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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 5, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 11
can, under usual circumstances, be offered in market. On the Deep River are found all the elements necessary, and in close juxtaposition.--The resources of the present apparatus at the Tysor Mine are adequate to the production of about six tons a week. The coal is picked up from the bottom of the Egypt shaft and is a very pure, bituminous coal, excellent for furnace or gas-making purposes, and we learn that it will shortly be furnished to our people at rates that will leave nothing to regret on account of the want of Pennsylvania anthracite. The coal first sent to market, will, we presume, come principally from the Egypt Mine, under the superintendence of Mr. McLean. Several experiments have been made in the way of manufacturing kerosine oil, and after several failures, we believe that the practicability of the enterprise has been demonstrated Mr. Paton hopes to be able to turn out a supply of good oil for burning purposes by the fall.--Wilmington (N. C.) Journal.
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 11
can, under usual circumstances, be offered in market. On the Deep River are found all the elements necessary, and in close juxtaposition.--The resources of the present apparatus at the Tysor Mine are adequate to the production of about six tons a week. The coal is picked up from the bottom of the Egypt shaft and is a very pure, bituminous coal, excellent for furnace or gas-making purposes, and we learn that it will shortly be furnished to our people at rates that will leave nothing to regret on account of the want of Pennsylvania anthracite. The coal first sent to market, will, we presume, come principally from the Egypt Mine, under the superintendence of Mr. McLean. Several experiments have been made in the way of manufacturing kerosine oil, and after several failures, we believe that the practicability of the enterprise has been demonstrated Mr. Paton hopes to be able to turn out a supply of good oil for burning purposes by the fall.--Wilmington (N. C.) Journal.
can, under usual circumstances, be offered in market. On the Deep River are found all the elements necessary, and in close juxtaposition.--The resources of the present apparatus at the Tysor Mine are adequate to the production of about six tons a week. The coal is picked up from the bottom of the Egypt shaft and is a very pure, bituminous coal, excellent for furnace or gas-making purposes, and we learn that it will shortly be furnished to our people at rates that will leave nothing to regret on account of the want of Pennsylvania anthracite. The coal first sent to market, will, we presume, come principally from the Egypt Mine, under the superintendence of Mr. McLean. Several experiments have been made in the way of manufacturing kerosine oil, and after several failures, we believe that the practicability of the enterprise has been demonstrated Mr. Paton hopes to be able to turn out a supply of good oil for burning purposes by the fall.--Wilmington (N. C.) Journal.
an, under usual circumstances, be offered in market. On the Deep River are found all the elements necessary, and in close juxtaposition.--The resources of the present apparatus at the Tysor Mine are adequate to the production of about six tons a week. The coal is picked up from the bottom of the Egypt shaft and is a very pure, bituminous coal, excellent for furnace or gas-making purposes, and we learn that it will shortly be furnished to our people at rates that will leave nothing to regret on account of the want of Pennsylvania anthracite. The coal first sent to market, will, we presume, come principally from the Egypt Mine, under the superintendence of Mr. McLean. Several experiments have been made in the way of manufacturing kerosine oil, and after several failures, we believe that the practicability of the enterprise has been demonstrated Mr. Paton hopes to be able to turn out a supply of good oil for burning purposes by the fall.--Wilmington (N. C.) Journal.
John Colvin (search for this): article 11
Deep River iron and Coal --Mr. John Colvin, just down from Deep River, has shown us some specimens of wrought iron produced from the ores of the Tysor Mine, and made on the spot under his superintendence. The iron is of the finest quality, and the experiment has satisfied Mr. Colvin, himself a practical iron manufacturer, that it is, commercially speaking, practicable to make iron on Deep River fully equal to the best imported brand. By commercially, is meant, at rates equally reasonablMr. Colvin, himself a practical iron manufacturer, that it is, commercially speaking, practicable to make iron on Deep River fully equal to the best imported brand. By commercially, is meant, at rates equally reasonable if not more so than other iron of similar quality can, under usual circumstances, be offered in market. On the Deep River are found all the elements necessary, and in close juxtaposition.--The resources of the present apparatus at the Tysor Mine are adequate to the production of about six tons a week. The coal is picked up from the bottom of the Egypt shaft and is a very pure, bituminous coal, excellent for furnace or gas-making purposes, and we learn that it will shortly be furnishe