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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1860., [Electronic resource].

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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
and which they would probably disregard, as they disregard the present Constitution. Suppose that amendments were proposed, and fifteen slave States ratify them; suppose, also, that the non-slaveholding States ratify them, but that New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and other border States, refuse ratification, why, what practical use would they be to use? None. What is the use of discussing what we would be satisfied with, when nothing has been offered us?--What is the usand ought to be respected and obeyed, and no obstacle thrown in the way of their execution. That the Constitution is the result of conciliation and compromise, and can only be preserved by the exercise of a similar spirit. Mr. Morris, of Pennsylvania, offered a resolution instructing, the Union Committee to inquire and report as to whether the State Personal Liberty bills are in conflict with the Constitution, and further, to inquire whether the Fugitive Slave Law is susceptible of amendme
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
me Constitution that was ratified by the old thirteen States. I have no doubt that when Virginia, Tennessee, Maryland, Kentucky and other border States see what we have done, they will come into the Union, and not many months will elapse before this beautiful fabric will again be the scene of our discussions, and in which we will not only consider these matters pertaining to our domestic affairs, but foreign relations. Mr. W. here read extracts from the Constitution and laws of South Carolina previous to the inauguration of the first President of the United States. The immediate cause of secession is the election of a Black Republican President. The people of the North must know that the present state of affairs has been brought about by means of the Helper book, and the teachings of the Senator from New York, the preaching of the followers, or rather the pretended followers of Christ, and the teaching in your schools of your children to hate our institutions. The Sena
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
r, to coerce another. Do you suppose we are to be amused with the clap-trap of Fourth-of-July orations? As a nation inheriting rights we have passed that point. When these eight cotton States withdraw from the Union, as they will in the next two months, and meet in Convention and adopt a Federal Government, and establish a foreign department, I shall advocate the adoption of that same Constitution that was ratified by the old thirteen States. I have no doubt that when Virginia, Tennessee, Maryland, Kentucky and other border States see what we have done, they will come into the Union, and not many months will elapse before this beautiful fabric will again be the scene of our discussions, and in which we will not only consider these matters pertaining to our domestic affairs, but foreign relations. Mr. W. here read extracts from the Constitution and laws of South Carolina previous to the inauguration of the first President of the United States. The immediate cause of s
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
lina previous to the inauguration of the first President of the United States. The immediate cause of secession is the election of a Black Rrther controversies in regard to the several Territories of the United States, said Committee divide said Territories into States of convenie put down armed rebellion against the laws and authority of the United States, to protect the property thereof against unlawful seizure, and n, or attempting to rescue the fugitive while in custody of the United States officers. Mr. English offered a resolution that the territory of the United States should be equally divided between the slave and non-slaveholding States; slavery to be recognized in the one and praw or impairing the constitutional rights of any citizen of the United States. Mr. Holman offered a resolution declaring that the right ial Federal police for the purpose of executing the laws of the United States and promptly suppressing any unlawful resistance thereto; and a
e-elected. Mr. Martin was appointed a committee to inform the President of his re-election. Mr. Harvie returned thanks for the re-election, and paid a high compliment to the Directory and officers of the Company. Mr. R. R. Howison, from the Committee on Wharves, etc., presented a report, which included resolutions, approving the establishment of wharves at Rocketts: and referring the subject of pre-payment of freights to the Directory. On motion, the Examining Committee of 1859 was continued, and the By-Laws referred to them for revisal. Mr. B. M. Jones offered the following resolution: Resolved, That in lieu of the aid heretofore promised to the Roanoke Valley Railroad Company, the President and Directors of this Company are advised and instructed to grant to the said R. V. R. R. Company, so soon as in their opinion the financial condition of this Company will admit of it, the acceptances of the Company for $5,000 per month, payable ninety days or six m
