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United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
th; and, if I am deceived. I shall only have to confess the errors of my past life, retrace my steps, and make atonement to those whom I may have misted in my too earnest zeal to act the part of peacemaker to the great National family of the United States. So far as the President of the United States and his late Attorney General, now Secretary of State, are concerned, the citadel has already been surrendered; the right to prevent any one State from breaking up the entire Confederacy has United States and his late Attorney General, now Secretary of State, are concerned, the citadel has already been surrendered; the right to prevent any one State from breaking up the entire Confederacy has been denied, and it is expected that South Carolina, profiting by this unparalleled treachery to the rest of the States, will seize upon Fort Moultrie, that has purposely been left in an almost deserted and helpless condition. What disastrous consequence may result from this weakness and cowardice on the part of the Government time alone can determine; but if civil war shall be forced upon us, with all its attendant evils, let the friends of the Union first put themselves entirely in the right
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
ave misted in my too earnest zeal to act the part of peacemaker to the great National family of the United States. So far as the President of the United States and his late Attorney General, now Secretary of State, are concerned, the citadel has already been surrendered; the right to prevent any one State from breaking up the entire Confederacy has been denied, and it is expected that South Carolina, profiting by this unparalleled treachery to the rest of the States, will seize upon Fort Moultrie, that has purposely been left in an almost deserted and helpless condition. What disastrous consequence may result from this weakness and cowardice on the part of the Government time alone can determine; but if civil war shall be forced upon us, with all its attendant evils, let the friends of the Union first put themselves entirely in the right, in every particular, let no just ground of complaint exist against them — do all they can to prevent strife, then act on the defensive; but ac
New England (United States) (search for this): article 1
a voice which all must hear and obey: The Union must and shall be preserved! Richmond, Monday, Dec, 17, 1860. Dear Sir: When I answered your kind letter of invitation on behalf of the Committee of Arrangements, to dine with the New England Society on the 22d inst., I entertained strong hopes that it would be in my power to attend. Yesterday I received another letter from our friend Mr. Stetson renewing the invitation, and urging its acceptance, that we might commune together onamily what becomes of me; but I do ask it, I entreat it, and, without meaning to be presumptuous. I demand it, for your own sakes, and for the sake of a common country, which now hangs suspended by a hair, awaiting the decision of the sons of New England, the descendants of the Pilgrim Fathers, whose spirits will look down upon you at the festive board, and add their entreaties to mine, that you will save us from a common and inevitable ruin, by exerting the influence you hold, each one with h
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
ts with you, gentlemen of the North, to determine the question, and there is no time for delay. I have given abundant proof that I do not sympathize with South Carolina in her rash and impetuous action. If she is determined to go let us do all that men can do to prevent any other State from following her pernicious example. his particular followers, but all of whom would be abandoned if such a policy were pursued; for I do not believe there is a majority in any one of the States (South Carolina excepted, and we may count her out for the present,) that would claim more as a condition of their adhesion to the Union than they would be fairly entitled to the citadel has already been surrendered; the right to prevent any one State from breaking up the entire Confederacy has been denied, and it is expected that South Carolina, profiting by this unparalleled treachery to the rest of the States, will seize upon Fort Moultrie, that has purposely been left in an almost deserted and hel
John M. Botts (search for this): article 1
Letter from Hon. John M. Botts. The following letter was read at the dinner given by the New England Society of New York, on the 22d inst., in response to this sentiment: 4 The American Union--the great trust which we hold for succeeding ages. The love of it is still uppermost in the hearts of the people. This love of the whole people for the whole country will overwhelm all discontents and disaffections of all parts and of all parties, and declare, with a voice which all must hearfrom this weakness and cowardice on the part of the Government time alone can determine; but if civil war shall be forced upon us, with all its attendant evils, let the friends of the Union first put themselves entirely in the right, in every particular, let no just ground of complaint exist against them — do all they can to prevent strife, then act on the defensive; but act with a vigor that will make their enemies respect them. I am, with great respect, your ob't. serv't. John M. Botts.
