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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
ompromise, meets with little favor. The old gentleman is sincere; but, like all other men of his age, he is not up to the wants of the time. Present exigencies demand young, brave, honest men, who are not cumbered with the ideas of a past era. It seems that Lincoln has made advances, indirectly, to Mr. Ro. E. Scott, with the view of securing him as a member of his Cabinet. He will not serve in any Cabinet. So I hear. Mr. Marks, a member of the Louisiana Legislature, arrived last night with the vote of his State. He says that when the Commissioner from Mississippi came before the Legislature, he was received with great honor by both houses, and told that Louisiana, acting in her sovereign capacity, would leave the Union of her own free will at the time she thought fit, and that then she would be most happy to confer with her sister, Mississippi. Mr. M. asserts that the people of Louisiana are ahead even of South Carolina in their determination to leave the Union. Zed.
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 3
ey thoroughly understand the subject, and we have no fears in regard to their verdict." My bounden duty is to place these facts before the citizens of Virginia. Let them draw their own conclusions. Hale's speech, yesterday, commanded little attention. The buffoon of the Senate, his utterances lose all their point in consequence of that fact. He is playing for the Presidency, when the pure abolitionists have superceded the mild abolitionism of Lincoln. Wade's threat to colonize Mexico and Central America with free negroes, shows what we of the South have to expect if we yield to the Republicans. The Republicans are in high glee to-day. They say a compromise is certain. And how will it be passed? Mark well. All the Southern members of the Crisis Committee, with a few Northern men, will vote for the compromise, the Republicans not voting, or voting against it. It was with some such expectation that Pennington constituted the committee so that the mildest and most y
Central America (search for this): article 3
derstand the subject, and we have no fears in regard to their verdict." My bounden duty is to place these facts before the citizens of Virginia. Let them draw their own conclusions. Hale's speech, yesterday, commanded little attention. The buffoon of the Senate, his utterances lose all their point in consequence of that fact. He is playing for the Presidency, when the pure abolitionists have superceded the mild abolitionism of Lincoln. Wade's threat to colonize Mexico and Central America with free negroes, shows what we of the South have to expect if we yield to the Republicans. The Republicans are in high glee to-day. They say a compromise is certain. And how will it be passed? Mark well. All the Southern members of the Crisis Committee, with a few Northern men, will vote for the compromise, the Republicans not voting, or voting against it. It was with some such expectation that Pennington constituted the committee so that the mildest and most yielding Souther
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 3
Mr. Marks, a member of the Louisiana Legislature, arrived last night with the vote of his State. He says that when the Commissioner from Mississippi came before the Legislature, he was received with great honor by both houses, and told that Louisiana, acting in her sovereign capacity, would leave the Union of her own free will at the time she thought fit, and that then she would be most happy to confer with her sister, Mississippi. Mr. M. asserts that the people of Louisiana are ahead even ht with the vote of his State. He says that when the Commissioner from Mississippi came before the Legislature, he was received with great honor by both houses, and told that Louisiana, acting in her sovereign capacity, would leave the Union of her own free will at the time she thought fit, and that then she would be most happy to confer with her sister, Mississippi. Mr. M. asserts that the people of Louisiana are ahead even of South Carolina in their determination to leave the Union. Zed.
