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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Stuart (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 21
harged his revolver, but nobody could be seen. A guard was dispatched to find the cause of the wandering missile, but to no use, and it yet remains a mystery as to who shot the ball. His wound is properly dressed, and we hope for his early recovery. I am happy to hear that Capt. McCarrick, so nobly engaged in the service of the South in the capture of the two vessels heretofore spoken of, also took eighteen prisoners. A large ship, with about 750 bags of coffee, went ashore off Cape Henry Monday night. She has been secured by our men, who are glad to realize such a prize with this cargo. Col. Huger makes a strong appeal to our people for the observance of the 4th of July. From the preparations we hear taking place, the day will pass off most patriotically. Flag presentations will take place to-day and to-morrow, and an interesting time is in store. Mayor Lamb will be the presenter of the one to be presented to-day, which he will do in behalf of the ladies of Norf
Old Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 21
of our most respected officers at this station. Lieut. M. jumped on board, drew his revolver, and would have shot the rascal in presence of the whole crew, but for the timely prevention of a number of our men. This took place on Monday, a flag of truce having gone down on that day. Our men are not to be insulted by the base hirelings of Abe Lincoln, who pay no regard to even innocent women who plead protection at their hands. Troops have been taken from Newport News and stationed at Old Point. It is stated this morning that the Hygeia Hotel was consumed by fire last night. I place no confidence in the rumor. Another account is that a Federal steamer in the Roads had met with the same fate; but confirmation is wanting in either case. I regret to say that one of our picket guards belonging to the Alabama Regiment, was shot through the arm at his post. He instantly discharged his revolver, but nobody could be seen. A guard was dispatched to find the cause of the wanderin
From Norfolk.[special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Norfolk, Va., July 3, 1861. I yesterday saw the letter of Pyle, the accomplice of one C. W. Bryan, mention of whom was made as attempting to give information to the enemy. It was written to his mother in Washington, and is filled with falsehoods from beginning to end. He says that he will be forced to take the cath of allegiance to the South, if he remains in Portsmouth — a thing he will never do, until starvation shall be the mea allusion to the Stars and Stripes on the Lincoln ships in our waters, but says he cannot get to them. He longs to be with the hordes of Abolition, and would gladly assist in the subjugation of our soil. He says there are but 7,000 troops here. Pyle, when last seen, was going down the river in a small boat, and has so far escaped the vigilance of the police. I hear that a man, whose name I did not learn, was arrested as a spy on yesterday, and brought to headquarters, Col. Huger. He was
t a man, whose name I did not learn, was arrested as a spy on yesterday, and brought to headquarters, Col. Huger. He was considerably confused in the answering of questions put to him, and gave several accounts of himself. He will probably come before military authority. More stringent measures should be adopted for the disposal of these scoundrels who hover around us to give information to the enemy. One of the Lincoln scoundrels on board the Cumberland, came near being shot by Lieut. Milligan, one of our most respected officers at this station. Lieut. M. jumped on board, drew his revolver, and would have shot the rascal in presence of the whole crew, but for the timely prevention of a number of our men. This took place on Monday, a flag of truce having gone down on that day. Our men are not to be insulted by the base hirelings of Abe Lincoln, who pay no regard to even innocent women who plead protection at their hands. Troops have been taken from Newport News and stati
Abe Lincoln (search for this): article 21
over around us to give information to the enemy. One of the Lincoln scoundrels on board the Cumberland, came near being shot by Lieut. Milligan, one of our most respected officers at this station. Lieut. M. jumped on board, drew his revolver, and would have shot the rascal in presence of the whole crew, but for the timely prevention of a number of our men. This took place on Monday, a flag of truce having gone down on that day. Our men are not to be insulted by the base hirelings of Abe Lincoln, who pay no regard to even innocent women who plead protection at their hands. Troops have been taken from Newport News and stationed at Old Point. It is stated this morning that the Hygeia Hotel was consumed by fire last night. I place no confidence in the rumor. Another account is that a Federal steamer in the Roads had met with the same fate; but confirmation is wanting in either case. I regret to say that one of our picket guards belonging to the Alabama Regiment, was sho
