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Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 5
es them the battle grounds by necessary consequence. We are placed in the front ranks; we occupy the out posts. If these are taken it cannot be expected the citadel will long hold out. Hence, I have everywhere, from the time I entered the State of Arkansas until I reached this place, invoked my fellow-citizens to rally to the rescue; if they did not want to see their own homes in flames, their own firesides desolated, they must march forthwith, either to Virginia or Missouri, meet the invaderanhood, and combine within himself all that is excellent in human character, I know not the model I would sooner take than the gallant, noble, brave McCulloch. [Cheers.] With eight thousand men he came to our assistance, with troops from Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana. One regiment from this latter State was the first and best I ever saw. They came all the way on foot, they came to fight and not to retreat. In addition to this force he brought to my aid his high military genius, his resistless
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 5
low citizens of Virginia, to see it published in your papers that that gallant officer and myself had a difficulty after the battle. My friends, if I had the power, and desired to make a man who should stand as the representative of manhood, and combine within himself all that is excellent in human character, I know not the model I would sooner take than the gallant, noble, brave McCulloch. [Cheers.] With eight thousand men he came to our assistance, with troops from Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana. One regiment from this latter State was the first and best I ever saw. They came all the way on foot, they came to fight and not to retreat. In addition to this force he brought to my aid his high military genius, his resistless energy and brave and fearless heart. [Cheers] Gen Polk has ordered to my assistance thirteen thousand men, and they are now on their way to the battlefield [Cheers] I shall return as soon as the cars can take me to the State of Missouri. I shall go to the
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 5
Speech of Gov. Jackson, of Missouri. On Thursday evening last a large crowd assembled in fronto hear from his lips an account of affairs in Missouri. In response to loud and repeated calls for I doubt not you want to hear something of Missouri. [Voices "Yes; tell us about her? "] The trod here, the difficulties you have surmounted, Missouri has felt and encountered to a far greater extent. The people of Missouri are more divided than the people of Virginia. The insidious influencesof the geographical situation of Virginia and Missouri, it is apparent to the mind of all that these you desire to hear something specially about Missouri. Well, we have had some little skirmishing tughter and cheers] It was done exclusively by Missouri troops. Another battle we had a day or tn as soon as the cars can take me to the State of Missouri. I shall go to the field, and there I slow is the one we should make in Virginia and Missouri, and drive the invader from our soil. I advi[3 more...]
Dutch (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
e a stand. On the 5th of July the enemy appeared, numbering twenty-five hundred men, under command of Col Siegel. We routed them, drove them fourteen miles, and from every position they took, and the last we heard of them they were still running [Laughter and cheers] It was done exclusively by Missouri troops. Another battle we had a day or two afterwards, and I think it is the greatest fight of the war, although upon a small scale. Col. Cook had raised a regiment of 800 men, mostly Dutch. These he quartered in two large barns. Two of my Captains, Hall and Stone, with their companies, consisting of 180 men, went to these barns before daylight and slaughtered the enemy like hogs, killing 230 of them, putting the rest to flight, and getting every gun the scamps had. [Cheers] There has been some little skirmishing on the north side of the Missouri River, of which, however, I can give no account, having seen nothing but telegraphic reports from that region. The day after the 5
y-five hundred men, under command of Col Siegel. We routed them, drove them fourteen miles, and from every position they took, and the last we heard of them they were still running [Laughter and cheers] It was done exclusively by Missouri troops. Another battle we had a day or two afterwards, and I think it is the greatest fight of the war, although upon a small scale. Col. Cook had raised a regiment of 800 men, mostly Dutch. These he quartered in two large barns. Two of my Captains, Hall and Stone, with their companies, consisting of 180 men, went to these barns before daylight and slaughtered the enemy like hogs, killing 230 of them, putting the rest to flight, and getting every gun the scamps had. [Cheers] There has been some little skirmishing on the north side of the Missouri River, of which, however, I can give no account, having seen nothing but telegraphic reports from that region. The day after the 5th of July battle, I was met by the gallant McCulloch —— Ben McCullo
