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Vergennes (Vermont, United States) (search for this): article 3
government and Great Britain, he was an eager aspirant for the perils and honors of naval heroism. His public career commenced with a midshipman's warrant, dated June 18, 1812. The order accompanying it, directed him to repair at once to his station in the flag-ship of our fleet upon Lake Champlain. With this fleet he continued guarding our frontier against the enemy's invasion by water during the summer, and watching against his approach upon the ice by winter, to destroy our vessels at Vergennes.--He was at his post, on board the Saratoga, on the memorable 11th of September, 1814, when the British squadron bore down upon Commodore McDonough in Plattsburgh Bay. During the engagement on this day Midshipman Platt acted in the capacity of Commodore's Aid. His duty, accordingly, required him to pass repeatedly through the line of contending fleets. The fire of the enemy was directed upon his open boat whenever the lifting clouds of smoke exposed his open boat to view. Our fellow-to
Newburg, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 3
Death of Commodore Platt. Another of our most eminent public servants has gone to his final rest. Commodore Charles T. Platt, the aid of Commodore McDonough in the battle of Lake Champlain, and late commander of the Albany, in the home squadron, died at Newburg, New York, on the 12th inst., in the sixty-sixth year of his age. Commodore Platt was born at Plattsburgh. N. Y. on the 10th of October, 1795. His father was the proprietary of that township. The son was left, while a child, in the dependence of orphanage. The shelter of his boyhood was found under the roof of Judge Jonas Platt, and with Charles Z. Platt, at Albany, then Treasurer of the State. On the outbreak of hostilities between this government and Great Britain, he was an eager aspirant for the perils and honors of naval heroism. His public career commenced with a midshipman's warrant, dated June 18, 1812. The order accompanying it, directed him to repair at once to his station in the flag-ship of our fleet
United States (United States) (search for this): article 3
bb, Esq., who was in that action, says that Lord Provost surveyed this action from Judge Platt's piazza. Their aim was not effectual in intercepting his communication of orders, though his hat, his coat, and finally his boat, were penetrated, and the ship was with difficulty regained.--Congress voted to him a sword, in testimony of his gallantry on this occasion. After subsequent services as lieutenant in the Mediterranean squadron, he was in 1829 acting as executive officer of the United States ship Fulton, then the receiving ship at Brooklyn Navy-Yard. In the catastrophe of the 4th of June, when the magazine of this ship exploded, he received his most serious bodily injuries. With his face lacerated, his jaw broken, his shoulder maimed, the flesh torn from his limbs, and contusions blackening his body, life seemed scarcely to have a tenement left for itself; and identified no longer by his visage, but by his uniform, he was laid and reported among the dead. The explosio
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 3
e squadron, died at Newburg, New York, on the 12th inst., in the sixty-sixth year of his age. Commodore Platt was born at Plattsburgh. N. Y. on the 10th of October, 1795. His father was the proprietary of that township. The son was left, while a child, in the dependence of orphanage. The shelter of his boyhood was found under the roof of Judge Jonas Platt, and with Charles Z. Platt, at Albany, then Treasurer of the State. On the outbreak of hostilities between this government and Great Britain, he was an eager aspirant for the perils and honors of naval heroism. His public career commenced with a midshipman's warrant, dated June 18, 1812. The order accompanying it, directed him to repair at once to his station in the flag-ship of our fleet upon Lake Champlain. With this fleet he continued guarding our frontier against the enemy's invasion by water during the summer, and watching against his approach upon the ice by winter, to destroy our vessels at Vergennes.--He was at his
Plattsburg (New York, United States) (search for this): article 3
Death of Commodore Platt. Another of our most eminent public servants has gone to his final rest. Commodore Charles T. Platt, the aid of Commodore McDonough in the battle of Lake Champlain, and late commander of the Albany, in the home squadron, died at Newburg, New York, on the 12th inst., in the sixty-sixth year of his age. Commodore Platt was born at Plattsburgh. N. Y. on the 10th of October, 1795. His father was the proprietary of that township. The son was left, while a child, in the dependence of orphanage. The shelter of his boyhood was found under the roof of Judge Jonas Platt, and with Charles Z. Platt, at Albany, then Treasurer of the State. On the outbreak of hostilities between this government and Great Britain, he was an eager aspirant for the perils and honors of naval heroism. His public career commenced with a midshipman's warrant, dated June 18, 1812. The order accompanying it, directed him to repair at once to his station in the flag-ship of our fleet
eaning, who was crushed by a timber falling upon his head. The injuries to Charles were but slight gashes, which soon healed. He saw his father, with other bleeding officers, lying in the bottom of the boat that conveyed them to the shore, but he immediately swooned again, and did not recover his consciousness until they were placed in the ship-house at the Navy Dock Yard. He then crept to the line of bodies supposed to be dead, and recognized his father, loosened his cravat and appealed to the crowd to retire and give him chance for breath, for life was still there. The surgeons re-examined the Commodore and discovered animation.--No fragment of a body that could be identified as that of the gunner was ever found. A whole crew for a ship lying at the yard, and a company of officers, with Commodore Chauncey, had left the Fulton but fifteen minutes before the explosion. The ravage of this nearly fatal disaster left a sequel of disfigurement and pain that never forsook his frame.
