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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Pointe Coupee (La.) (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 5
[communicated] Yorktown, June 10, 1861. To the Editors of the Dispatch: Gentlemen: In your issue of the 9th ult., you have done unintentional injustice to an active and gallant man — to Capt. John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana. You state his residence as in Louisa county, Va. In the fight between the three Southerners and nine Yankees, which occurred two days previous to the battle of Bethel, John Scott, of Louisiana, slew two of the enemy with his own hand, and took anotent of their property the quiet inhabitants of the peninsula. As a Virginian, and animated by Virginian sentiments, I say do full and ample justice to the gallant and devoted men who come from a distance to stand by us in the hour of trial.--Brave John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana, with many a regret now leaves us, to render such service as opportunity may present on a line of more active operation. Our thanks and gratitude and admiration accompany him to Manassas. A Virginian.
Louisa (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
[communicated] Yorktown, June 10, 1861. To the Editors of the Dispatch: Gentlemen: In your issue of the 9th ult., you have done unintentional injustice to an active and gallant man — to Capt. John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana. You state his residence as in Louisa county, Va. In the fight between the three Southerners and nine Yankees, which occurred two days previous to the battle of Bethel, John Scott, of Louisiana, slew two of the enemy with his own hand, and took another prisoner. His activity, ingenuity and daring has elicited the warmest praise from the commanding officer, General Magruder. To Scott, off Louisiana, belongs the credit of having inaugurated at Yorktown this system of ranger service, which has had the effect to so infinitely and effectually cow the enemy, and render secure in the enjoyment of their property the quiet inhabitants of the peninsula. As a Virginian, and animated by Virginian sentiments, I say do full and ample justice t
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 5
nt man — to Capt. John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana. You state his residence as in Louisa county, Va. In the fight between the three Southerners and nine Yankees, which occurred two days previous to the battle of Bethel, John Scott, of Louisiana, slew two of the enemy with his own hand, and took another prisoner. His activity, ingenuity and daring has elicited the warmest praise from the commanding officer, General Magruder. To Scott, off Louisiana, belongs the credit of having iLouisiana, belongs the credit of having inaugurated at Yorktown this system of ranger service, which has had the effect to so infinitely and effectually cow the enemy, and render secure in the enjoyment of their property the quiet inhabitants of the peninsula. As a Virginian, and animated by Virginian sentiments, I say do full and ample justice to the gallant and devoted men who come from a distance to stand by us in the hour of trial.--Brave John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana, with many a regret now leaves us, to render s
John Scott (search for this): article 5
ctive and gallant man — to Capt. John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana. You state his residence as in Louisa county, Va. In the fight between the three Southerners and nine Yankees, which occurred two days previous to the battle of Bethel, John Scott, of Louisiana, slew two of the enemy with his own hand, and took another prisoner. His activity, ingenuity and daring has elicited the warmest praise from the commanding officer, General Magruder. To Scott, off Louisiana, belongs the credScott, off Louisiana, belongs the credit of having inaugurated at Yorktown this system of ranger service, which has had the effect to so infinitely and effectually cow the enemy, and render secure in the enjoyment of their property the quiet inhabitants of the peninsula. As a Virginian, and animated by Virginian sentiments, I say do full and ample justice to the gallant and devoted men who come from a distance to stand by us in the hour of trial.--Brave John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana, with many a regret now leaves u
John S. Scott (search for this): article 5
[communicated] Yorktown, June 10, 1861. To the Editors of the Dispatch: Gentlemen: In your issue of the 9th ult., you have done unintentional injustice to an active and gallant man — to Capt. John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana. You state his residence as in Louisa county, Va. In the fight between the three Southerners and nine Yankees, which occurred two days previous to the battle of Bethel, John Scott, of Louisiana, slew two of the enemy with his own hand, and took anotent of their property the quiet inhabitants of the peninsula. As a Virginian, and animated by Virginian sentiments, I say do full and ample justice to the gallant and devoted men who come from a distance to stand by us in the hour of trial.--Brave John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana, with many a regret now leaves us, to render such service as opportunity may present on a line of more active operation. Our thanks and gratitude and admiration accompany him to Manassas. A Virginian.
9th ult., you have done unintentional injustice to an active and gallant man — to Capt. John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana. You state his residence as in Louisa county, Va. In the fight between the three Southerners and nine Yankees, which occurred two days previous to the battle of Bethel, John Scott, of Louisiana, slew two of the enemy with his own hand, and took another prisoner. His activity, ingenuity and daring has elicited the warmest praise from the commanding officer, General Magruder. To Scott, off Louisiana, belongs the credit of having inaugurated at Yorktown this system of ranger service, which has had the effect to so infinitely and effectually cow the enemy, and render secure in the enjoyment of their property the quiet inhabitants of the peninsula. As a Virginian, and animated by Virginian sentiments, I say do full and ample justice to the gallant and devoted men who come from a distance to stand by us in the hour of trial.--Brave John S. Scott, of P
June 10th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 5
[communicated] Yorktown, June 10, 1861. To the Editors of the Dispatch: Gentlemen: In your issue of the 9th ult., you have done unintentional injustice to an active and gallant man — to Capt. John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana. You state his residence as in Louisa county, Va. In the fight between the three Southerners and nine Yankees, which occurred two days previous to the battle of Bethel, John Scott, of Louisiana, slew two of the enemy with his own hand, and took another prisoner. His activity, ingenuity and daring has elicited the warmest praise from the commanding officer, General Magruder. To Scott, off Louisiana, belongs the credit of having inaugurated at Yorktown this system of ranger service, which has had the effect to so infinitely and effectually cow the enemy, and render secure in the enjoyment of their property the quiet inhabitants of the peninsula. As a Virginian, and animated by Virginian sentiments, I say do full and ample justice t
[communicated] Yorktown, June 10, 1861. To the Editors of the Dispatch: Gentlemen: In your issue of the 9th ult., you have done unintentional injustice to an active and gallant man — to Capt. John S. Scott, of Point Coupee, Louisiana. You state his residence as in Louisa county, Va. In the fight between the three Southerners and nine Yankees, which occurred two days previous to the battle of Bethel, John Scott, of Louisiana, slew two of the enemy with his own hand, and took another prisoner. His activity, ingenuity and daring has elicited the warmest praise from the commanding officer, General Magruder. To Scott, off Louisiana, belongs the credit of having inaugurated at Yorktown this system of ranger service, which has had the effect to so infinitely and effectually cow the enemy, and render secure in the enjoyment of their property the quiet inhabitants of the peninsula. As a Virginian, and animated by Virginian sentiments, I say do full and ample justice t