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United States (United States) (search for this): article news
found admiration of the mechanical part of the work, we will now mention that this is the only edition which is authorized by the author himself; that this edition was publish battle by copy right — and it is the first copy under the Confederate States of America. This edition is the only one which contains all the improvements and changes which the author has recently made In face of all those advantages, several spurious editions of the so called. Haroce's factious " and which are not name and the labors of the distinguished author to their own advantage, it was also due to him to have paid him the allowance, per copy published, which belonged to him. if publishers do not respect rights like these, we right in the Confederate states of America? It is against the etiquette of the trade as we understand it, to republish a non copyright book, after it is announced that the same is in press by a member of the trade; how much more so does it violate the etiquette and the pr
L. Sonnambula (search for this): article news
amous Ba --Her Eccentricities An Eastern editor observes: Lady Blessington is better known in this country than almost any other woman of title in the old country. She died at Paris, at the somewhat mature age of sixty two yet is generally supposed, by those who only know her by description, to have been then, and always, in the bloom of youth and beauty. The last time we saw her was in one of the boxes of Hor Majesty's Theater, in London, when Jenny Lind was playing Amint, in L. Sonnambula. A country consign who was with her, asked, "Who is that stout higbey rouged, and over-dressed old lady As iere were very many in the house to which this too truthful description was applicable we were unable to reply. But our fair inquirer spotted her by adding; "There? next the pillar. That fat old dowager, with the enormous turban, and, it is so odd, brides of file lace, just like whiskers, hanging down by the side of her vibrating ] heeks" The sun young lady paused for a re
county, Va July 1861 A osen Famous Ba --Her Eccentricities An Eastern editor observes: Lady Blessington is better known in this country than almost any other woman of title in the old country. She died at Paris, at the somewhat mature age of sixty two yet is generally supposed, by those who only know her by description, to have been then, and always, in the bloom of youth and beauty. The last time we saw her was in one of the boxes of Hor Majesty's Theater, in London, when Jenny Lind was playing Amint, in L. Sonnambula. A country consign who was with her, asked, "Who is that stout higbey rouged, and over-dressed old lady As iere were very many in the house to which this too truthful description was applicable we were unable to reply. But our fair inquirer spotted her by adding; "There? next the pillar. That fat old dowager, with the enormous turban, and, it is so odd, brides of file lace, just like whiskers, hanging down by the side of her vibrating ] heeks"
S. H. Goetzel (search for this): article news
dissolved bottle and cork for use. If immediate use is needed let the vinegar be warm, when the solution will be complete in a few minutes. In all cases the vinegar should be of good strength and sharpness, and a few experiments will enable any reader to determine the exact proportion.--Charleston Courier. A Mobile book-copyright --In acknowledge of a handsome copy of the Revised and new edition of the "kills and Infantry notice." by Col. W. I. Hardee, published in this city by S. H. Goetzel & Co., in two near little volume, called 24 mo., we take a pride in recognizing in them a new pro of the power of Southern independence and a new metal ornament to our city. The typographical work does a great deal of credit to the Registers Job Office in which one volume was printed, and to the printing establishment of J Y Thompson Esq for the other The lithographs are all astonishingly well done, and are pronounced by Col Hardee to be better than those in the Philadelphia ed
Thompson Esq (search for this): article news
n acknowledge of a handsome copy of the Revised and new edition of the "kills and Infantry notice." by Col. W. I. Hardee, published in this city by S. H. Goetzel & Co., in two near little volume, called 24 mo., we take a pride in recognizing in them a new pro of the power of Southern independence and a new metal ornament to our city. The typographical work does a great deal of credit to the Registers Job Office in which one volume was printed, and to the printing establishment of J Y Thompson Esq for the other The lithographs are all astonishingly well done, and are pronounced by Col Hardee to be better than those in the Philadelphia edition of the Lippineotts. Generally such diagrams are executed by wood cuts, and printed on ordinary presses — white in this instance the plates were all transferred to larger stones and the impressions taken by the slow processes of the lithographer, which is very laborious, extremity expensive and requires a great deal of time But for that,
