hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 42 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 18 0 Browse Search
July 22nd 12 12 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Washington 10 0 Browse Search
House 10 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 10 0 Browse Search
B. F. Smith 10 0 Browse Search
John T. Scott 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 10 total hits in 4 results.

Lowndes (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 14
The crops below. --Our visit to Pensacola gave us a passing view of many of the plantations on the line of the railroad, and although we were prepared to see extraordinary crops of corn, we had no idea that it ever grew to such height as we now behold in this and the county of Lowndes. It seemed that the stalks were 25 to 30 feet high. The care were going too fast to enable us to see the average number of cars to the stalk, but the yield must be great. Lower down, in the counties of Butler and Conecuh, corn had not grown so tall, but upon many of the plantations cotton seemed to be as forward and as thrifty as in Montgomery and Lowndes. But cotton in all the counties through which we passed in daylight was not as forward by three weeks as we think would average with previous years upon the same qualities of lands. And there seemed to be nearly twice as much land planted in corn as in cotton.--This statement tallies with the answers we received from inquiries.--Montgomery Ma
Conecuh County (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 14
crops below. --Our visit to Pensacola gave us a passing view of many of the plantations on the line of the railroad, and although we were prepared to see extraordinary crops of corn, we had no idea that it ever grew to such height as we now behold in this and the county of Lowndes. It seemed that the stalks were 25 to 30 feet high. The care were going too fast to enable us to see the average number of cars to the stalk, but the yield must be great. Lower down, in the counties of Butler and Conecuh, corn had not grown so tall, but upon many of the plantations cotton seemed to be as forward and as thrifty as in Montgomery and Lowndes. But cotton in all the counties through which we passed in daylight was not as forward by three weeks as we think would average with previous years upon the same qualities of lands. And there seemed to be nearly twice as much land planted in corn as in cotton.--This statement tallies with the answers we received from inquiries.--Montgomery Mail.
Butler County (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 14
The crops below. --Our visit to Pensacola gave us a passing view of many of the plantations on the line of the railroad, and although we were prepared to see extraordinary crops of corn, we had no idea that it ever grew to such height as we now behold in this and the county of Lowndes. It seemed that the stalks were 25 to 30 feet high. The care were going too fast to enable us to see the average number of cars to the stalk, but the yield must be great. Lower down, in the counties of Butler and Conecuh, corn had not grown so tall, but upon many of the plantations cotton seemed to be as forward and as thrifty as in Montgomery and Lowndes. But cotton in all the counties through which we passed in daylight was not as forward by three weeks as we think would average with previous years upon the same qualities of lands. And there seemed to be nearly twice as much land planted in corn as in cotton.--This statement tallies with the answers we received from inquiries.--Montgomery Mai
crops below. --Our visit to Pensacola gave us a passing view of many of the plantations on the line of the railroad, and although we were prepared to see extraordinary crops of corn, we had no idea that it ever grew to such height as we now behold in this and the county of Lowndes. It seemed that the stalks were 25 to 30 feet high. The care were going too fast to enable us to see the average number of cars to the stalk, but the yield must be great. Lower down, in the counties of Butler and Conecuh, corn had not grown so tall, but upon many of the plantations cotton seemed to be as forward and as thrifty as in Montgomery and Lowndes. But cotton in all the counties through which we passed in daylight was not as forward by three weeks as we think would average with previous years upon the same qualities of lands. And there seemed to be nearly twice as much land planted in corn as in cotton.--This statement tallies with the answers we received from inquiries.--Montgomery Mail.