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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 25, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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China (China) (search for this): article 28
n a square. It is surrounded by a turreted wall, with towers at short intervals; outside of this wall is a deep ditch, and beyond this enclosure a circle of suburbs, as densely peopled, as busy, and as compact as is Pekin itself. The capital of China consists, in fact, of two cities, the North, or Imperial City, and the South City. The former is called the City of Tartars; the latter the City of the Chinese. They are separated by a turreted wall, and communicated only by three gate, of whic, painted in the grandest colors, and surmounted by pointed roofs. As for the carriages of the Pekin grandees, they are described as resembling "boxes of soap set upon wheels," and drawn by oxen harnessed in the roughest possible fashion. Pekin contains nothing analogous to the handsome public buildings which adorn the capitals of Europe. Even the imperial palace shows no attempt at architectural design, and is, like all Chinese erections, a mere shapeless agglomeration of walls and roofs.
Pekin (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 28
The peculiarities of Pekin. --The news of the capture of Pekin by the Allies imparts additional interest to the peculiarities of that cPekin by the Allies imparts additional interest to the peculiarities of that city. A letter from the seat of war in the Monsieur de L' Armee states that Pekin is built in the form of a polygon, its northern portion offPekin is built in the form of a polygon, its northern portion offering a parallelogram, and its southern portion a square. It is surrounded by a turreted wall, with towers at short intervals; outside of thircle of suburbs, as densely peopled, as busy, and as compact as is Pekin itself. The capital of China consists, in fact, of two cities, the, it is said, takes a month to go once over. The population of Pekin and its suburbs exceeds two millions. Sixteen gates communicate betthe narrow pavements. The Chinese are fond of raree-shows, and Pekin contains many exhibitions of puppets, learned animals, dancers and ls," and drawn by oxen harnessed in the roughest possible fashion. Pekin contains nothing analogous to the handsome public buildings which a