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ort Nelson that the Constellation was anchored when the battle of Craney Island was fought. The Constellation was anchored off that island while the men were engaged in throwing up that fortification, but when it was complete, she hauled up and anchored in the stream as above stated. At that time a large number of troops were collected at this point, and Fort Norfolk was garrisoned under Gen. Robert B. Taylor, who was succeeded by Gen. Porter.--Troops continued to occupy this garrison until 1815, when peace was declared, and the soldiers allowed to return to their homes. Since that time to this, now forty-odd years, there has been no garrison at Fort Norfolk. The fortification is so constructed, the bastion and circle so complete, that it not only commands the channel of the river, but sweeps the whole country around in every direction. There are no casemates or embrasures in it, but all guns have to be mounted on the parapet and fired over the ramparts. Fort Norfolk is about
with interest. And here comes in our joke. When the Star of the West turned tail, and it became evident that she would approach no closer, the young fellows under orders became clamorous and eager for "a shot any how." "Well," says the Major, (Ripley,) jumping upon the parapet, "fire away, boys, but you'll all be in — in five minutes." The boys did fire; but the Major's prediction was not fulfilled. Major Ripley was twice brevetted for gallantry during the Mexican war. Condition of ForMajor Ripley was twice brevetted for gallantry during the Mexican war. Condition of Fort Sumter. Sergeant Geo. McFadden, formerly a soldier in the United States Army, and who was one of the laborers recently sent away from Fort Sumter, gives an account of the condition of that fort very different from what generally obtains. The account is furnished to the New York Post: "Fort Moultrie was in a much better condition for defence than Fort Sumter; nearly all the guns were mounted, and everything was in apple-pie order, and the men in good condition; three days before we r
Springfield, January 16. --The Democratic State Convention met at the State-House this morning. Ninety-three out of the hundred and two counties were represented. Resolutions were adopted by an almost unanimous vote, declaring that it is the prompting of patriotism and dictate of wisdom to make an earnest effort to save the Union by conciliation and concession; therefore, we are willing to accept the amendments to the Con- stitution proposed in the United States Senate by Senator Douglas and Senator Crittenden, and the border State proposition, or any other whereby harmony may be restored between the people of the different sections of the country. Therefore, we earnestly entreat the Federal Government and the seceding States to withhold the arm of military power, and on no pretext whatever bring the nation to the horrors of a civil war, until the people can take such action as the troubles demand. We recognize and declare it to be the duty of the Federal Gove
Winfield Scott (search for this): article 1
The National crisis. views of Gen. Scott--a look inside of Fort Moultrie--condition of Fort Sumter--Fort Norfolk--Illinois Democrati--Expression of opinion in Philadelphia, &c., &c. Views of General Scott. The following are the views of Gen. Scott, as transmitted Gen. Scott, as transmitted to the President on the 29th of October: To save time, the right of secession may be conceded, and instantly balanced by the correlativethe idea of invading a seceded State. October 29, 1860. Winfield Scott.Gen. Scott, --In forts or on board ships-of-war. ThGen. Scott, --In forts or on board ships-of-war. The great aim and object of this plan was to gain time — say eight or ten months--to await expected measures of conciliation on the part of the e subsidence of angry feelings in the opposite quarter. Lieut. General Scott's respects to the Secretary of War to say: That a copy garrison or reinforce the forts mentioned in the "Views." General Scott is all solicitude for the safety of the Union. He is, however,
January 16th (search for this): article 1
embers, on account of their engagements, cannot belong to the volunteer regiment proper. The "Life Guard" will only be called out when the emergency is such as to require a larger force than can be furnished by the uniformed regiment of the city — in other words, when the services of the militia are needed, they will promptly take the field. At some future day they hope to be able to procure rifles. Illinois Democratic Convention--important resolutions on the crisis. Springfield, January 16. --The Democratic State Convention met at the State-House this morning. Ninety-three out of the hundred and two counties were represented. Resolutions were adopted by an almost unanimous vote, declaring that it is the prompting of patriotism and dictate of wisdom to make an earnest effort to save the Union by conciliation and concession; therefore, we are willing to accept the amendments to the Con- stitution proposed in the United States Senate by Senator Douglas and Senator