them. At length I had a sufficient force to make a stand. On the 5th of July the enemy appeared, numbering twenty-five hundred men, under command of Col Siegel. We routed them, drove them fourteen miles, and from every position they took, and the last we heard of them they were still running [Laughter and cheers] It was done exclusively by Missouri troops. Another battle we had a day or two afterwards, and I think it is the greatest fight of the war, although upon a small scale. Col. Cook had raised a regiment of 800 men, mostly Dutch. These he quartered in two large barns. Two of my Captains, Hall and Stone, with their companies, consisting of 180 men, went to these barns before daylight and slaughtered the enemy like hogs, killing 230 of them, putting the rest to flight, and getting every gun the scamps had. [Cheers] There has been some little skirmishing on the north side of the Missouri River, of which, however, I can give no account, having seen nothing but telegraph
Eugene Davis (search for this): article 5
soil, or we are conquered. [Cheers.] I do not expect the latter to take place, Such men as we have can never be conquered, [cheers.] because they are fighting for that which is dearer than life itself — their rights [Cheers.] I have left behind me wife, children, home, everything that is dear to man. My men are in the same condition.--We would be worse than cowards if we gave up the contest with anything less than life. [Loud cheers.] In the great battle lately fought — the battle of Davis, Beauregard and Johnston — our men exhibited a foretaste of what Lincoln's menials may expect in every contest that is to follow. Any set of raw troops who can, with nothing but bowie knives, charge upon the bayonets of regulars, as our men did in the late battle, can never be whipped. There is no instance upon record where raw recruits were known to make such bold, daring, slashing charges right up to the mouths of cannon, manned by veterans, and take them, as did our men on that occasion<
Beauregard (search for this): article 5
we are conquered. [Cheers.] I do not expect the latter to take place, Such men as we have can never be conquered, [cheers.] because they are fighting for that which is dearer than life itself — their rights [Cheers.] I have left behind me wife, children, home, everything that is dear to man. My men are in the same condition.--We would be worse than cowards if we gave up the contest with anything less than life. [Loud cheers.] In the great battle lately fought — the battle of Davis, Beauregard and Johnston — our men exhibited a foretaste of what Lincoln's menials may expect in every contest that is to follow. Any set of raw troops who can, with nothing but bowie knives, charge upon the bayonets of regulars, as our men did in the late battle, can never be whipped. There is no instance upon record where raw recruits were known to make such bold, daring, slashing charges right up to the mouths of cannon, manned by veterans, and take them, as did our men on that occasion. Nor was<
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 5
l situation of Virginia and Missouri, it is apparent to the mind of all that these States must be the great battle-fields upon which this war is to be waged, if Mr. Lincoln shall think proper to continue it. I had hoped, however, and I still have some hope, that after the terrible defeat and dreadful slaughter which his minions metack them, with such interests at stake, with such courage to nerve their arms and such principles to inspire their hearts, ever were conquered. And all who, like Lincoln, attempt the hazard us experiment, will learn from the book of bloody disaster that they never can be conquered [Continued cheering, and cries of "Never!" "never!hing less than life. [Loud cheers.] In the great battle lately fought — the battle of Davis, Beauregard and Johnston — our men exhibited a foretaste of what Lincoln's menials may expect in every contest that is to follow. Any set of raw troops who can, with nothing but bowie knives, charge upon the bayonets of regulars, as o
dred men, under command of Col Siegel. We routed them, drove them fourteen miles, and from every position they took, and the last we heard of them they were still running [Laughter and cheers] It was done exclusively by Missouri troops. Another battle we had a day or two afterwards, and I think it is the greatest fight of the war, although upon a small scale. Col. Cook had raised a regiment of 800 men, mostly Dutch. These he quartered in two large barns. Two of my Captains, Hall and Stone, with their companies, consisting of 180 men, went to these barns before daylight and slaughtered the enemy like hogs, killing 230 of them, putting the rest to flight, and getting every gun the scamps had. [Cheers] There has been some little skirmishing on the north side of the Missouri River, of which, however, I can give no account, having seen nothing but telegraphic reports from that region. The day after the 5th of July battle, I was met by the gallant McCulloch —— Ben McCulloch — you <
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