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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 19
Another election by Default. --The Macon (Ga.) Messenger says that the regular city election for Mayer and Aldermen came off Saturday, and may be recorded as the most singular incident that has ever occurred there. Two hundred and twelve votes were polled against 740 last year, and 800 the year previous. It is hardly to be presumed that one-half of the citizens knew of the election, the public mind being so absorbed in more pressing and important events.
Another election by Default. --The Macon (Ga.) Messenger says that the regular city election for Mayer and Aldermen came off Saturday, and may be recorded as the most singular incident that has ever occurred there. Two hundred and twelve votes were polled against 740 last year, and 800 the year previous. It is hardly to be presumed that one-half of the citizens knew of the election, the public mind being so absorbed in more pressing and important events.