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veholding or non-slaveholding, agricultural, commercial or manufacturing, can live under one Constitution, as when the old thirteen States ratified and made it binding between them. By the late election it would seem as if the North thought themselves responsible for the domestic institutions of all the States. One State has not a right to call out the army and navy, or negotiate with a foreign power, to coerce another. Do you suppose we are to be amused with the clap-trap of Fourth-of-July orations? As a nation inheriting rights we have passed that point. When these eight cotton States withdraw from the Union, as they will in the next two months, and meet in Convention and adopt a Federal Government, and establish a foreign department, I shall advocate the adoption of that same Constitution that was ratified by the old thirteen States. I have no doubt that when Virginia, Tennessee, Maryland, Kentucky and other border States see what we have done, they will come into the
John Brown (search for this): article 1
ed as poltroons, and that you talk of coercion, and of binding this glorious Union, as you call it, with cords of hemp. Yet you petition that his glorious Union shall continue. Stop with in your borders those flaming presses and public speakers who excite the people against us I say to those States that you shall not-- that's the word I choose to use, and I represent the feeling and determination of the people I represent — I say you shall not permit men to excite your citizens by making John Brown speeches and bringing strychnine within the limits of the State I represent. You shall not publish newspapers and pamphlets to excite our slaves to insurrection. You shall not publish newspapers and pamphlets to excite our slaveholders against the slave, or slaveholder against non-slaveholder. We will have peace, and if you do not offer it to us, we will quietly have our rights under the constitutional compact or withdraw from the Union and establish a government for ourselves. If
to legislate with the subject; that the right of master over a slave, while temporarily sojourning or intransitive through a non-slaveholding State, shall be guaranteed and protected; that fugitive slaves shall be delivered up or be paid for by the States in which they are rescued. Mr. Smith, of Virginia, offered a resolution instructing the Committee to inquire as to the policy of declaring out of the Federal Union any member thereof which may aim to nullify an act of Congress. Mr. Jenkins offered a resolution instructing the Committee to inquire as to the expediency of amending the Fugitive Slave Law, with a view to a prompt rendition of fugitive slaves, and a proper compensation to the owners of those not returned. Also, the propriety of providing, by a Constitutional amendment or a Congressional enactment, for the protection of the rights of slaveholders in the common Territories, &c. Mr. Cox submitted the following: Whereas. One of the chief and just complain
Senator of Texas--Conduct of the Republicans — resolutions offered in the House for amending the Constitution. The debate in Congress Wednesday is interesting. In the Senate, Mr. Wigfall, of Texas, made a warm speech, in which he said: If the people of the North desire it, this Union can be saved; but this Union is not to be saved by flattery, either on the floor of the Senate or from the stump. You cannot save the Union by singing hosannas. You cannot save it by making Fourth of July speeches.--You have got to come down to the work and do something practically. The people of the different slaveholding States, especially the Cotton States, are dissatisfied with the present government as about to be administered by the incoming Administration. There is nothing that can satisfy them except by amending the Constitution, and these amendments must be made by the Northern States unanimously, or they will not be satisfied, and I say here they ought not to be. It amend
ut foreign relations. Mr. W. here read extracts from the Constitution and laws of South Carolina previous to the inauguration of the first President of the United States. The immediate cause of secession is the election of a Black Republican President. The people of the North must know that the present state of affairs has been brought about by means of the Helper book, and the teachings of the Senator from New York, the preaching of the followers, or rather the pretended followers of Christ, and the teaching in your schools of your children to hate our institutions. The Senator from New York told his Wide-Awake prætorians that their services could not be dispensed with after the election. They would be needed to secure the fruits of the victory. A half million men in uniform are being drilled for the purpose of organization to sweep the country in which I live with fire and sword. Mr. Seward here arose and said — I want to know the ground and place where that took
State or the people thereof have failed to obey and enforce the obligations imposed by the Constitution; and if so, the reason thereof, and whether any legislation is required to secure such enforcement. Resolved, That to avoid all further controversies in regard to the several Territories of the United States, said Committee divide said Territories into States of convenient size, with a view to their prompt admission into the Union on an equal footing with the original States. Mr. Bingham offered a resolution that the Select Committee of Thirty-three report to this House such additional legislation as they may deem necessary to suppress and put down armed rebellion against the laws and authority of the United States, to protect the property thereof against unlawful seizure, and the citizens thereof against unlawful violence. Mr. Mallory offered a resolution of instructions for constitutionally establishing a line similar unto the Missouri Compromise, providing for the
ide said Territories into States of convenient size, with a view to their prompt admission into the Union on an equal footing with the original States. Mr. Bingham offered a resolution that the Select Committee of Thirty-three report to this House such additional legislation as they may deem necessary to suppress and put down armed rebellion against the laws and authority of the United States, to protect the property thereof against unlawful seizure, and the citizens thereof against unlawfy districts composed of contiguous States as near as practicable; each member of said Council to be armed with a veto power such as is now vested in the President; and if such plan be deemed practicable by said Committee, that they report to this House such details thereof as may be necessary to accommodate the same to the existing Constitution of the United States. Also, resolved, That said Committee also be requested to take into consideration the means necessary, if any can be devised,
ffer it to us, we will quietly have our rights under the constitutional compact or withdraw from the Union and establish a government for ourselves. If you then persist in aggression, these sovereign States will settle the question, and when you laugh at these impotent efforts, little as you regard them, I tell you emphatically that Cotton is King. [Laughter, and some applause in the galleries.] The President said the Sergeant-at-Arms will clear the galleries if it occurs again. Mr. Hale said--Mr. President, that threat was made one, two or three times yesterday --now is the time to carry it out. Mr. Wigfall said — If the exhibition of feeling in the galleries occur again they should be cleared, and once being cleared we will proceed. I trust the Senate will act upon t-- decency is looked for. Mr. Davis hoped the Senator would be permitted to proceed. I think we attach too much importance to the expression of the galleries. I take it for granted that those warn
to States of convenient size, with a view to their prompt admission into the Union on an equal footing with the original States. Mr. Bingham offered a resolution that the Select Committee of Thirty-three report to this House such additional legislation as they may deem necessary to suppress and put down armed rebellion against the laws and authority of the United States, to protect the property thereof against unlawful seizure, and the citizens thereof against unlawful violence. Mr. Mallory offered a resolution of instructions for constitutionally establishing a line similar unto the Missouri Compromise, providing for the admission of States, and prohibiting the interference of Congress with slavery. Mr. Stevenson offered a resolution that the Committee inquire into the expediency of amending the Fugitive Slave Law by declaring it a felony to resist the Federal officers in its execution, or attempting to rescue the fugitive while in custody of the United States officers
on any member thereof which may aim to nullify an act of Congress. Mr. Jenkins offered a resolution instructing the Committee to inquire as to the expediency of amending the Fugitive Slave Law, with a view to a prompt rendition of fugitive slaves, and a proper compensation to the owners of those not returned. Also, the propriety of providing, by a Constitutional amendment or a Congressional enactment, for the protection of the rights of slaveholders in the common Territories, &c. Mr. Cox submitted the following: Whereas. One of the chief and just complaints on the part of the slaveholding States of this Confederacy is a refusal or neglect and failure of certain Executives of the Northern States to deliver fugitives from justice, indicted for treason, murder, and slave-stealing in said slave States; therefore, Resolved. That the Committee of Thirty three for the establishment of comity between the States, be required to consider what, if any, further legislation is
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