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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
e country, to restore matters to the condition they occupied prior to 1854, by re-establishing the Missouri Compromise line, don't you think, my good friend, you could then be persuaded to agree that all the Southern States, except South Carolina, would agree, even without the restoration of the Missouri line, to remain a little longer in the Union? although South Carolina might have assumed that she was too good, and high toned, and chivalric to remain where Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Maryland, North Carolina and Missouri would be proud to stay? And if South Carolina should be deaf to all remonstrance, and insist that she would stay out, after that, don't you think she ought to be left to share the fate she had so unnecessarily courted and provoked? All this I have strong hope may be accomplished, if reasonable time is allowed, a suitable spirit is adopted, and a proper course is pursued; but I do not think it can be done by the system of bullying and bravado that many of
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 1
ude. [Laughter.] Their assaults have been unceasing, but all for our good. They have organized themselves into a great geographical party. By so doing, they have furnished us with a justification for dissolving our connection with them. If, tomorrow morning, they repealed every antislavery law, and said they would never whisper the word "negro" again, he would still cut loose his connection with them. [Applause.] The climate, the soil, and the habits of the people rendered it unsafe for Maine and Texas to be under the same Government. The idea of our fathers that representation was the bulwark of protection for the Union, had proved a fallacy, if ninety Southern men, were they all Calhoun in intellect, would not weigh against one hundred and forty of the Love joys and the Hickmans. Our ancestors made a sad blunder when they went into partnership with the Pilgrim Fathers, who came across the ocean in search of toleration, but became the most relentless persecutors in the world.-
Staunton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
as soon as the ordinance could be drawn, he would vote to secede, and stay in secession, till doomsday. [Loud applause.] Hon. W. D. DeSaussure also announced the gratification it would give him to vote for the ordinance declaring South Carolina out of the Union. Messrs. Hopkins and Kinsler were not present, but patriotic speeches were made by Hon. Wade Hampton and Col. Thomas Y. Simons, which created great enthusiasm. Hon. John M. Botts has written a letter to a gentleman in Staunton, Va., which is published in the Alexandria Gazette. He opposes a State Convention. Of South Carolina he says: South Carolina, spurning the counsels and co-operation of Virginia and other Southern States, has, of her own accord, and upon her own hook chosen to raise a mighty and a fearful issue with the General Government, and upon the General Government rests the responsibility of settling the question. Hands off and fair play to both, say I. In its present stage we have nothing to
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
South Carolina on Friday last. Out of the twenty-two members elected from Charleston, seventeen of them have given the following pledge: "1. That the Convention when assembled should withdraw South Carolina from the Confederacy of the United States, as soon as the ordinance of secession can be framed and adopted. "2. That after South Carolina withdraws from the Confederacy of the United States she should never be re-united with any of the non-slave holding States of this Union in United States she should never be re-united with any of the non-slave holding States of this Union in any form of government whatever." Fourteen of the gentlemen elected, says the Charleston Mercury, are of the old Secession party, and seven of the old Co-operation party — although it must be said no issue was made in the election between these old parties. Gov. Gist has sent in the following message to the South Carolina Legislature: Allow me, in this, my last communication, a parting word. South Carolina, after many long years of earnest but fruitless efforts to arrest the p
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
he infection, and join in the general song;--it has become something like the 'harp of a thousand strings.' I only refer to this fact as another evidence of the feeling pervading all classes and conditions of society here." The Governor of Georgia Censured. The Georgia House of Representatives have unanimously passed a vote of censure upon the Governor of that State, Hon. Joseph E. Brown. It appears that the Governor in vetoing the Bank Relief bill intimated that it had been passed th: Be it Resolved, That His Excellency Governor Brown, has not only abused the privileges of this House, but has failed to maintain, in his official intercourse with this body, that dignity of deportment which becomes the Chief Magistrate of Georgia. Resolved, further, That this resolution be spread upon the Journals of this House. The Committee of Thirty-three. The Committee of Thirty-three will not be called together by Mr. Corwin before Tuesday next. His reason for this del
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
occupied prior to 1854, by re-establishing the Missouri Compromise line, don't you think, my good friend, you could then be persuaded to agree that all the Southern States, except South Carolina, would agree, even without the restoration of the Missouri line, to remain a little longer in the Union? although South Carolina might have assumed that she was too good, and high toned, and chivalric to remain where Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Maryland, North Carolina and Missouri would be proud toMissouri would be proud to stay? And if South Carolina should be deaf to all remonstrance, and insist that she would stay out, after that, don't you think she ought to be left to share the fate she had so unnecessarily courted and provoked? All this I have strong hope may be accomplished, if reasonable time is allowed, a suitable spirit is adopted, and a proper course is pursued; but I do not think it can be done by the system of bullying and bravado that many of our leading men seem to have a decided passion for.