erwhelm all discontents and disaffections of all parts and of all parties, and declare, with a voice which all must hear and obey: The Union must and shall be preserved! Richmond, Monday, Dec, 17, 1860. Dear Sir: When I answered your kind letter of invitation on behalf of the Committee of Arrangements, to dine with the New England Society on the 22d inst., I entertained strong hopes that it would be in my power to attend. Yesterday I received another letter from our friend Mr. Stetson renewing the invitation, and urging its acceptance, that we might commune together on the condition of the nation; but I cannot leave home, and deeply regret the necessity which compels me to decline it. I feel that I have been singularly unfortunate in never having had it in my power to accept any one of the numerous invitations to these Pilgrim meetings with which I have been honored; but necessity has no law, and I must submit. One thing that reconciles me to the disappointment i
ave said it where it was no light matter to say it — when I stood as one singled out from a whole community, but I say also that the North, by the passage of the Personal Liberty bills, so far as they were designed to obstruct the execution of the Fugitive Slave Law, and by the general interference of their citizens with the subject of slavery in the States, have done great wrong to the South. Both have done wrong, and both must repair the errors of the past. You tell me again, that Mr. Lincoln and the party he represents have no design to interfere with the relation of master and slaves in the States where slavery exists by law. I answer, I believe it--nay, I know it--I know that the foulest misrepresentations are constantly made, and industriously circulated, by mischievous men and mischievous papers, to inflame the public mind; I know that great misunderstanding prevails between the two sections of the country, but to which. I thank my Maker, I have never by word or deed con
Letter from Hon. John M. Botts. The following letter was read at the dinner given by the New England Society of New York, on the 22d inst., in response to this sentiment: 4 The American Union--the great trust which we hold for succeeding ages. The love of it is still uppermost in the hearts of the people. This love of the whole people for the whole country will overwhelm all discontents and disaffections of all parts and of all parties, and declare, with a voice which all must hear and obey: The Union must and shall be preserved! Richmond, Monday, Dec, 17, 1860. Dear Sir: When I answered your kind letter of invitation on behalf of the Committee of Arrangements, to dine with the New England Society on the 22d inst., I entertained strong hopes that it would be in my power to attend. Yesterday I received another letter from our friend Mr. Stetson renewing the invitation, and urging its acceptance, that we might commune together on the condition of the natio
March 4th (search for this): article 1
each section extend to the other forgiveness for the past and security for the future. There is but one person alive whose position would entitle him to speak for the whole, and whose voice is sufficiently potential to allay the impending strife. I could wish that in this extreme exigency of the State, surrounded as we are with danger on every side, that he could find it compatible with his sense of propriety to anticipate, by a few weeks, the duty that will devolve upon him on the 4th of March, and indicate a policy, as I feel assured he would, that would relieve all present uneasiness, and afford more time for ultimate settlement of details. There are a great many intemperate and unreasonable men in the South each one of whom has his particular followers, but all of whom would be abandoned if such a policy were pursued; for I do not believe there is a majority in any one of the States (South Carolina excepted, and we may count her out for the present,) that would claim mo
December 17th, 1860 AD (search for this): article 1
ven by the New England Society of New York, on the 22d inst., in response to this sentiment: 4 The American Union--the great trust which we hold for succeeding ages. The love of it is still uppermost in the hearts of the people. This love of the whole people for the whole country will overwhelm all discontents and disaffections of all parts and of all parties, and declare, with a voice which all must hear and obey: The Union must and shall be preserved! Richmond, Monday, Dec, 17, 1860. Dear Sir: When I answered your kind letter of invitation on behalf of the Committee of Arrangements, to dine with the New England Society on the 22d inst., I entertained strong hopes that it would be in my power to attend. Yesterday I received another letter from our friend Mr. Stetson renewing the invitation, and urging its acceptance, that we might commune together on the condition of the nation; but I cannot leave home, and deeply regret the necessity which compels me to declin