Charles H. Platt (search for this): article 3
entified no longer by his visage, but by his uniform, he was laid and reported among the dead. The explosion of the magazine of the Fulton occurred while the officers and a small company of guests were dining in the cabin.--Among the party were Lieut. Breckenridge. United States Navy, who was killed. His only wound being the puncture of a bayonet through his forehead. His wife, who sat at his side while dining, was severely wounded.--Com. Platt occupied the head of the table, the Rev. Chas. H. Platt, then a lad of 6 years, sat at his left, over whom a waiter was leaning, who was crushed by a timber falling upon his head. The injuries to Charles were but slight gashes, which soon healed. He saw his father, with other bleeding officers, lying in the bottom of the boat that conveyed them to the shore, but he immediately swooned again, and did not recover his consciousness until they were placed in the ship-house at the Navy Dock Yard. He then crept to the line of bodies suppose
Charles Z. Platt (search for this): article 3
in the dependence of orphanage. The shelter of his boyhood was found under the roof of Judge Jonas Platt, and with Charles Z. Platt, at Albany, then Treasurer of the State. On the outbreak of hostilities between this government and Great Britain, when the British squadron bore down upon Commodore McDonough in Plattsburgh Bay. During the engagement on this day Midshipman Platt acted in the capacity of Commodore's Aid. His duty, accordingly, required him to pass repeatedly through the line oview. Our fellow-townsman, E. R. Cobb, Esq., who was in that action, says that Lord Provost surveyed this action from Judge Platt's piazza. Their aim was not effectual in intercepting his communication of orders, though his hat, his coat, and finaing the puncture of a bayonet through his forehead. His wife, who sat at his side while dining, was severely wounded.--Com. Platt occupied the head of the table, the Rev. Chas. H. Platt, then a lad of 6 years, sat at his left, over whom a waiter was
Breckenridge (search for this): article 3
he received his most serious bodily injuries. With his face lacerated, his jaw broken, his shoulder maimed, the flesh torn from his limbs, and contusions blackening his body, life seemed scarcely to have a tenement left for itself; and identified no longer by his visage, but by his uniform, he was laid and reported among the dead. The explosion of the magazine of the Fulton occurred while the officers and a small company of guests were dining in the cabin.--Among the party were Lieut. Breckenridge. United States Navy, who was killed. His only wound being the puncture of a bayonet through his forehead. His wife, who sat at his side while dining, was severely wounded.--Com. Platt occupied the head of the table, the Rev. Chas. H. Platt, then a lad of 6 years, sat at his left, over whom a waiter was leaning, who was crushed by a timber falling upon his head. The injuries to Charles were but slight gashes, which soon healed. He saw his father, with other bleeding officers, lying
McDonough (search for this): article 3
Death of Commodore Platt. Another of our most eminent public servants has gone to his final rest. Commodore Charles T. Platt, the aid of Commodore McDonough in the battle of Lake Champlain, and late commander of the Albany, in the home squadron, died at Newburg, New York, on the 12th inst., in the sixty-sixth year of his age. Commodore Platt was born at Plattsburgh. N. Y. on the 10th of October, 1795. His father was the proprietary of that township. The son was left, while a child,uring the summer, and watching against his approach upon the ice by winter, to destroy our vessels at Vergennes.--He was at his post, on board the Saratoga, on the memorable 11th of September, 1814, when the British squadron bore down upon Commodore McDonough in Plattsburgh Bay. During the engagement on this day Midshipman Platt acted in the capacity of Commodore's Aid. His duty, accordingly, required him to pass repeatedly through the line of contending fleets. The fire of the enemy was dir
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