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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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St. Johns (Michigan, United States) (search for this): article 8
The loss of the steamer Canadian -- Further Particulars.--By later intelligence from St. Johns, we learn that immediately after the collision of the steamer Canadian with the sunken ice berg, her head was turned shorewards, with steam on. In thirty five minutes, when all hopes of reaching the shore with the ship were lost, the boats were lowered and sent away full of people. Boat number eight upset, and all in her perished. Five minutes after the lowering of the boats the ship went down bow first, with a heavy plunge, in forty fathoms of water, and drew down all that were on board except six, who were picked up, one of whom died. At the time the ship went down there was a fearful explosion aft. The Captain's boat was about twenty feet from the ship when it sunk, and it was nearly swamped. Mr. Davis, second officer, went down with the ship; also, Mr. Panton, the mill officer, who was endeavoring to save the mails-- Only seven mail bags were saved The cabin passengers
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 8
on board except six, who were picked up, one of whom died. At the time the ship went down there was a fearful explosion aft. The Captain's boat was about twenty feet from the ship when it sunk, and it was nearly swamped. Mr. Davis, second officer, went down with the ship; also, Mr. Panton, the mill officer, who was endeavoring to save the mails-- Only seven mail bags were saved The cabin passengers known to be lost are as follows: Rev. Mr. Blount, lady and two children; Mr Mayhew, of Wisconsin, and Captain Wyckman. Not less than twenty of the steerage passengers, six of the cabin, and ten of the crew were lost. The passengers suffered considerably from sleeping in the hold of a salt laden French vessel The Canadian was an iron three decked propeller steamship of 2,000 tons burden, built in 1860 at Greenock, by J. Wood, the same who built the Canada, at the some place, and the Cannon shot at Providence.-- She was owned by the Canadian Steamship Company, and ran between Mon
Montreal (Canada) (search for this): article 8
nsin, and Captain Wyckman. Not less than twenty of the steerage passengers, six of the cabin, and ten of the crew were lost. The passengers suffered considerably from sleeping in the hold of a salt laden French vessel The Canadian was an iron three decked propeller steamship of 2,000 tons burden, built in 1860 at Greenock, by J. Wood, the same who built the Canada, at the some place, and the Cannon shot at Providence.-- She was owned by the Canadian Steamship Company, and ran between Montreal and Glasgow. Her securities against fire were good. She was medium model. She was rated No. 1, and carried sufficient canvas to enable her to make a port in case of disabled machinery. Her fastenings were of iron, and she drew twenty feet of water. Her engine was direct acting, 500 horse power. having two cylinders of 66 inches diameter, the stroke of piston being 45 inches. The boilers were tabular. She was bark rigged, having seven bulkheads, the diameter of the propeller being
Greenock (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 8
eavoring to save the mails-- Only seven mail bags were saved The cabin passengers known to be lost are as follows: Rev. Mr. Blount, lady and two children; Mr Mayhew, of Wisconsin, and Captain Wyckman. Not less than twenty of the steerage passengers, six of the cabin, and ten of the crew were lost. The passengers suffered considerably from sleeping in the hold of a salt laden French vessel The Canadian was an iron three decked propeller steamship of 2,000 tons burden, built in 1860 at Greenock, by J. Wood, the same who built the Canada, at the some place, and the Cannon shot at Providence.-- She was owned by the Canadian Steamship Company, and ran between Montreal and Glasgow. Her securities against fire were good. She was medium model. She was rated No. 1, and carried sufficient canvas to enable her to make a port in case of disabled machinery. Her fastenings were of iron, and she drew twenty feet of water. Her engine was direct acting, 500 horse power. having two cylin
Glasgow (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
aptain Wyckman. Not less than twenty of the steerage passengers, six of the cabin, and ten of the crew were lost. The passengers suffered considerably from sleeping in the hold of a salt laden French vessel The Canadian was an iron three decked propeller steamship of 2,000 tons burden, built in 1860 at Greenock, by J. Wood, the same who built the Canada, at the some place, and the Cannon shot at Providence.-- She was owned by the Canadian Steamship Company, and ran between Montreal and Glasgow. Her securities against fire were good. She was medium model. She was rated No. 1, and carried sufficient canvas to enable her to make a port in case of disabled machinery. Her fastenings were of iron, and she drew twenty feet of water. Her engine was direct acting, 500 horse power. having two cylinders of 66 inches diameter, the stroke of piston being 45 inches. The boilers were tabular. She was bark rigged, having seven bulkheads, the diameter of the propeller being 17 feet.
