hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
G. T. Beauregard 32 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 28 0 Browse Search
March, 8 AD 20 20 Browse Search
Lincoln 20 2 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 18 0 Browse Search
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Benjamin McCulloch 13 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 5, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 166 total hits in 104 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Bentonville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
speaking. Though no mention is made in relation to the number of forces engaged on either side, we have other means of ascertaining. The command of Lyon and Siegel, (the latter of whom has recently gone to Jefferson City,) according to the estimate of the St. Louis papers, did not exceed 12,000 men, nearly all of whom were Germans. Gen. McCulloch, as we learn from a gentleman who arrived from his camp a few days since, had 8,000 men under him, encamped in Northwestern Arkansas, at Bentonville, which is only a few miles from the Missouri State line. Gen. Pearce was encamped only a few miles west of him with a force of 10,000, which may have joined McCulloch's column, and participated in the attack. We shall await further intelligence regarding this rumor with great interest. Miscellaneous. A correspondent of a Yankee paper, writing home from the defeat of Manassas, had actually spirit enough left to indulge in a grim and dismal joke at the expense of William How
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 3
make a good company. You will require several dozen handcuffs, for prisoners taken in battle, if not your own folks, and you had better procure them now. Yours, in haste, John L. Hodsden. Adjutant General. The reported victory in Missouri. The Memphis Appeal of the 31st ult., says: We have received a letter from a special correspondent, dated the afternoon of the 29th inst., from a point up the river, which we do not deem it either prudent or necessary to mention; stating that General Pillow had just received an express from Gen. Jeff. Thompson, of Missouri, announcing that General Ben. McCulloch had on Wednesday last made an attack on Springfield, and achieved a brilliant victory over the Federal forces, who were strongly fortified at that place under Gen. Lyon. It was represented as a hard fight, and the loss reported at 600 from McCulloch's command, against 900 of the enemy, with many Federal prisoners taken. The further statement is made, that after their
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
McCulloch's column, and participated in the attack. We shall await further intelligence regarding this rumor with great interest. Miscellaneous. A correspondent of a Yankee paper, writing home from the defeat of Manassas, had actually spirit enough left to indulge in a grim and dismal joke at the expense of William Howard Russell, L. L. D., whom he saw scampering from the battle field as fast as his horse would carry him. He said he could account for the name of the place--"'Bull's Run, ' John Bull's! Russell showed good horsemanship." Captain Doubleday was, it seems, in charge of General Scott's favorite pocket pistol, his famous Parrot gun. The gun is taken!--Where (asks the Wilmington Journal) is the invincible Doubleday? Won't he write some more braggadocio letters to his Yankee friends? Ye glorious Capita-ing Doubuelday, Who writes all night and fights all day. In one of the Massachusetts regiments there are or were 336 shoemakers, of whom 87 belonge
Waterford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
ing theme for the troubadours of old to chant. A Southern Lady. Eighth Virginia Regiment. This regiment (Col. Hunton) behaved gallantly in the great battle, and received the highest encomiums of the commanding General. The following list of killed and wounded we copy from the London Mirror. Border Guard--Townsend Hope, shot through the stomach; died twelve o'clock at night, buried at six in the evening. Lieut John R. White, confusion of the hip; Charles W. Brown, of Waterford, shot in the right thigh; Harrison Browner, shot through the shoulder-blades severely; James Alder two wounds, one through the shoulder and the other in the thigh; Enoch Cantwell, shot through the shoulder, badly; James W. Russell, slight fresh wound; R. Graham, shot through the right arm; Thos. Leman, shot through the shoulder, badly; Tazewell McAtee, shot through the elbow, shattered; James McDaniel, shot through cheek bone; Wm. Galloway, through the thigh, flesh wound; Wm. Mull, shot th
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 3
ed at the time he was speaking. Though no mention is made in relation to the number of forces engaged on either side, we have other means of ascertaining. The command of Lyon and Siegel, (the latter of whom has recently gone to Jefferson City,) according to the estimate of the St. Louis papers, did not exceed 12,000 men, nearly all of whom were Germans. Gen. McCulloch, as we learn from a gentleman who arrived from his camp a few days since, had 8,000 men under him, encamped in Northwestern Arkansas, at Bentonville, which is only a few miles from the Missouri State line. Gen. Pearce was encamped only a few miles west of him with a force of 10,000, which may have joined McCulloch's column, and participated in the attack. We shall await further intelligence regarding this rumor with great interest. Miscellaneous. A correspondent of a Yankee paper, writing home from the defeat of Manassas, had actually spirit enough left to indulge in a grim and dismal joke at the e
