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Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
is the observed of all observers. As soon as he had cast his vote in Virginia for President, Mr. Ruffin came on here. He has the privilege of the floor in both Houses, and appears to be incessant in his labors for secession. What is most remarkable, the people of South Carolina do not desire to have the National Capital of the new Confederacy within her borders. They say that the possession of and scramble for office will only tend to contaminate her people. The knowing ones name Atlanta, Ga., as the place at which the first Southern Congress will assemble. That such a body will meet ere long there seems to be no doubt here. No people could be more determined than those of South Carolina. Times look gloomy, indeed. The agents for Northern houses are not selling enough to pay their hotel bills, and many have already left the South for their homes. Mr. Yancey on secession. Mr. Yancey spoke at Montgomery, Alabama, on Saturday last. He began by establishing the right o
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
d wrongs to redress, than now. The New York correspondent of the Philadelphia Ledger writing, Friday, says: The money kings had a relapse to-day. The gleam of sunshine, yesterday, is all clouded over again by the scary reports from Milledgeville, announcing that the Georgia Legislature have resolved, or are going to resolve, to back up South Carolina, at the same time placing a million of dollars at the service of the State for warlike purposes. People who have debts due them in Georgia, moreover, feel very uncomfortable in view of the prospects of the passage of a bill suspending the collection of debts until January, 1861. Under these circumstances, of course, "money" continues as tight as a drum, and stocks continue to run down hill, like water. I have it on good authority, that several of the most eminent clergymen of the city have been waited upon by various citizens, within the day or two past, to urge them to preach discourses on Sunday next suitable to t
Sumterville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
bon on the coat lapel. The Palmetto tree, the lone star and the coiled rattlesnake, appear in gold upon the face of the badge. A train of about twenty drays loaded with cotton, started from the South Carolina Railroad Depot early Thursday morning, on the way to the wharf, the head of each animal decked with a Palmetto flag, and the owner of the drays leading the van. It had quite a novel appearance, and attracted much attention. The Press. "There is no retreat," says the Sumpter (S. C.) Dispatch, "but in submission, and submission new is ruin and dishonor. While we write this article the Colonial flag, with its crescent and lone star, is floating gaily at our office door, and the sentiments and resolves which that flag indicates, lie deep within our bosom, and pant for utterance and action.--Oh, shades of McDuffie, and Hamilton, and Hayne, and Calhoun! Oh, shades of the mighty! this is the day ye long desired to see — the day of deliverance and of jubilee!" The
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
only tend to contaminate her people. The knowing ones name Atlanta, Ga., as the place at which the first Southern Congress will assemble. That such a body will meet ere long there seems to be no doubt here. No people could be more determined than those of South Carolina. Times look gloomy, indeed. The agents for Northern houses are not selling enough to pay their hotel bills, and many have already left the South for their homes. Mr. Yancey on secession. Mr. Yancey spoke at Montgomery, Alabama, on Saturday last. He began by establishing the right of a "sovereign" State to withdraw from the Union when the terms of the contract were broken, arguing that all those States which had made laws obstructing the action of the Fugitive Slave law had already nullified the bond of union. He advised a convention of all the Gulf States, to the end that after a separate State withdrawal, a new Union might be formed, and a Southern Republic. He stated that the border States would not im
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
late Legislature were welcomed home. The town was in a blaze of light and enthusiasm. Mayor Macbeth, who presided, in alluding to the work of the body of which the delegates had been members said: They have enrolled in the archives of your Sate a statute that will reflect honor on them while they live and their memories when they are They have solemnly determined that the time has come when the people of South Carolina shall meet in solemn Convention to dissever themselves from the United States.--They have inaugurated a revolution, the future operation of which there is no mind here can grasp, or tell the suffering and the trials that have to be passed through. I thank God, my fellow-citizens, and I express the conviction of my mind, when I say that there will be suffering, but I believe the most of that suffering will be beyond our borders. I solemnly believe that among you there will be the least of the sufferings that may happen in the civilized world. And there is this c