ave the mails-- Only seven mail bags were saved The cabin passengers known to be lost are as follows: Rev. Mr. Blount, lady and two children; Mr Mayhew, of Wisconsin, and Captain Wyckman. Not less than twenty of the steerage passengers, six of the cabin, and ten of the crew were lost. The passengers suffered considerably from sleeping in the hold of a salt laden French vessel The Canadian was an iron three decked propeller steamship of 2,000 tons burden, built in 1860 at Greenock, by J. Wood, the same who built the Canada, at the some place, and the Cannon shot at Providence.-- She was owned by the Canadian Steamship Company, and ran between Montreal and Glasgow. Her securities against fire were good. She was medium model. She was rated No. 1, and carried sufficient canvas to enable her to make a port in case of disabled machinery. Her fastenings were of iron, and she drew twenty feet of water. Her engine was direct acting, 500 horse power. having two cylinders of 66 i
George Davis (search for this): article 8
e lost, the boats were lowered and sent away full of people. Boat number eight upset, and all in her perished. Five minutes after the lowering of the boats the ship went down bow first, with a heavy plunge, in forty fathoms of water, and drew down all that were on board except six, who were picked up, one of whom died. At the time the ship went down there was a fearful explosion aft. The Captain's boat was about twenty feet from the ship when it sunk, and it was nearly swamped. Mr. Davis, second officer, went down with the ship; also, Mr. Panton, the mill officer, who was endeavoring to save the mails-- Only seven mail bags were saved The cabin passengers known to be lost are as follows: Rev. Mr. Blount, lady and two children; Mr Mayhew, of Wisconsin, and Captain Wyckman. Not less than twenty of the steerage passengers, six of the cabin, and ten of the crew were lost. The passengers suffered considerably from sleeping in the hold of a salt laden French vessel The Ca
all that were on board except six, who were picked up, one of whom died. At the time the ship went down there was a fearful explosion aft. The Captain's boat was about twenty feet from the ship when it sunk, and it was nearly swamped. Mr. Davis, second officer, went down with the ship; also, Mr. Panton, the mill officer, who was endeavoring to save the mails-- Only seven mail bags were saved The cabin passengers known to be lost are as follows: Rev. Mr. Blount, lady and two children; Mr Mayhew, of Wisconsin, and Captain Wyckman. Not less than twenty of the steerage passengers, six of the cabin, and ten of the crew were lost. The passengers suffered considerably from sleeping in the hold of a salt laden French vessel The Canadian was an iron three decked propeller steamship of 2,000 tons burden, built in 1860 at Greenock, by J. Wood, the same who built the Canada, at the some place, and the Cannon shot at Providence.-- She was owned by the Canadian Steamship Company, and r
x, who were picked up, one of whom died. At the time the ship went down there was a fearful explosion aft. The Captain's boat was about twenty feet from the ship when it sunk, and it was nearly swamped. Mr. Davis, second officer, went down with the ship; also, Mr. Panton, the mill officer, who was endeavoring to save the mails-- Only seven mail bags were saved The cabin passengers known to be lost are as follows: Rev. Mr. Blount, lady and two children; Mr Mayhew, of Wisconsin, and Captain Wyckman. Not less than twenty of the steerage passengers, six of the cabin, and ten of the crew were lost. The passengers suffered considerably from sleeping in the hold of a salt laden French vessel The Canadian was an iron three decked propeller steamship of 2,000 tons burden, built in 1860 at Greenock, by J. Wood, the same who built the Canada, at the some place, and the Cannon shot at Providence.-- She was owned by the Canadian Steamship Company, and ran between Montreal and Glasgow.
orty fathoms of water, and drew down all that were on board except six, who were picked up, one of whom died. At the time the ship went down there was a fearful explosion aft. The Captain's boat was about twenty feet from the ship when it sunk, and it was nearly swamped. Mr. Davis, second officer, went down with the ship; also, Mr. Panton, the mill officer, who was endeavoring to save the mails-- Only seven mail bags were saved The cabin passengers known to be lost are as follows: Rev. Mr. Blount, lady and two children; Mr Mayhew, of Wisconsin, and Captain Wyckman. Not less than twenty of the steerage passengers, six of the cabin, and ten of the crew were lost. The passengers suffered considerably from sleeping in the hold of a salt laden French vessel The Canadian was an iron three decked propeller steamship of 2,000 tons burden, built in 1860 at Greenock, by J. Wood, the same who built the Canada, at the some place, and the Cannon shot at Providence.-- She was owned by
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