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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Bird's Point, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 33
into service, have been quietly "seceding" from St. Louis for weeks past. Our informant says that Gov. Jackson's recent proclamation is a move which has been in contemplation for some weeks; that they have been preparing for it at least three weeks, and that everywhere the people are flocking to the aid of the Governor. In a short time, Gov. Jackson will have a very considerable army, when the invaders will be driven from the soil. He says the Missourian in the interior are well armed with rifles, that they shot one eye when they shoot, and every shot is good for a man. The war in Missouri, he thinks, is destined to be one of extermination. He thinks the movement in Missouri is destined to have a most unfavorable effect upon the army at Calro and Bird's Point for the invasion of the Mississippi. It will take all their forces to "hold, occupy and possess," and subjugate the gallant people who are now rushing to arms for the expulsion of the Lincolnites.--Memphis Bulletin.
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 33
The revolution in Missouri. --We conversed with a gentleman yesterday, late from Missouri. He gives a most deplorable account of the condition of things in that State. He says that those in St. Louis suspected of Southern sympathies are treatMissouri. He gives a most deplorable account of the condition of things in that State. He says that those in St. Louis suspected of Southern sympathies are treated in the most offensive and insulting manner, and that they dare not resent any indignity, at the peril of their lives. He says that an order has been received at St. Louis to procure, by purchase or seizure, from twenty to thirty steamboats, for tnterior are well armed with rifles, that they shot one eye when they shoot, and every shot is good for a man. The war in Missouri, he thinks, is destined to be one of extermination. He thinks the movement in Missouri is destined to have a most unfavMissouri is destined to have a most unfavorable effect upon the army at Calro and Bird's Point for the invasion of the Mississippi. It will take all their forces to "hold, occupy and possess," and subjugate the gallant people who are now rushing to arms for the expulsion of the Lincolnites
George Jackson (search for this): article 33
he Association, and did so when only a few accepted the service. The large majority not only refused, but in order to avoid being impressed into service, have been quietly "seceding" from St. Louis for weeks past. Our informant says that Gov. Jackson's recent proclamation is a move which has been in contemplation for some weeks; that they have been preparing for it at least three weeks, and that everywhere the people are flocking to the aid of the Governor. In a short time, Gov. JacksGov. Jackson will have a very considerable army, when the invaders will be driven from the soil. He says the Missourian in the interior are well armed with rifles, that they shot one eye when they shoot, and every shot is good for a man. The war in Missouri, he thinks, is destined to be one of extermination. He thinks the movement in Missouri is destined to have a most unfavorable effect upon the army at Calro and Bird's Point for the invasion of the Mississippi. It will take all their forces to "hold,
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 33
f things in that State. He says that those in St. Louis suspected of Southern sympathies are treated in the most offensive and insulting manner, and that they dare not resent any indignity, at the peril of their lives. He says that an order has been received at St. Louis to procure, by purchase or seizure, from twenty to thirty steamboats, for the intended invasion of the Mississippi valley. Recently the Secretary of the Pilots' Association of St. Louis was summoned to the Arsenal, where Lincoln's mercenaries hold away. When there, they inquired if he could procure from 20 to 30 good Union men as pilots for the Government. He promised to bring the matter before the Association, and did so when only a few accepted the service. The large majority not only refused, but in order to avoid being impressed into service, have been quietly "seceding" from St. Louis for weeks past. Our informant says that Gov. Jackson's recent proclamation is a move which has been in contemplatio