible Virginias. The writer goes on as follows: Mrs. Robins reports that there are about thirty thousand men between Yorktown and Big Bethel; that several companies had come down from Richmond to assist the rebels in base of another attack upon Big bethel. Her statement about the number of the troops between Yorktown and Big Bethel is also corroborated by the flag of truce which was sent out by Col. Duryea yesterday to look after the dead and wounded which were left behind, if any, (and some there were,) at the time of the retreat. This flag of truce was passed through Big Bethel blindfolded, of course, and escorted to Yorktown, where Col. Magruder treated them very kindly, but said, "Gentlemen, you cannot be permitted to see either your wounded or prisoners" At this refusal, they returned last night and reported here this morning that the country from Big Bethel was bristling with bayonet
ompanies had come down from Richmond to assist the rebels in base of another attack upon Big bethel. Her statement about the number of the troops between Yorktown and Big Bethel is also corroborated by the flag of truce which was sent out by Col. Duryea yesterday to look after the dead and wounded which were left behind, if any, (and some there were,) at the time of the retreat. This flag of truce was passed through Big Bethel blindfolded, of course, and escorted to Yorktown, where Col. Magruder treated them very kindly, but said, "Gentlemen, you cannot be permitted to see either your wounded or prisoners" At this refusal, they returned last night and reported here this morning that the country from Big Bethel was bristling with bayonets. On the day of the retreat every effort was made to care for and bring off the wounded, but the rebels raised the black flag and fired a terrific volley upon the flag of truce. There is not a doubt entertained here but that the rebels murd
An Entertaining statement. --The New York Herald, of the 17th instant, has a long letter from Fortress Monroe, giving an account of the escape, from York county, of the wife and children of one Harvey Robins, a Yankee settler from the apprehended vengeance of the terrible Virginias. The writer goes on as follows: Mrs. Robins reports that there are about thirty thousand men between Yorktown and Big Bethel; that several companies had come down from Richmond to assist the rebels in base of another attack upon Big bethel. Her statement about the number of the troops between Yorktown and Big Bethel is also corroborated by the flag of truce which was sent out by Col. Duryea yesterday to look after the dead and wounded which were left behind, if any, (and some there were,) at the time of the retreat. This flag of truce was passed through Big Bethel blindfolded, of course, and escorted to Yorktown, where Col. Magruder treated them very kindly, but said, "Gentlemen, you canno