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
that the time has come when the people of South Carolina shall meet in solemn Convention to dissevehe honor and safety of the Commonwealth of South Carolina. Senators and Representatives, your calone, it is my fixed belief that the State of South Carolina, whatever may betide her, whoever refuse to stand by her — that South Carolina, solitary and alone if need be, will launch her gallant liall concurred in the necessity for placing South Carolina in an attitude of resistance to Northern ammand to assist in fighting the battles of South Carolina. As the State does not at present hap What is most remarkable, the people of South Carolina do not desire to have the National Capitals a large brilliant star, which represents South Carolina. Underneath the tree is the following apo resist Black Republican rule in or out of South Carolina. The motto is, "Blood and Steel"--a reliaolved, or are going to resolve, to back up South Carolina, at the same time placing a million of dol
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
er identified with isolated State action. Separate action was now the best, if not the only, mean of securing cooperation; and on the Convention would devolve the duty of putting our State out of the Union without delay, whether alone or not. My devotion to the Union is, as I have said, a thing of the past — and I here pledge myself, for weal or for woe, in life or in death, to stand by the State of my birth.--[Applause.] Gov. Gist--the Capital of the New Confederacy. A Columbia (S. C.) correspondent thus writes the New York Times: His Excellency, Gov. Gist, accompanied by his wife and daughter, paid a visit of inspection to the new State capitol, now in course of erection, this morning, (Nov. 12th,) and I am told was highly pleased with all he saw.--After the inspection, I had the honor of an introduction to the Governor, and I must say I found him a most affable and amiable gentleman. He says that offers of volunteers are coming in from all quarters of the Sout
e owner of the drays leading the van. It had quite a novel appearance, and attracted much attention. The Press. "There is no retreat," says the Sumpter (S. C.) Dispatch, "but in submission, and submission new is ruin and dishonor. While we write this article the Colonial flag, with its crescent and lone star, is floating gaily at our office door, and the sentiments and resolves which that flag indicates, lie deep within our bosom, and pant for utterance and action.--Oh, shades of McDuffie, and Hamilton, and Hayne, and Calhoun! Oh, shades of the mighty! this is the day ye long desired to see — the day of deliverance and of jubilee!" The New York Tribune professes to be willing to let the South go out of the Union. It says: Still we say, in all earnestness and good faith, whenever a whole section of this Republic — whether a half, a third or only a fourth--shall truly desire and demand a separation from the residue, we shall as earnestly favor such separation. I
Carolinian (search for this): article 1
rials and perils of the country as well as they — that they should believe that such a people could have submitted with acquiescence, and without resistance to their unholy demands. One word in conclusion. You are in a revolution. We are all embarked in one bottom. Our persons, our property, our families, our institutions, our civilization, and all that men hold dear and precious in life are concerned. Have faith in each other have charity for each other. The heart of every Carolinian is true to his State. Let there be but one party, and let that be the party of the State against the common foe. Look at the developments! How proud and glorious was the unanimity of the whole representation in the Legislature of South Carolina Why, it was a thing almost unparalleled in the annals of legislation. It is my firm belief that, when that Convention assembles, that the vote to take this State out of the Federal Union will be equally unanimous. Already do we see, by the
Richmond Yeadon (search for this): article 1
s this done? For the common good, for the common welfare. Not that the banks might make profit, but that they might have the opportunity of exhibiting their patriotism, in taking part in the common movement to sustain the mercantile community. I believe they will come up to it. I believe they will come up to the wants of the community, and do as the community has done by them. Let each man be firm and true, and our second independence will not be less glorious than the first. Hon. Richmond Yeadon, for many years, and now editor of the Charleston Courier, one of the most conservative papers in the South, said: Whatever difference may have existed between us, we all concurred in the necessity for placing South Carolina in an attitude of resistance to Northern aggression. The result has been an auspicious unanimity, unparalleled in the history of legislation. He said that hither to he had been among those who were in favor of maintaining the Constitutional Union. He now
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