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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 22, 1861.., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
wrongs escape capture. They admit of no retaliation. The humanity of our people would shrink instinctively from the bare idea of waging a like war upon the sick, the women and the children of the enemy. But there are other savage practices which have been resorted to by the Government of the United States, which do admit of repression by retaliation. I have been driven to the necessity of enforcing this repression. The prisoners of war taken by the enemy on board the armed schooner Savannah, sailing under our commission, were, as I was credibly advised, treated like common felons; put in irons, confined in a jail usually appropriated to criminals of the first dye, and threatened with punishment as such. I had made an application for the exchange of these prisoners, to the commanding officer of the enemy's squadron off Charleston harbor, but that officer had already sent the prisoners to New York when the application was made. I therefore deemed it my duty to renew the propos
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
rule; private residences, in peaceful rural retreats, are bombarded and burnt; grain crops in the field are consumed by the torch; and when the torch is not convenient, careful labor is bestowed to render complete the destruction of every article of use or ornament remaining in private dwellings, after their inhabitants have fled from the outrages of a brutal soldiery. In 1781, Great Britain, when invading her revolted Colonies, took possession of the very district of country near Fortress Monroe now occupied by troops of the United States.--The houses then inhabited by the people, after being respected and protected by avowed invaders, are now pillaged and destroyed by men who pretend that the victims are their fellow citizens. Mankind will shudder to hear the tales of outrages committed on defenceless females by soldiers of the United States now invading our homes, yet these outrages are prompted by inflamed passions and the madness of intoxication. But who shall depict
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 1
of free, equal and sovereign States. Our loved and honored brethren of North Carolina and Tennessee have consummated the action, foreseen and provided for at your last session, and I have had the gratification of announcing, by proclamation, in conformity with law, that those States were admitted into the Confederacy. The people of Virginia, also, by a majority previously unknown in her history, have ratified the action of her Convention, uniting her fortunes with ours. The States of Arkansas, North Carolina and Virginia have likewise adopted the permanent Constitution of the Confederate States, and no doubt is entertained of its adoption by Tennessee at the election to be held early next month. I deemed it advisable to direct the removal of the several Executive Departments, with their archives, to this city, to which you had removed the seat of Government, immediately after your adjournment. The aggression movements of the enemy required prompt and energetic action. The
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
on in an executive message. Fortunately for the truth of history, however, the President of the United States details with minuteness the attempt to reinforce Fort Pickens, in violation of an armistices of which he confesses to have been informed, but "only by rumors too vague and uncertain to fix attention;" the hostile expedition dispatched to supply Fort Sumter, admitted to have been undertaken with a knowledge that its success was impossible; the sending of notice to the Governor of South Carolina of his intention to use force to accomplish his object, and then quoting from his Inaugural Address the assurance that there could be no conflict, unless these States were the aggressors, he proceeds to declare that his cousin, as just related by himself, was a performance of this promise, "so free from the power of ingenious sophistry as that the world should not be able to misunderstand and in defiance of his own statement that regard notice of the approach of a hostile fleet, he char
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
taliation. I have been driven to the necessity of enforcing this repression. The prisoners of war taken by the enemy on board the armed schooner Savannah, sailing under our commission, were, as I was credibly advised, treated like common felons; put in irons, confined in a jail usually appropriated to criminals of the first dye, and threatened with punishment as such. I had made an application for the exchange of these prisoners, to the commanding officer of the enemy's squadron off Charleston harbor, but that officer had already sent the prisoners to New York when the application was made. I therefore deemed it my duty to renew the proposal for the exchange to the constitutional Commander in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, the only officer having control of the prisoners. To this end I dispatched an officer to him, under a flag of truce; and in making the proposal of informed President Lincoln of my resolute purpose to check all barbarities on prisoners of war,
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 1
e of the United States. The series of manÅ’avres by which this impression was created, the art with which they were devised, and the perfidy with which they were executed, were already known to you, but you could scarcely have supposed that they would be openly avowed, and their success made the subject of boast and self-laudation in an executive message. Fortunately for the truth of history, however, the President of the United States details with minuteness the attempt to reinforce Fort Pickens, in violation of an armistices of which he confesses to have been informed, but "only by rumors too vague and uncertain to fix attention;" the hostile expedition dispatched to supply Fort Sumter, admitted to have been undertaken with a knowledge that its success was impossible; the sending of notice to the Governor of South Carolina of his intention to use force to accomplish his object, and then quoting from his Inaugural Address the assurance that there could be no conflict, unless thes
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
the recess, and to matters connected with the public defence. I have again to congratulate you on the accession of new members to our Confederation of free, equal and sovereign States. Our loved and honored brethren of North Carolina and Tennessee have consummated the action, foreseen and provided for at your last session, and I have had the gratification of announcing, by proclamation, in conformity with law, that those States were admitted into the Confederacy. The people of Virgitified the action of her Convention, uniting her fortunes with ours. The States of Arkansas, North Carolina and Virginia have likewise adopted the permanent Constitution of the Confederate States, and no doubt is entertained of its adoption by Tennessee at the election to be held early next month. I deemed it advisable to direct the removal of the several Executive Departments, with their archives, to this city, to which you had removed the seat of Government, immediately after your adjou
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 1
inate war upon them all, with a savage ferocity unknown to modern civilization. In this war rapine is the rule; private residences, in peaceful rural retreats, are bombarded and burnt; grain crops in the field are consumed by the torch; and when the torch is not convenient, careful labor is bestowed to render complete the destruction of every article of use or ornament remaining in private dwellings, after their inhabitants have fled from the outrages of a brutal soldiery. In 1781, Great Britain, when invading her revolted Colonies, took possession of the very district of country near Fortress Monroe now occupied by troops of the United States.--The houses then inhabited by the people, after being respected and protected by avowed invaders, are now pillaged and destroyed by men who pretend that the victims are their fellow citizens. Mankind will shudder to hear the tales of outrages committed on defenceless females by soldiers of the United States now invading our homes, ye
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
dopted the permanent Constitution of the Confederate States, and no doubt is entertained of its adopnment is constituted, the President of the United States and his advisers succeeded in deceiving the subversion of those of the people of the United States. The series of manÅ’avres by which thiover of this unfounded pretence that the Confederate States are the assailants, that high functionartress Monroe now occupied by troops of the United States.--The houses then inhabited by the people, on defenceless females by soldiers of the United States now invading our homes, yet these outrages been resorted to by the Government of the United States, which do admit of repression by retaliatiander in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, the only officer having control of the prander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the report of the officer charged t the assertion. The President of the United States refuses to recognize in these, our late si[9 more...]
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
e occurred during the recess, and to matters connected with the public defence. I have again to congratulate you on the accession of new members to our Confederation of free, equal and sovereign States. Our loved and honored brethren of North Carolina and Tennessee have consummated the action, foreseen and provided for at your last session, and I have had the gratification of announcing, by proclamation, in conformity with law, that those States were admitted into the Confederacy. The people of Virginia, also, by a majority previously unknown in her history, have ratified the action of her Convention, uniting her fortunes with ours. The States of Arkansas, North Carolina and Virginia have likewise adopted the permanent Constitution of the Confederate States, and no doubt is entertained of its adoption by Tennessee at the election to be held early next month. I deemed it advisable to direct the removal of the several Executive Departments, with their archives, to this c
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