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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 27, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Stone Bridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
The Maryland Regiment in the battle at Stone Bridge. The Maryland Regiment, in company with the Tennesseans, marched from Winchester on Sunday morning--32 miles--and arrived at the scene of the battle very much fatigued. --Upon their arrival at the Junction, at 12 o'clock, they threw aside their knapsacks and marched at double-quick to the scene of action, where they were exposed to a heavy fire. They were at once drawn up in line of battle to repel an attempt to turn General Johnston's left wing. This they did most gallantly by several well directed volleys and a charge. The result is known. The enemy retreated in confusion, throwing away everything which might impede their flight. Undoubtedly the timely arrival and noble conduct of the Maryland Regiment contributed materially to the successful issue of the battle. Many personal acts of bravery were exhibited, but all performed their duty well.-- Col. Elzey, who commanded, was promoted upon the field, and highly compliment
r arrival at the Junction, at 12 o'clock, they threw aside their knapsacks and marched at double-quick to the scene of action, where they were exposed to a heavy fire. They were at once drawn up in line of battle to repel an attempt to turn General Johnston's left wing. This they did most gallantly by several well directed volleys and a charge. The result is known. The enemy retreated in confusion, throwing away everything which might impede their flight. Undoubtedly the timely arrival and ell.-- Col. Elzey, who commanded, was promoted upon the field, and highly complimented for his coolness and bravery. The loss of the regiment, fortunately, was not heavy. In connection with the above, we cannot forbear mentioning the bravery of Col. Thomas, who acted as Aid to Gen. Johnston. At one period of the battle many of the regiments were broken and scattered, when he gathered them together and let them on to the charge. It was at this time that he was shot and instantly killed.
e at once drawn up in line of battle to repel an attempt to turn General Johnston's left wing. This they did most gallantly by several well directed volleys and a charge. The result is known. The enemy retreated in confusion, throwing away everything which might impede their flight. Undoubtedly the timely arrival and noble conduct of the Maryland Regiment contributed materially to the successful issue of the battle. Many personal acts of bravery were exhibited, but all performed their duty well.-- Col. Elzey, who commanded, was promoted upon the field, and highly complimented for his coolness and bravery. The loss of the regiment, fortunately, was not heavy. In connection with the above, we cannot forbear mentioning the bravery of Col. Thomas, who acted as Aid to Gen. Johnston. At one period of the battle many of the regiments were broken and scattered, when he gathered them together and let them on to the charge. It was at this time that he was shot and instantly killed.
Francis J. Thomas (search for this): article 10
at once drawn up in line of battle to repel an attempt to turn General Johnston's left wing. This they did most gallantly by several well directed volleys and a charge. The result is known. The enemy retreated in confusion, throwing away everything which might impede their flight. Undoubtedly the timely arrival and noble conduct of the Maryland Regiment contributed materially to the successful issue of the battle. Many personal acts of bravery were exhibited, but all performed their duty well.-- Col. Elzey, who commanded, was promoted upon the field, and highly complimented for his coolness and bravery. The loss of the regiment, fortunately, was not heavy. In connection with the above, we cannot forbear mentioning the bravery of Col. Thomas, who acted as Aid to Gen. Johnston. At one period of the battle many of the regiments were broken and scattered, when he gathered them together and let them on to the charge. It was at this time that he was shot and instantly killed.