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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 5
The Southern students at the North. A meeting of the medical students at New York took place on Friday night. There were about 150 present. A series of resolutions were offered, advocating the return home of the students. An exciting debate took place, from a report of which in the Herald we extract the following: Captain Morgan, of Tennessee, arose in an excited manner to address the meeting. He was in favor of the students returning at once to their homes. The contingency alluded to by Dr. Sims had arisen. South Carolina had seceded. [Loud cheers.] He would read a telegraphic dispatch which had just been received. The dispatch was as follows: Richmond, Nov. 9, 1860. F. G. Drake--Southern students — welcome Richmond. South Carolina has seceded.--[Cheers.] Now, then, is the time to go. [Renewed cheers] A Voice — That dispatch is not reliable.--[Voices--"It is."] When are these resolutions to be carried into effect? Are the students ready bef
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
e was in favor of the students returning at once to their homes. The contingency alluded to by Dr. Sims had arisen. South Carolina had seceded. [Loud cheers.] He would read a telegraphic dispatch which had just been received. The dispatch was as follows: Richmond, Nov. 9, 1860. F. G. Drake--Southern students — welcome Richmond. South Carolina has seceded.--[Cheers.] Now, then, is the time to go. [Renewed cheers] A Voice — That dispatch is not reliable.--[Voices--"It is."]lutions or none."] A Student — I tell you what, I'm a North Carolinian, and I'm not going to secede just because South Carolina secedes. [Hisses and cheers] I owe South Carolina no allegiance. Another student objected to the resolutions FoSouth Carolina no allegiance. Another student objected to the resolutions For himself, he would stay, in spite of the resolutions. Another Student — Oh, that fellow's a Marylander. Student — Yes, I am a Marylander. I belong to a border State that has lost more slaves by the abolitionists than all the other Stat
F. G. Drake (search for this): article 5
e of the students. An exciting debate took place, from a report of which in the Herald we extract the following: Captain Morgan, of Tennessee, arose in an excited manner to address the meeting. He was in favor of the students returning at once to their homes. The contingency alluded to by Dr. Sims had arisen. South Carolina had seceded. [Loud cheers.] He would read a telegraphic dispatch which had just been received. The dispatch was as follows: Richmond, Nov. 9, 1860. F. G. Drake--Southern students — welcome Richmond. South Carolina has seceded.--[Cheers.] Now, then, is the time to go. [Renewed cheers] A Voice — That dispatch is not reliable.--[Voices--"It is."] When are these resolutions to be carried into effect? Are the students ready before reliable information has reached them? Are they ready to surrender all these opportunities? They were Southern men — they were conservative men. [Hisses.] He was not blind to his devotion to the Union, bu<
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 5
s of "Sit down," "Make that fellow shut up."] Let us remain here till we get our diplomas, and then we can return to our native States, and if need be, we can act the part of defenders of our homes, as well as render assistance to those who fall wounded. A Voice--"Get out." Dr. Sims moved as an amendment to the first and second resolutions: Resolved, That we consider it our bounden duty to return to our homes as soon as any of the Southern States secede. Several students here interrupted the proceedings by shouting out at once that they wouldn't have the amendment. One called out, "Let's all go home to our States and tell them to secede." Cheers, and cries of "That's right! Let's all go home." Great confusion prevailed, in the midst of which it was declared that the amendment was carried. The Chairman announced that the meeting was at an end. Seventeen Southern law students have left the Cambridge law school on account of the election of Lincoln.
C. S. Morgan (search for this): article 5
The Southern students at the North. A meeting of the medical students at New York took place on Friday night. There were about 150 present. A series of resolutions were offered, advocating the return home of the students. An exciting debate took place, from a report of which in the Herald we extract the following: Captain Morgan, of Tennessee, arose in an excited manner to address the meeting. He was in favor of the students returning at once to their homes. The contingency alluded to by Dr. Sims had arisen. South Carolina had seceded. [Loud cheers.] He would read a telegraphic dispatch which had just been received. The dispatch was as follows: Richmond, Nov. 9, 1860. F. G. Drake--Southern students — welcome Richmond. South Carolina has seceded.--[Cheers.] Now, then, is the time to go. [Renewed cheers] A Voice — That dispatch is not reliable.--[Voices--"It is."] When are these resolutions to be carried into effect? Are the students ready befo
f Tennessee, arose in an excited manner to address the meeting. He was in favor of the students returning at once to their homes. The contingency alluded to by Dr. Sims had arisen. South Carolina had seceded. [Loud cheers.] He would read a telegraphic dispatch which had just been received. The dispatch was as follows: Riote was called upon each resolution. A voice from the rear part of the meeting called out — Who constituted the committee that drew up the resolutions? Dr. Sims suggested that the resolutions should be amended by introducing the words, "that the students should go home as each State seceded." This was received with tive States, and if need be, we can act the part of defenders of our homes, as well as render assistance to those who fall wounded. A Voice--"Get out." Dr. Sims moved as an amendment to the first and second resolutions: Resolved, That we consider it our bounden duty to return to our homes as soon as any of the South
e question was again put as to the time the students should go home, as fixed, by the resolution. The resolutions were then again read. A vote was called upon each resolution. A voice from the rear part of the meeting called out — Who constituted the committee that drew up the resolutions? Dr. Sims suggested that the resolutions should be amended by introducing the words, "that the students should go home as each State seceded." This was received with cheers. Mr. Clinton again came forward. He was not a New York Southerner, and he would tell them that if they shirked the resolutions as they stood, they had better beg the reporters, for God's sake, not to say a word about their having held such a meeting at all.--[Cheers and voices, "The whole resolutions or none."] A Student — I tell you what, I'm a North Carolinian, and I'm not going to secede just because South Carolina secedes. [Hisses and cheers] I owe South Carolina no allegiance. Another
November 9th, 1860 AD (search for this): article 5
ng the return home of the students. An exciting debate took place, from a report of which in the Herald we extract the following: Captain Morgan, of Tennessee, arose in an excited manner to address the meeting. He was in favor of the students returning at once to their homes. The contingency alluded to by Dr. Sims had arisen. South Carolina had seceded. [Loud cheers.] He would read a telegraphic dispatch which had just been received. The dispatch was as follows: Richmond, Nov. 9, 1860. F. G. Drake--Southern students — welcome Richmond. South Carolina has seceded.--[Cheers.] Now, then, is the time to go. [Renewed cheers] A Voice — That dispatch is not reliable.--[Voices--"It is."] When are these resolutions to be carried into effect? Are the students ready before reliable information has reached them? Are they ready to surrender all these opportunities? They were Southern men — they were conservative men. [Hisses.] He was not blind to his devotion<