February 12th (search for this): article 1
sion at the South, as violations of the Constitution. That in the opinion of this Convention the employment of a military force by the Federal Government to coerce into submission the seceding States, will inevitably plunge the country in a civil war, and entirely extinguish all hope for a settlement of the fearful issues now pending before the country. We recommend the repeal of all Personal Liberty bills, and recommend a National Convention, to be held at Louisville, Ky., on the 12th of February, to take into consideration the present perilous state of the country, and recommend to the people such just concessions and such amendments to the Constitution as will produce harmony and fraternal feeling throughout the Union, said Convention to consist of one delegate from each Congressional district, and two at large from each of the thirty-three States. We request that the Legislatures of the several States take steps for the holding of State Conventions to carry out the aforesaid
the brave officers and men under your command, by giving you, without delay, the needful reinforcements and supplies. I have the honor to remain, dear sir, your most obedient servant, Wm. D. Lewis. To Major Robert Anderson, U. S. Artillery, Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston, South Carolina. [Major Anderson's Reply.] (Copy.) Fort Sumter, S. C., Jan. 12, 1861. Wm. D. Lewis. Esq., Philadelphia.--Dear Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 7th inst., enclosing a copy of the proceedings of a public meeting held in Philadelphia on the 5th inst. I will not attempt to express the feelings which such an approval of my poor efforts to do my duty excites, but will now merely thank you personally for the handsome manner in which you have performed your part as presiding officer of the meeting, and for the flattering terms of your letter of transmittal. Hoping that by the blessing of God the impending storm may be dispersed without b
Robert Anderson (search for this): article 1
recommendations. The late Philadelphia meeting and Maj. Anderson. The following correspondence has been published: r, your most obedient servant, Wm. D. Lewis. To Major Robert Anderson, U. S. Artillery, Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston, South Carolina. [Major Anderson's Reply.] (Copy.) Fort Sumter, S. C., Jan. 12, 1861. Wm. D. Lewis. Esq., Philear sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Robert Anderson, Major U. S. A. Expression of opinion in Philad the look of the interior. The cannon disabled by Major Anderson still lie in picturesque confusion, all smoke-stained onstantly passing it.--Fort Sumter has no provisions. Major Anderson took from Fort Moultrie some fifty barrels of flour anort is in a perfect state of incompleteness, and as to Major Anderson being able to defend it — unless he is not attacked — and raise the ladders for the men to scale the walls. Major Anderson never asked the workmen to stay and fight under the Am
orcements and supplies. I have the honor to remain, dear sir, your most obedient servant, Wm. D. Lewis. To Major Robert Anderson, U. S. Artillery, Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston, South Carolina. [Major Anderson's Reply.] (Copy.) Fort Sumter, S. C., Jan. 12, 1861. Wm. D. Lewis. Esq., Philadelphia.--Dear Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 7th inst., enclosing a copy of the proceedings of a public meeting held in Philadelphia on the 5th inst. I will not attempt to express the feelings which such an approval of my poor efforts to do my duty excites, but will now merely thank you personally for the handsome manner in which you have performed your part as presiding officer of the meeting, and for the flattering terms of your letter of transmittal. Hoping that by the blessing of God the impending storm may be dispersed without bloodshed, I am, dear sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Robert Anderson, Major
October 29th (search for this): article 1
The National crisis. views of Gen. Scott--a look inside of Fort Moultrie--condition of Fort Sumter--Fort Norfolk--Illinois Democratic Convention--Expression of opinion in Philadelphia, &c., &c. Views of General Scott. The following are the views of Gen. Scott, as transmitted to the President on the 29th of October: To save time, the right of secession may be conceded, and instantly balanced by the correlative right, on the part of the Federal Government, against an inferior State or States, to re-establish by force, if necessary, its former continuity of territory.--[Paley's Moral and Political Philosophy, last chapter.] But break this glorious Union by whatever line or lines that political madness may contrive, and there would be no hope of reuniting the fragments except by the laceration and despotism of the sword. To effect such result the intestine wars of our Mexican neighbors would, in comparison with ours, sink into mere child's play. A smal
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