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upon his beardless cheek, rush gaily by to the scene of strife and blood, and hot tears rush to eyes unused to weep at the thought of that fair head pillowed on the bloody turf; and yet, where could mortal die as well? Pity the desolate ones at home; but for him, the death that must have come at last and tom him reluctant from the earth, he has gone bravely forth to meet, and in the virtue and valor of self- sacrifice, has robbed it of its sting and despoiled the grave of its victory. When Wolfe, on being told that the French retreated, exclaimed, "I die happy," he expressed, no doubt, the feelings of every true hero as he looks his last upon the earth and feels that he has not died in vain. Happy in being a benefactor, at the cost of his own life, to his native land and to humanity; happy in knowing that he will be remembered with love and gratitude, and that he himself will be permitted to look down and see how from his blood will spring the life-giving plants of freedom, indepen
at in which he lays down his life in a good cause. Death is the common lot of all, and in one shape or other must overtake every man; but he who goes forth to meet it for the benefit of humanity, may well be said to die more gloriously than did Socrates, for "Socrates died like a philosopher," but this man "like a God." Nobler life can no man live than he who walks in the footsteps of the incarnate Son of Deity, nor a more godlike death than to perish, in humble imitation of Him, for the good oSocrates died like a philosopher," but this man "like a God." Nobler life can no man live than he who walks in the footsteps of the incarnate Son of Deity, nor a more godlike death than to perish, in humble imitation of Him, for the good of the human race. Thus the Martyrs and Confessors of all ages, who have passed through great tribulations and at last sealed their holy faith with their blood, are most honored in the Christian church of all the earthly representatives of its crucified and risen Lord, the Divine Martyr of Calvary. And surely, next to them, in disinterestedness, self-sacrifice and heroism, we may place the glorious men who die for their country. But it is wrong to say that such men die. Bullets and bayonet