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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1860., [Electronic resource].

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N. C. Smith (search for this): article 1
itories, District of Columbia, arsenals and dockyards; that it shall be the duty of Congress efficiently and adequately to protect it by legislation where it exists; that no Territorial government has power to legislate with the subject; that the right of master over a slave, while temporarily sojourning or intransitive through a non-slaveholding State, shall be guaranteed and protected; that fugitive slaves shall be delivered up or be paid for by the States in which they are rescued. Mr. Smith, of Virginia, offered a resolution instructing the Committee to inquire as to the policy of declaring out of the Federal Union any member thereof which may aim to nullify an act of Congress. Mr. Jenkins offered a resolution instructing the Committee to inquire as to the expediency of amending the Fugitive Slave Law, with a view to a prompt rendition of fugitive slaves, and a proper compensation to the owners of those not returned. Also, the propriety of providing, by a Constitutional
al and common obligations render it obligatory on the Federal Government to enforce, in good faith, the laws enacted pursuant to its authority; and instructing the Committee to inquire whether any action is necessary (in view of the present condition of public affairs) against an attempt by any State to nullity the laws necessary for the existence of the Confederacy. Mr. Davis, of Indiana, presented a petition asking Congress to preclude Congress from legislation on slavery, &c. Mr. Niblack offered a resolution providing indemnity for slaves rescued by force or violence; and that the Committee report, by bill or otherwise. Mr. McClelland offered the following: Resolved. That the Committee of Thirty-three be instructed to inquire and report whether Congress has the constitutional power to make the people of any particular State or municipal corporation therein, liable to indemnity the owner of any slave escaping into such State, and who has been rescued from rightf
Edward F. Noel (search for this): article 1
o such State, and who has been rescued from rightful custody by force or otherwise; and also, whether it is expedient to establish a special Federal police for the purpose of executing the laws of the United States and promptly suppressing any unlawful resistance thereto; and also, whether any further legislation is required to secure a prompt, certain and full enforcement of the guarantees of the Constitution; or whether an amendment of the Constitution is necessary for that purpose. Mr. Noel offered resolutions instructing the Committee to take into consideration the propriety and necessity of abolishing, by an amendment to the Constitution, the office of President, and of establishing in lieu thereof an Executive Council, consisting of three members, to be elected by districts composed of contiguous States as near as practicable; each member of said Council to be armed with a veto power such as is now vested in the President; and if such plan be deemed practicable by said Comm
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 1
to-day there is a new set. We will get them all instructed after a while. [Laughter from Senators.] Mr. Wigfall resumed — I say Cotton is King, and that cotton waves his sceptre not only over thirty-three States, but over the Island of Great Britain and over Continental Europe. There is no crowned head, either upon that Island or Continent, that does not bend the knee in fear, and acknowledge allegiance to that power. Five millions of people in Great Britain live upon cotton. You Great Britain live upon cotton. You may make short crops of grain, and they can husband their supply, but exhaust the supply of cotton one week, and all England will starve. They will not burst open barns, but burn whole towns. We can direct the trade of two hundred and fifty millions to our own ports instead of Boston, Philadelphia and New York, if we go out of the Union. Our imports will amount to two hundred and fifty millions, and forty per cent, upon that pours into our treasury one hundred million dollars; twenty per cen
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 1
tion; but if eight non-slave States vote against it, and yet its ratification made it a part of the Constitution, we would say at once here were amendments to the Constitution which were distasteful to eight non-slaveholding States, and which they would probably disregard, as they disregard the present Constitution. Suppose that amendments were proposed, and fifteen slave States ratify them; suppose, also, that the non-slaveholding States ratify them, but that New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and other border States, refuse ratification, why, what practical use would they be to use? None. What is the use of discussing what we would be satisfied with, when nothing has been offered us?--What is the use, when we do not believe we will be permitted to retain the Senators we now have? The Republicans deny that under the Constitution slaves are recognized as property. If we could believe they would go to their constituents and urge the ratification of proper ame
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
ly disregard, as they disregard the present Constitution. Suppose that amendments were proposed, and fifteen slave States ratify them; suppose, also, that the non-slaveholding States ratify them, but that New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and other border States, refuse ratification, why, what practical use would they be to use? None. What is the use of discussing what we would be satisfied with, when nothing has been offered us?--What is the use, when we do not believe w and instructing the Committee to inquire whether any action is necessary (in view of the present condition of public affairs) against an attempt by any State to nullity the laws necessary for the existence of the Confederacy. Mr. Davis, of Indiana, presented a petition asking Congress to preclude Congress from legislation on slavery, &c. Mr. Niblack offered a resolution providing indemnity for slaves rescued by force or violence; and that the Committee report, by bill or otherwise.
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): article 1
t non-slave States vote against it, and yet its ratification made it a part of the Constitution, we would say at once here were amendments to the Constitution which were distasteful to eight non-slaveholding States, and which they would probably disregard, as they disregard the present Constitution. Suppose that amendments were proposed, and fifteen slave States ratify them; suppose, also, that the non-slaveholding States ratify them, but that New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and other border States, refuse ratification, why, what practical use would they be to use? None. What is the use of discussing what we would be satisfied with, when nothing has been offered us?--What is the use, when we do not believe we will be permitted to retain the Senators we now have? The Republicans deny that under the Constitution slaves are recognized as property. If we could believe they would go to their constituents and urge the ratification of proper amendments, we belie
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
and meet in Convention and adopt a Federal Government, and establish a foreign department, I shall advocate the adoption of that same Constitution that was ratified by the old thirteen States. I have no doubt that when Virginia, Tennessee, Maryland, Kentucky and other border States see what we have done, they will come into the Union, and not many months will elapse before this beautiful fabric will again be the scene of our discussions, and in which we will not only consider these matterse State Personal Liberty bills are in conflict with the Constitution, and further, to inquire whether the Fugitive Slave Law is susceptible of amendment so as to ascertain more certainly the actual condition of the fugitive. Mr. Stewart, of Maryland, offered a preamble setting forth the principles on which the government is founded. That when it threatens to become destructive to the great objects which it was intended to accomplish, every State should be placed in a condition to provide f
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
lished and abolition presses be suppressed, that abolition speeches shall no longer be made, and that we shall not have pirates and murderers sent among our women and children, when such an honest effort is made to meet the demands of the South, there is a prospect of giving them a fair consideration. [Roars of laughter from the galleries and the Republican Senators.] He continued, saying — Senators may laugh in our faces. [Renewed laughter from the whole house.] My friends from Kentucky, Missouri, and other Union-saving friends may look and see derision depicted in their countenances when I make this proposition. [Laughter.] I trust they will understand. The Latin maxim says, "Learn, even from your enemies, some wisdom." I have told the people whom I represent, long, long ago, that they will not be permitted to keep that which they have now; that they are regarded as poltroons, and that you talk of coercion, and of binding this glorious Union, as you call it, with cords of hem
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): article 1
dments to the Constitution, to the end that the people may thus be enabled to confer together, in the manner provided in the establishment of the government, and adopt such measures as, in their wisdom, may be proper to promote the common welfare of the States. The above propositions were severally read and referred to the Union Committee. Mr. Bonham said he had received a notice to attend a meeting of the Committee on Military Affairs on Friday. As he did not expect to remain much longer a member of Congress, he felt it due to resign his position as a member thereof, in order that the vacancy may at once be filled. He did not adopt this course owing to any dissatisfaction with the Committee; he should always cherish a lively recollection of their uniform and courteous kindness toward him. He was excused. The House passed the bill making further provision in relation to incorporated Land Offices, and a bill extending the time for Oregon to select certain lands.
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