W. I. Hardee (search for this): article news
and a few experiments will enable any reader to determine the exact proportion.--Charleston Courier. A Mobile book-copyright --In acknowledge of a handsome copy of the Revised and new edition of the "kills and Infantry notice." by Col. W. I. Hardee, published in this city by S. H. Goetzel & Co., in two near little volume, called 24 mo., we take a pride in recognizing in them a new pro of the power of Southern independence and a new metal ornament to our city. The typographical work does a great deal of credit to the Registers Job Office in which one volume was printed, and to the printing establishment of J Y Thompson Esq for the other The lithographs are all astonishingly well done, and are pronounced by Col Hardee to be better than those in the Philadelphia edition of the Lippineotts. Generally such diagrams are executed by wood cuts, and printed on ordinary presses — white in this instance the plates were all transferred to larger stones and the impressions tak
e were very many in the house to which this too truthful description was applicable we were unable to reply. But our fair inquirer spotted her by adding; "There? next the pillar. That fat old dowager, with the enormous turban, and, it is so odd, brides of file lace, just like whiskers, hanging down by the side of her vibrating ] heeks" The sun young lady paused for a reply, like Erutus in the play, and was very much astonished when she learned that the object of her curiosity was Lady Blessing and Saehad Itv d, like other people, in the delusion that the Countess of Blessington was the loveliest of her sex, and saw — a fat, painted, turbaned old woman. For nearly twenty years Lady Blessington was a noticeable woman in London life — Men of all ranks in society, provided they had talent and popularity, were to be met with in her house; their wives, daughters and sisters did not visit her, Basques she entered fashionable life with a doubtful character, which did not improve
enty years Lady Blessington was a noticeable woman in London life — Men of all ranks in society, provided they had talent and popularity, were to be met with in her house; their wives, daughters and sisters did not visit her, Basques she entered fashionable life with a doubtful character, which did not improve as she grew older He sale visitors corresponded freely with her, and she was load of writing to them — fancying, because she wrote well turned sen fancying, that she was a second Madame De Sevigne. Claudine Misart a beautiful French girl, a dress maker in Rome, received an anonymous letter recently, heating at an important mission which would he entrusted to her. She very properly did not answer. A second letter urged her to declare her intentions, negatively by a yellow ribbon worn upon her person; of affirmatively, by a blue ribbon. She displayed yellow the first time she took at walk and was struck at twice with a poignant by an assassin wearing the dress of a Fre
Joseph C. Spalding (search for this): article news
is is a beautiful rosebud, nearly ready to open its if to our gaze. On the other side is a ill another stem, but unmistakably a legitimate shoot of the parent cherry tree — the leaves bearing but slight resemblance to those on the other sums referred in. A good liquid Club --We gave in our last issue a mode of making a liquid glue, and we now off. another which was discover, and has been well tested and approved in this city, and is in all respects equal to, if not identical with, Spalding's. Dissolve good common glue in vinegar, in about equal portions, or, it is not desired to make it thin, three parts of glue to two of vinegar, and when thoroughly dissolved bottle and cork for use. If immediate use is needed let the vinegar be warm, when the solution will be complete in a few minutes. In all cases the vinegar should be of good strength and sharpness, and a few experiments will enable any reader to determine the exact proportion.--Charleston Courier. A Mobile book-cop
rallying an avenge host. Rain nobly courting; danger'spost, They on ward mach to victory. In such clear front and fearless read, Read, suns whose a re for freedom bled, No no pert fled; Aid doubt not their ability. To firmly meet the battle's shock, and stand though the green hill should rook, When rouling land he non mock Heaven's thundering artillery. That ning memory of worng. slander, will make strong There and which drives the steel along Hurling, the foe to infamy. Ruther than this proud Southern land Five Maya keep tyrant's hand, Crawl his vine, marauding band Claim coming nationally, They'll fight till the last man shall fall Behold the last fort's ruined wall, Than yield their birthright, liberty! Haven county, Va July 1861 A osen Famous Ba --Her Eccentricities An Eastern editor observes: Lady Blessington is better known in this country than almost any other woman of title in the old country. She died at Paris, at the somewhat matur
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