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
ll serve on the Committee. The efforts on the part of the secessionists to get Mr. Houston, of Alabama, to decline serving, have been unsuccessful. He declares that he will fight the battles of their part to abandon the Union without an effort to save it Another offer to the Governor of Alabama. Governor Moore, of Alabama, has received the following patriotic tender of services: To His Alabama, has received the following patriotic tender of services: To His Excellency, the Governor of the State of Alabama-- Sir: The undersigned, a veteran of four wars, the Indian war of 1798, the war of 1812, the Tus-ke-se-ha war, and the Indian war of 1836; also,State of Alabama-- Sir: The undersigned, a veteran of four wars, the Indian war of 1798, the war of 1812, the Tus-ke-se-ha war, and the Indian war of 1836; also, and by no means least, Captain of the squad of Honorary Members of the Montgomery True Blues, and Commander-in-Chief of the well known, patriotic, and reliable "Old Fogy Club," begs leave to offer to your Excellency, in behalf of the State of Alabama, the services of the said last mentioned body of true and faithful citizens; begging, at the same, to remark, that he would also offer the services
France (France) (search for this): article 1
d here, a stranger would think he had landed in a French province. One of our old-fashioned national airs is never heard, but from every quarter — from the pianos in hotel parlors, from private residences, from bands on parade, and from every conceivable instrument, comes the everlasting 'Marseillaise;' if you happen to pass a residence and a lady is singing in the parlor, it is the 'Marseillaise,' the only alteration in the words being in the first line, where 'Carolina' is substituted for France; the small boys in the streets whistle the 'Marseillaise,' and that only, and, indeed, children of rather an older growth have caught the infection, and join in the general song;--it has become something like the 'harp of a thousand strings.' I only refer to this fact as another evidence of the feeling pervading all classes and conditions of society here." The Governor of Georgia Censured. The Georgia House of Representatives have unanimously passed a vote of censure upon the Govern
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
y, and from a masked battery to discharge their missiles. But I trust they will strike the armor of truth and fall harmless at our feet, and that by the 28th of December no flag but the Palmetto will float over any part of South Carolina. It only remains for me to request the appointment of a Committee to examine the accounts of the Executive Department, and to inform you that I have no further communication to make. Wm. H. Gist. Ex. Gov. Adams, of S. C., was serenaded in Columbia, S. C., on Friday night. In reply to it he made a speech, which is thus reported: He said that he prized the honor just conferred upon him more highly than all the honors heretofore heaped upon him by his constituents. Lowndes, who opposed the Union, in his dying moments said he wanted no other epitaph than, "Here lies the man who opposed the Union, because it was fatal to his country." He (the speaker,) wanted no prouder inscription than, "Here lies one who signed the Ordinance of Seces
New England (United States) (search for this): article 1
rge of the army. Their courage, like Bob Acre's, oozed out at their fingers' ends. [Laughter.] In 1812, when the South had undertaken to protect Yankee seamen, they burned blue lights on their coast — and in the Mexican war they furnished precious little blood.--He would not go into the history of the tariff, and show how it swindled the South; but the pension system was adopted thirty or forty years after the Revolution, when it was supposed that most of the old soldiers were dead, and New England immediately turned out more soldier-claimants than were enrolled in the whole Revolutionary Army. [Laughter.] They are very smart, and can demonstrate that the higher the tax the cheaper the article.--Next they will attempt to demonstrate that the lower the price of cotton the better for us, because it will teach us economy, which is one of the cardinal virtues. [Laughter.] He was not going to discuss secession, for everybody was for it, from Dan to Beersheba, and in a few days it will
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