the country and of the Company will justify their action, upon the important questions now pending before us. After an interchange of opinions with stockholders, the substitute was accepted for the committee's resolution. On motion of Col. Wiley, the resolution and substitute were laid on the table. On motion, the stockholders proceeded to the election of officers, and Lewis E. Harvie, Esq., was unanimously re-elected. On motion of Mr. N. B. Hill, the present Directors, Messr Keysville towards Clarksville. Mr. Ruffin moved to lay the resolution on the table. Mr. Anderson opposed the motion, and advocated the adoption of the resolution. The resolution was further advocated by Messrs. Stovall, Chalmers, Wiley, Scott and Bouldin; and opposed by Mr. F. G. Ruffin, who called a scale vote on the question. Several gentlemen, favorable to the connection, were instructed to vote against all appropriations at this time, because of the unsettled condition
Carolina Coal field Railroad, and said Western Extension: Provided the financial condition of the Company will justify it. The resolution was explained by Mr. Martin, of Henry, at the request of Col. Townes. After some discussion, in which Messrs, Townes, Kean, Harvie and Martin participated, Mr. A. D. Dickinson ofMartin participated, Mr. A. D. Dickinson offered the following, as a substitute for the committee's resolution: Resolved, That after the election of officers and the transaction of the ordinary business, the meeting of stockholders be adjourned over to such time as shall be designated for their re-assembling by Directors, or by the requisite number of stockholders, whq., was unanimously re-elected. On motion of Mr. N. B. Hill, the present Directors, Messrs. R. O. Haskins and Wm. Palmer, were unanimously re-elected. Mr. Martin was appointed a committee to inform the President of his re-election. Mr. Harvie returned thanks for the re-election, and paid a high compliment to the Dir
unt to the sum of $60,000; Provided, that the said R. V. R. R. Company shall deposit, as security for such acceptances, their eight per cent. bonds for a like amount, and that the sum thus loaned shall be expended in laving and grading track continuously from Keysville towards Clarksville. Mr. Ruffin moved to lay the resolution on the table. Mr. Anderson opposed the motion, and advocated the adoption of the resolution. The resolution was further advocated by Messrs. Stovall, Chalmers, Wiley, Scott and Bouldin; and opposed by Mr. F. G. Ruffin, who called a scale vote on the question. Several gentlemen, favorable to the connection, were instructed to vote against all appropriations at this time, because of the unsettled condition of the country, but declared their willingness to aid the scheme at the proper time. When the vote was counted, the State having voted against the resolution, the question was carried in the negative. The meeting then adjourned.
Lewis E. Harvie (search for this): article 1
l justify it. The resolution was explained by Mr. Martin, of Henry, at the request of Col. Townes. After some discussion, in which Messrs, Townes, Kean, Harvie and Martin participated, Mr. A. D. Dickinson offered the following, as a substitute for the committee's resolution: Resolved, That after the election of On motion of Col. Wiley, the resolution and substitute were laid on the table. On motion, the stockholders proceeded to the election of officers, and Lewis E. Harvie, Esq., was unanimously re-elected. On motion of Mr. N. B. Hill, the present Directors, Messrs. R. O. Haskins and Wm. Palmer, were unanimously re-elected. Mr. Martin was appointed a committee to inform the President of his re-election. Mr. Harvie returned thanks for the re-election, and paid a high compliment to the Directory and officers of the Company. Mr. R. R. Howison, from the Committee on Wharves, etc., presented a report, which included resolutions, approving
es shall amount to the sum of $60,000; Provided, that the said R. V. R. R. Company shall deposit, as security for such acceptances, their eight per cent. bonds for a like amount, and that the sum thus loaned shall be expended in laving and grading track continuously from Keysville towards Clarksville. Mr. Ruffin moved to lay the resolution on the table. Mr. Anderson opposed the motion, and advocated the adoption of the resolution. The resolution was further advocated by Messrs. Stovall, Chalmers, Wiley, Scott and Bouldin; and opposed by Mr. F. G. Ruffin, who called a scale vote on the question. Several gentlemen, favorable to the connection, were instructed to vote against all appropriations at this time, because of the unsettled condition of the country, but declared their willingness to aid the scheme at the proper time. When the vote was counted, the State having voted against the resolution, the question was carried in the negative. The meeting then
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