nctioned by the people. They thoroughly understand the subject, and we have no fears in regard to their verdict." My bounden duty is to place these facts before the citizens of Virginia. Let them draw their own conclusions. Hale's speech, yesterday, commanded little attention. The buffoon of the Senate, his utterances lose all their point in consequence of that fact. He is playing for the Presidency, when the pure abolitionists have superceded the mild abolitionism of Lincoln. Wade's threat to colonize Mexico and Central America with free negroes, shows what we of the South have to expect if we yield to the Republicans. The Republicans are in high glee to-day. They say a compromise is certain. And how will it be passed? Mark well. All the Southern members of the Crisis Committee, with a few Northern men, will vote for the compromise, the Republicans not voting, or voting against it. It was with some such expectation that Pennington constituted the committee so
Crittenden (search for this): article 3
ise is certain. And how will it be passed? Mark well. All the Southern members of the Crisis Committee, with a few Northern men, will vote for the compromise, the Republicans not voting, or voting against it. It was with some such expectation that Pennington constituted the committee so that the mildest and most yielding Southern men should be opposed to a majority consisting of decided Northern men. Thus the South, in its desire to pacificate, will be made to out its own throat. Mr. Crittenden's plan for restoring the Missouri Compromise, meets with little favor. The old gentleman is sincere; but, like all other men of his age, he is not up to the wants of the time. Present exigencies demand young, brave, honest men, who are not cumbered with the ideas of a past era. It seems that Lincoln has made advances, indirectly, to Mr. Ro. E. Scott, with the view of securing him as a member of his Cabinet. He will not serve in any Cabinet. So I hear. Mr. Marks, a member of
Robert E. Scott (search for this): article 3
o a majority consisting of decided Northern men. Thus the South, in its desire to pacificate, will be made to out its own throat. Mr. Crittenden's plan for restoring the Missouri Compromise, meets with little favor. The old gentleman is sincere; but, like all other men of his age, he is not up to the wants of the time. Present exigencies demand young, brave, honest men, who are not cumbered with the ideas of a past era. It seems that Lincoln has made advances, indirectly, to Mr. Ro. E. Scott, with the view of securing him as a member of his Cabinet. He will not serve in any Cabinet. So I hear. Mr. Marks, a member of the Louisiana Legislature, arrived last night with the vote of his State. He says that when the Commissioner from Mississippi came before the Legislature, he was received with great honor by both houses, and told that Louisiana, acting in her sovereign capacity, would leave the Union of her own free will at the time she thought fit, and that then she wou
iving notice in advance that we shall do all in our power to prevent its success. And we shall not quarrel with any Republican in Congress who may feel disposed to try the experiment, if he will only give notice of his intention manfully to oppose its being sanctioned by the people. They thoroughly understand the subject, and we have no fears in regard to their verdict." My bounden duty is to place these facts before the citizens of Virginia. Let them draw their own conclusions. Hale's speech, yesterday, commanded little attention. The buffoon of the Senate, his utterances lose all their point in consequence of that fact. He is playing for the Presidency, when the pure abolitionists have superceded the mild abolitionism of Lincoln. Wade's threat to colonize Mexico and Central America with free negroes, shows what we of the South have to expect if we yield to the Republicans. The Republicans are in high glee to-day. They say a compromise is certain. And how will
s speech, yesterday, commanded little attention. The buffoon of the Senate, his utterances lose all their point in consequence of that fact. He is playing for the Presidency, when the pure abolitionists have superceded the mild abolitionism of Lincoln. Wade's threat to colonize Mexico and Central America with free negroes, shows what we of the South have to expect if we yield to the Republicans. The Republicans are in high glee to-day. They say a compromise is certain. And how will itth little favor. The old gentleman is sincere; but, like all other men of his age, he is not up to the wants of the time. Present exigencies demand young, brave, honest men, who are not cumbered with the ideas of a past era. It seems that Lincoln has made advances, indirectly, to Mr. Ro. E. Scott, with the view of securing him as a member of his Cabinet. He will not serve in any Cabinet. So I hear. Mr. Marks, a member of the Louisiana Legislature, arrived last night with the vote
Pennington (search for this): article 3
e mild abolitionism of Lincoln. Wade's threat to colonize Mexico and Central America with free negroes, shows what we of the South have to expect if we yield to the Republicans. The Republicans are in high glee to-day. They say a compromise is certain. And how will it be passed? Mark well. All the Southern members of the Crisis Committee, with a few Northern men, will vote for the compromise, the Republicans not voting, or voting against it. It was with some such expectation that Pennington constituted the committee so that the mildest and most yielding Southern men should be opposed to a majority consisting of decided Northern men. Thus the South, in its desire to pacificate, will be made to out its own throat. Mr. Crittenden's plan for restoring the Missouri Compromise, meets with little favor. The old gentleman is sincere; but, like all other men of his age, he is not up to the wants of the time. Present exigencies demand young, brave, honest men, who are not cumber
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