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 3
The county of Caroline will not have to bring her militia into the field, her quotes of volunteers being much larger than the requisition of the Governor called for in his proclamation of the 20th. This is a noble county — practising exactly what it preaches. It voted for separation, and now it shows a thorough willingness to back its voting by any amount of fighting that may be necessary. Those handcuffs. The Fredericksburg Recorder has received the following. It is dated "State of Maine, Headquarters Adj't General's Office, June 20, 1861: Col. Duffell My Dear Sir: Herewith you have an announcement to Brady, that he will not be commissioned. My course would be to take measures to have his full company present, paraded, without arms, and have the letter read to him and the company by the Adjutant. Have previously, sufficient and reliable guard, with loaded muskets, and if any demonstrations of desertion are made, shoot them as you would pigeons. Don't
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 3
hern regiments. They weren't scared, they were thrashed. "Masked batteries," like the cry of "Bluebeard," to bad children, are the terror of the Northern people. The term is used so often in their fanciful stories of pretended victories, that it has become ridiculous. They should call a pocket revolver a masked battery. The Suffolk (Va.) Continentals and Marion Rangers whose term of enlistment expired on Saturday last, have re-inlisted for nine months more. The following is from the Bull Run correspondent of the Mississippian: While Joe, a servant of Erskine Watkins, was cooking a chicken in a kitchen near the hospital, a ball passed near him and struck his skillet. In his report he said, "Bless God! Massa, I never saw de chicken after dat." James Camp Turner, of Huntsville, Ala.' (son of Capt. Daniel B. Turner and grandson of Major Robert Searcy, deceased, one of Gen. Jackson's Aids in the Creek war,) was shot through the heart at Manassas on the 21st ult.
Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
ks, of Maryland. The others wounded were James Baker, of Middleburg, dangerously; L. P. Wilson, wounded, (taken prisoner and regained by the taking of fifteen Federal prisoners;) Grubb, Thos. Shamlin, Mr. Moore of Leesburg, Jos. Thomas, (not dangerously wounded,) Bird Carter. Missing — Willie Wilson, of Martins burg, horse killed, and supposed to be taken prisoner. The remnant of this brave little band are doing the duty equal to a whole company, within a few miles of the enemy below Fairfax. They had to be reinforced in horses, as six, besides those mentioned, were killed. I must close, though the bravery of all the Southern soldiers is a fitting theme for the troubadours of old to chant. A Southern Lady. Eighth Virginia Regiment. This regiment (Col. Hunton) behaved gallantly in the great battle, and received the highest encomiums of the commanding General. The following list of killed and wounded we copy from the London Mirror. Border Guard--Townsend Hope
Middleburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
shreds from their balls. He remounted in a few moments. The others killed were Stephen Cornell, (leaves a wife [poor] and ten children,) J. H. Plaster, C. F. Dowell. Lang, and John Hicks, of Maryland. The others wounded were James Baker, of Middleburg, dangerously; L. P. Wilson, wounded, (taken prisoner and regained by the taking of fifteen Federal prisoners;) Grubb, Thos. Shamlin, Mr. Moore of Leesburg, Jos. Thomas, (not dangerously wounded,) Bird Carter. Missing — Willie Wilson, of Martin. Kinney, Joseph B. Luntsford, Wm. E. Ball, Wm. Hewett.--Wounded seriously--Corporal Benj. Hurst and private Bernard King; slightly, John Shanny and Capt. Bazell, of Md. Camp Rifles, Capt. Wm. Berkeley.--Only one wounded, private Baker, of Middleburg, dangerous. Capt. W. Carter's Cavalry--Killed — Frank Dowell, Enoch McCarty, G. Francis, John Plaster, Stephen Cornell, Peyton Wilson, and a Mr. Hicks, of Md. Capt. Rogers' Artillery.--Wounded — John Howser, Since dead. Wampler's<
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
incoln's army deny the "soft impeachment" of panic. They say they did not yield to panic, but to the "irrepressible conflict" waged upon them by the Southern regiments. They weren't scared, they were thrashed. "Masked batteries," like the cry of "Bluebeard," to bad children, are the terror of the Northern people. The term is used so often in their fanciful stories of pretended victories, that it has become ridiculous. They should call a pocket revolver a masked battery. The Suffolk (Va.) Continentals and Marion Rangers whose term of enlistment expired on Saturday last, have re-inlisted for nine months more. The following is from the Bull Run correspondent of the Mississippian: While Joe, a servant of Erskine Watkins, was cooking a chicken in a kitchen near the hospital, a ball passed near him and struck his skillet. In his report he said, "Bless God! Massa, I never saw de chicken after dat." James Camp Turner, of Huntsville, Ala.' (son of Capt. Daniel B. Tur
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...