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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 16
tes. The offence of the Governor was that he had openly conspired with armed enemies of the United States, and was using the militia and the treasure of the State in trying to withdraw Missouri fromhat they may come to the possession of the State without being captured by the troops of the United States. It is further enjoined on all citizens of a suitable age to enrol themselves in military o defence of the State." Gov. Gamble here takes the position that the Government of the United States is a sort of highway robber, marauding in Missouri, and watching for opportunities to plundert in defence of the State." So we at all have another State army, wholly independent of the United States authority, and educated by Gov. Gamble into the notion that the United States are to be watcUnited States are to be watched, lest they rob and plunder the State of Missouri. With such flattering commencement, what may we not expect from the new Governor — the Union Governor, par excellence--of Missouri? We take
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 16
The bogus Government in Missouri. The New York Times, one of the leading Abolition journals of at the proclamation of 'Governor' Gamble, of Missouri. We copy from that paper of August 7th: e treasure of the State in trying to withdraw Missouri from the Union. And further, that in the vioas, we might say, the most eminent citizen of Missouri. He was forty years a resident, notably conntes is a sort of highway robber, marauding in Missouri, and watching for opportunities to plunder tht to Gens. Fremont, Lyon and Pope, who are in Missouri to save Gamble & Co. from the wicked conspirae watched, lest they rob and plunder the State of Missouri. With such flattering commencement, wharnor — the Union Governor, par excellence--of Missouri? We take this occasion to renew to the Gt at Washington our warning of two days since Missouri is a prize of infinite value to the Confedera Louis is Missouri; and St. Louis is not safe Missouri has the iron, the lead, the saltpetre, t o he[3 more...]
ssion of the State without being captured by the troops of the United States. It is further enjoined on all citizens of a suitable age to enrol themselves in military organizations, that they may take part in the defence of the State." Gov. Gamble here takes the position that the Government of the United States is a sort of highway robber, marauding in Missouri, and watching for opportunities to plunder the State. A notable Union sentiment this, and a fine compliment to Gens. Fremont, Lyon and Pope, who are in Missouri to save Gamble & Co. from the wicked conspiracies of C. F. Jackson and his confederates Gov. Gamble exhorts his loyal Union constituents to become spies and informants, and to watch those rogues, the U. S. troops And he further urges his people to enrol them into military companies and be prepared "to take part in defence of the State." So we at all have another State army, wholly independent of the United States authority, and educated by Gov. Gamble into the n
Claiborne F. Jackson (search for this): article 16
enjoined on all citizens of a suitable age to enrol themselves in military organizations, that they may take part in the defence of the State." Gov. Gamble here takes the position that the Government of the United States is a sort of highway robber, marauding in Missouri, and watching for opportunities to plunder the State. A notable Union sentiment this, and a fine compliment to Gens. Fremont, Lyon and Pope, who are in Missouri to save Gamble & Co. from the wicked conspiracies of C. F. Jackson and his confederates Gov. Gamble exhorts his loyal Union constituents to become spies and informants, and to watch those rogues, the U. S. troops And he further urges his people to enrol them into military companies and be prepared "to take part in defence of the State." So we at all have another State army, wholly independent of the United States authority, and educated by Gov. Gamble into the notion that the United States are to be watched, lest they rob and plunder the State of Misso
the possession of the State without being captured by the troops of the United States. It is further enjoined on all citizens of a suitable age to enrol themselves in military organizations, that they may take part in the defence of the State." Gov. Gamble here takes the position that the Government of the United States is a sort of highway robber, marauding in Missouri, and watching for opportunities to plunder the State. A notable Union sentiment this, and a fine compliment to Gens. Fremont, Lyon and Pope, who are in Missouri to save Gamble & Co. from the wicked conspiracies of C. F. Jackson and his confederates Gov. Gamble exhorts his loyal Union constituents to become spies and informants, and to watch those rogues, the U. S. troops And he further urges his people to enrol them into military companies and be prepared "to take part in defence of the State." So we at all have another State army, wholly independent of the United States authority, and educated by Gov. Gamble
Andrew Jackson (search for this): article 16
th, is greatly chagrined at the proclamation of 'Governor' Gamble, of Missouri. We copy from that paper of August 7th: We felt much cheered, a few days ago, in announcing that the Missouri State Convention had deposed the traitor Governor, Jackson, and the seditions General Assembly of that State. The offence of the Legislature was that I had passed an unconstitutional military bill, putting the militia of the State in the hands of the traitor Governor, and compelling them to swear realtaining not the first word expressing his devotion to the Union or his determination to have discharged the duties that his States owes to the General Government. It was as frigid as an icicle, and might as well have been written by the traitor, Jackson, before the latter was ready to throw off the cloak of his treachery. But it is in his first proclamation to the people of Missouri, that Gov. Gamble really astounds and alarms a hopeful country. We have published that remarkable document — it
the State without being captured by the troops of the United States. It is further enjoined on all citizens of a suitable age to enrol themselves in military organizations, that they may take part in the defence of the State." Gov. Gamble here takes the position that the Government of the United States is a sort of highway robber, marauding in Missouri, and watching for opportunities to plunder the State. A notable Union sentiment this, and a fine compliment to Gens. Fremont, Lyon and Pope, who are in Missouri to save Gamble & Co. from the wicked conspiracies of C. F. Jackson and his confederates Gov. Gamble exhorts his loyal Union constituents to become spies and informants, and to watch those rogues, the U. S. troops And he further urges his people to enrol them into military companies and be prepared "to take part in defence of the State." So we at all have another State army, wholly independent of the United States authority, and educated by Gov. Gamble into the notion tha
greatly chagrined at the proclamation of 'Governor' Gamble, of Missouri. We copy from that paper of August 7tent. We concluded so and rejoiced accordingly. Judge Gamble, who was elected Provisional Governor, came befoe alarm, at the first demonstration he has made. Gov. Gamble's inaugural was published yesterday. It is remarirst proclamation to the people of Missouri, that Gov. Gamble really astounds and alarms a hopeful country. Wemay take part in the defence of the State." Gov. Gamble here takes the position that the Government of thFremont, Lyon and Pope, who are in Missouri to save Gamble & Co. from the wicked conspiracies of C. F. Jackson and his confederates Gov. Gamble exhorts his loyal Union constituents to become spies and informants, and to wt of the United States authority, and educated by Gov. Gamble into the notion that the United States are to be o hemp and the food that the Confederates want. Gov. Gamble's Unionism will betray all into the traitor's ban
July, 8 AD (search for this): article 16
The bogus Government in Missouri. The New York Times, one of the leading Abolition journals of the North, is greatly chagrined at the proclamation of 'Governor' Gamble, of Missouri. We copy from that paper of August 7th: We felt much cheered, a few days ago, in announcing that the Missouri State Convention had deposed the traitor Governor, Jackson, and the seditions General Assembly of that State. The offence of the Legislature was that I had passed an unconstitutional military bill, putting the militia of the State in the hands of the traitor Governor, and compelling them to swear realty to that Governor, instead of to the Constitution of the United States. The offence of the Governor was that he had openly conspired with armed enemies of the United States, and was using the militia and the treasure of the State in trying to withdraw Missouri from the Union. And further, that in the violent effort accomplish this revolution, he had been driven from the State and compel