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United States (United States) (search for this): article 14
erals Johnston and Beauregard, and the troops under their command at the battle of Manassas, were introduced in Congress on yesterday, and adopted unanimously: Resolved, by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby cordially given, to General Joseph E Johnston and General Gustave T. Beauregard, and to the officers and troops under their command, for the great and signal victory obtained by them over forces of the United States far exceeding them in number, in the battle of the 21st of July, at Manassas, and for the gallantry, courage, and endurance evinced by them in a protracted and continuous struggle of more than ten hours--a victory, the results of which will be realized in the future successes of the war, and which, in the judgment of Congress, entitles all who contributed to it to the gratitude of their country. Resolved, further, That the foregoing resolution be made known in appropriate general or
Congress. The following resolutions of thanks to Generals Johnston and Beauregard, and the troops under their command at the battle of Manassas, were introduced in Congress on yesterday, and adopted unanimously: Resolved, by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby cordially given, to General Joseph E Johnston and General Gustave T. Beauregard, and to the officers and troops under their command, for the great andJohnston and General Gustave T. Beauregard, and to the officers and troops under their command, for the great and signal victory obtained by them over forces of the United States far exceeding them in number, in the battle of the 21st of July, at Manassas, and for the gallantry, courage, and endurance evinced by them in a protracted and continuous struggle of more than ten hours--a victory, the results of which will be realized in the future successes of the war, and which, in the judgment of Congress, entitles all who contributed to it to the gratitude of their country. Resolved, further, That the fo
Gustave T. Beauregard (search for this): article 14
Congress. The following resolutions of thanks to Generals Johnston and Beauregard, and the troops under their command at the battle of Manassas, were introduced in Congress on yesterday, and adopted unanimously: Resolved, by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby cordially given, to General Joseph E Johnston and General Gustave T. Beauregard, and to the officers and troops under their command, for the great and General Gustave T. Beauregard, and to the officers and troops under their command, for the great and signal victory obtained by them over forces of the United States far exceeding them in number, in the battle of the 21st of July, at Manassas, and for the gallantry, courage, and endurance evinced by them in a protracted and continuous struggle of more than ten hours--a victory, the results of which will be realized in the future successes of the war, and which, in the judgment of Congress, entitles all who contributed to it to the gratitude of their country. Resolved, further, That the fo
Congress. The following resolutions of thanks to Generals Johnston and Beauregard, and the troops under their command at the battle of Manassas, were introduced in Congress on yesterday, and adopted unanimously: Resolved, by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby cordially given, to General Joseph E Johnston and General Gustave T. Beauregard, and to the officers and troops under their command, for the great and signal victory obtained by them over forces of the United States far exceeding them in number, in the battle of the 21st of July, at Manassas, and for the gallantry, courage, and endurance evinced by them in a protracted and continuous struggle of more than ten hours--a victory, the results of which will be realized in the future successes of the war, and which, in the judgment of Congress, entitles all who contributed to it to the gratitude of their country. Resolved, further, That the for
at the battle of Manassas, were introduced in Congress on yesterday, and adopted unanimously: Resolved, by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby cordially given, to General Joseph E Johnston and General Gustave T. Beauregard, and to the officers and troops under their command, for the great and signal victory obtained by them over forces of the United States far exceeding them in number, in the battle of the 21st of July, at Manassas, and for the gallantry, courage, and endurance evinced by them in a protracted and continuous struggle of more than ten hours--a victory, the results of which will be realized in the future successes of the war, and which, in the judgment of Congress, entitles all who contributed to it to the gratitude of their country. Resolved, further, That the foregoing resolution be made known in appropriate general orders, by the Generals in command, to the officers and troops to w