hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
B. Anderson 58 2 Browse Search
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) 48 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 42 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 36 0 Browse Search
Cook 18 0 Browse Search
1861 AD 17 17 Browse Search
John B. Floyd 13 1 Browse Search
King 12 0 Browse Search
Garibaldi 9 1 Browse Search
Christmas 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 31, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 4 total hits in 2 results.

Drogheda (Irish Republic) (search for this): article 16
"a Black Man." --The Argus, published in the city of Drogheda, Ireland, tells its readers that the election by the Northern States of America of a black man as President has at length brought about a state of feeling between the Southern and Northern States which for a long time has been feared, and which threatens to end in the disruption of the American Union. Since the Confederation was formed, no Presidential election has excited so much party feeling as has the election of Abraham Lincoln, a black gentleman, hitherto unknown out of the State in which he lived--or at least unknown as a public man in Europe.
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 16
"a Black Man." --The Argus, published in the city of Drogheda, Ireland, tells its readers that the election by the Northern States of America of a black man as President has at length brought about a state of feeling between the Southern and Northern States which for a long time has been feared, and which threatens to end in the disruption of the American Union. Since the Confederation was formed, no Presidential election has excited so much party feeling as has the election of Abraham Lincoln, a black gentleman, hitherto unknown out of the State in which he lived--or at least unknown as a public man in Europe.