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Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
hen expressed would prove only fears, but from what he had heard, it almost seemed us if the other side of the chamber desired to bring about a civil war. South Carolina had declared herself separated from the Union, while other States stand ready to support her, or else to put her down. That is the real issue, and there is no use to disguise it. We are not permitted to ignore the fact that the determination to secede is not confined to South Carolina alone, for next week Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, will separate from the Union; a week after Georgia will follow them; a little latter Louisiana will secede, and soon after her Arkansas. Now, then, shall we recognize South Carolina as a free and independent State, or shall we coerce by force? He argued that the people of South Carolina had a right to declare themselves free; it was an inherent, inalienable right.--South Carolina had, by the voice of her people, met in convention, in 1860, and repealed the ordinance made by
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 1
peace and return to their original state." He (Mr. Benjamin) said that a sectional President had been elected, who could, with the aid of a sectional Senate, grant all the benefits to and appoint from one section all the officers in the gift of the government, and thus ruin the South. Suppose that South Carolina is in error in believing that wrong has been done her, still that does not alter the issue whether we shall permit her to withdraw or force her back. In reply to the Senator from Wisconsin (Mr. Doolittle,) he (Mr. Benjamin) claimed that a citizen was bound to obey his State government. The Republican Senators say that they will not coerce a State, but enforce the laws against individuals. But how can they punish an individual in a State for treason? Where are they to find the judge and jury to do so, when all the citizens in the State think that he has done right? He (Mr. Benjamin) said they could not blockade a port without declaring war; they could not embargo one port
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
information of the position of affairs in South Carolina, but in the absence of it he should assumehamber desired to bring about a civil war. South Carolina had declared herself separated from the Undetermination to secede is not confined to South Carolina alone, for next week Mississippi, Alabama,r Arkansas. Now, then, shall we recognize South Carolina as a free and independent State, or shall ce by force? He argued that the people of South Carolina had a right to declare themselves free; it was an inherent, inalienable right.--South Carolina had, by the voice of her people, met in conventdenied, where is the remedy? Suppose that South Carolina should send two Senators here, and the majajority to repair the wrong? Suppose that South Carolina should then withdraw from the Union, who cear to the North, but does appear clear to South Carolina--suppose she is denied access to the Terrint, and thus ruin the South. Suppose that South Carolina is in error in believing that wrong has be
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 1
alienable right.--South Carolina had, by the voice of her people, met in convention, in 1860, and repealed the ordinance made by her people when they met in convention in 1788. Mr. Benjamin here quoted from a speech of Daniel Webster's, in the Rhode Island case, to show that a convention of the people duly assembled had proper authority. He (Mr. Webster) had said that a compact was not binding on one party unless the other parties to it lived up to it, and that a compact broken by one could be nstitution requiring force to be used to coerce a State.--He referred to the old Confederation, and said that line States seceded from it for the express reason that the compact between them was not kept, and finally all the States seceded but Rhode Island and North Carolina, leaving them as foreign States. He claimed this as a precedent in the formation of the present Constitution to show the right of a State to secede. Who was to be the judge if a compact was broken? If a compact was br
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
the other parties to it lived up to it, and that a compact broken by one could be broken by all. Mr. Benjamin here quoted from Mr. Madison to sustain his position. He (Mr. Benjamin) said that no one could find any article in the Constitution requiring force to be used to coerce a State.--He referred to the old Confederation, and said that line States seceded from it for the express reason that the compact between them was not kept, and finally all the States seceded but Rhode Island and North Carolina, leaving them as foreign States. He claimed this as a precedent in the formation of the present Constitution to show the right of a State to secede. Who was to be the judge if a compact was broken? If a compact was broken in a pecuniary matter, the Constitution provided a way to settle the matter; but if it was broken politically, the Constitution provided no way.--He read from the debates of the Convention which formed the Constitution to show that the members of that Convention
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
it almost seemed us if the other side of the chamber desired to bring about a civil war. South Carolina had declared herself separated from the Union, while other States stand ready to support her, or else to put her down. That is the real issue, and there is no use to disguise it. We are not permitted to ignore the fact that the determination to secede is not confined to South Carolina alone, for next week Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, will separate from the Union; a week after Georgia will follow them; a little latter Louisiana will secede, and soon after her Arkansas. Now, then, shall we recognize South Carolina as a free and independent State, or shall we coerce by force? He argued that the people of South Carolina had a right to declare themselves free; it was an inherent, inalienable right.--South Carolina had, by the voice of her people, met in convention, in 1860, and repealed the ordinance made by her people when they met in convention in 1788. Mr. Benjamin here
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
he chamber desired to bring about a civil war. South Carolina had declared herself separated from the Union, while other States stand ready to support her, or else to put her down. That is the real issue, and there is no use to disguise it. We are not permitted to ignore the fact that the determination to secede is not confined to South Carolina alone, for next week Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, will separate from the Union; a week after Georgia will follow them; a little latter Louisiana will secede, and soon after her Arkansas. Now, then, shall we recognize South Carolina as a free and independent State, or shall we coerce by force? He argued that the people of South Carolina had a right to declare themselves free; it was an inherent, inalienable right.--South Carolina had, by the voice of her people, met in convention, in 1860, and repealed the ordinance made by her people when they met in convention in 1788. Mr. Benjamin here quoted from a speech of Daniel Webster's,
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 1
war. South Carolina had declared herself separated from the Union, while other States stand ready to support her, or else to put her down. That is the real issue, and there is no use to disguise it. We are not permitted to ignore the fact that the determination to secede is not confined to South Carolina alone, for next week Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, will separate from the Union; a week after Georgia will follow them; a little latter Louisiana will secede, and soon after her Arkansas. Now, then, shall we recognize South Carolina as a free and independent State, or shall we coerce by force? He argued that the people of South Carolina had a right to declare themselves free; it was an inherent, inalienable right.--South Carolina had, by the voice of her people, met in convention, in 1860, and repealed the ordinance made by her people when they met in convention in 1788. Mr. Benjamin here quoted from a speech of Daniel Webster's, in the Rhode Island case, to show that a c
of her people, met in convention, in 1860, and repealed the ordinance made by her people when they met in convention in 1788. Mr. Benjamin here quoted from a speech of Daniel Webster's, in the Rhode Island case, to show that a convention of the people duly assembled had proper authority. He (Mr. Webster) had said that a compact was not binding on one party unless the other parties to it lived up to it, and that a compact broken by one could be broken by all. Mr. Benjamin here quoted from Mr. Madison to sustain his position. He (Mr. Benjamin) said that no one could find any article in the Constitution requiring force to be used to coerce a State.--He referred to the old Confederation, and said that line States seceded from it for the express reason that the compact between them was not kept, and finally all the States seceded but Rhode Island and North Carolina, leaving them as foreign States. He claimed this as a precedent in the formation of the present Constitution to show the ri
we are bound by our oaths; if you attempt it, your people will be hanged for treason. We have examined this instrument thoroughly, and we cannot find any warrant in it for releasing ourselves from the obligation of giving you all these benefits, and our oaths force us to tax you for it. We can dispense with anything else, but we protest, upon our souls, that our consciences will be sorely worried if we do not take your money." --(Laughter.) That is the proposition of the Senator from Ohio (Mr. Wade) in plain language--"We can dispense with anything and and everything else, but how to get rid of taking your money we cannot see." [Laughter.] Now, Senators, this picture is not placed before you with any idea of acting upon any one of you, or that it will change the views or alter the conduct of any of you; all hope of that is gone. Our committee has reported this morning that no feasible scheme of adjustment can be devised. The day of adjustment is passed. If you propose to make one
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