C. W. Bryan (search for this): article 21
From Norfolk.[special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Norfolk, Va., July 3, 1861. I yesterday saw the letter of Pyle, the accomplice of one C. W. Bryan, mention of whom was made as attempting to give information to the enemy. It was written to his mother in Washington, and is filled with falsehoods from beginning to end. He says that he will be forced to take the cath of allegiance to the South, if he remains in Portsmouth — a thing he will never do, until starvation shall be the means to compel him — makes a bright allusion to the Stars and Stripes on the Lincoln ships in our waters, but says he cannot get to them. He longs to be with the hordes of Abolition, and would gladly assist in the subjugation of our soil. He says there are but 7,000 troops here. Pyle, when last seen, was going down the river in a small boat, and has so far escaped the vigilance of the police. I hear that a man, whose name I did not learn, was arrested as a spy on yesterday, and brought to
oops here. Pyle, when last seen, was going down the river in a small boat, and has so far escaped the vigilance of the police. I hear that a man, whose name I did not learn, was arrested as a spy on yesterday, and brought to headquarters, Col. Huger. He was considerably confused in the answering of questions put to him, and gave several accounts of himself. He will probably come before military authority. More stringent measures should be adopted for the disposal of these scoundrels whoo vessels heretofore spoken of, also took eighteen prisoners. A large ship, with about 750 bags of coffee, went ashore off Cape Henry Monday night. She has been secured by our men, who are glad to realize such a prize with this cargo. Col. Huger makes a strong appeal to our people for the observance of the 4th of July. From the preparations we hear taking place, the day will pass off most patriotically. Flag presentations will take place to-day and to-morrow, and an interesting ti
met with the same fate; but confirmation is wanting in either case. I regret to say that one of our picket guards belonging to the Alabama Regiment, was shot through the arm at his post. He instantly discharged his revolver, but nobody could be seen. A guard was dispatched to find the cause of the wandering missile, but to no use, and it yet remains a mystery as to who shot the ball. His wound is properly dressed, and we hope for his early recovery. I am happy to hear that Capt. McCarrick, so nobly engaged in the service of the South in the capture of the two vessels heretofore spoken of, also took eighteen prisoners. A large ship, with about 750 bags of coffee, went ashore off Cape Henry Monday night. She has been secured by our men, who are glad to realize such a prize with this cargo. Col. Huger makes a strong appeal to our people for the observance of the 4th of July. From the preparations we hear taking place, the day will pass off most patriotically.
t. McCarrick, so nobly engaged in the service of the South in the capture of the two vessels heretofore spoken of, also took eighteen prisoners. A large ship, with about 750 bags of coffee, went ashore off Cape Henry Monday night. She has been secured by our men, who are glad to realize such a prize with this cargo. Col. Huger makes a strong appeal to our people for the observance of the 4th of July. From the preparations we hear taking place, the day will pass off most patriotically. Flag presentations will take place to-day and to-morrow, and an interesting time is in store. Mayor Lamb will be the presenter of the one to be presented to-day, which he will do in behalf of the ladies of Norfolk. The flag is really beautiful, and is a token from the patriotic ladies of our city to Company F, also of our city. The ladies are still actively engaged in meeting the wants of our soldiers, a duty they are always pleased to perform, and we accord them all praise. Luna.
July 3rd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 21
From Norfolk.[special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Norfolk, Va., July 3, 1861. I yesterday saw the letter of Pyle, the accomplice of one C. W. Bryan, mention of whom was made as attempting to give information to the enemy. It was written to his mother in Washington, and is filled with falsehoods from beginning to end. He says that he will be forced to take the cath of allegiance to the South, if he remains in Portsmouth — a thing he will never do, until starvation shall be the means to compel him — makes a bright allusion to the Stars and Stripes on the Lincoln ships in our waters, but says he cannot get to them. He longs to be with the hordes of Abolition, and would gladly assist in the subjugation of our soil. He says there are but 7,000 troops here. Pyle, when last seen, was going down the river in a small boat, and has so far escaped the vigilance of the police. I hear that a man, whose name I did not learn, was arrested as a spy on yesterday, and brought to
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