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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 7
wing of our line of battle, instead of the right, as I then supposed The part of the battle ground upon which we entered had not been very hotly contested previous us to our arrival; but, instantly after coming up, it became and continued for hours the "r dd " part of the field. The persons who came with me I saw no more after reaching the some of the conflict Unable to find any of our Mississippi people that I knew, I was thrown with a regiment which I was afterwards told was from North Carolina--probably the 6th--which just then was making and ineffectual attempt to form on a ridge to pointblank range of a large battery of the enemy, then playing on that part of our lines. The regiment, however, fell back a little way to the left and formed in good order behind a farmhouse and the adjacent out buildings. About tois time a piece of our artillery came upon the scene at that point, and after some delay opened fire upon the enemy in beautiful style. I sat on my horse near this g
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 7
enced at Bethel, where it seems that the very stars, in their courses, fought against you iseras of the North, in that you got to fighting and staying among yourselves, even before the battle began, demoralizing your force, and thus assuring us an easy victory against the most desperate odds. That it was further abundantly evidenced in the unexampled food crops with which the good God had blessed us thus forever thwarting your expressed determination to starve us out, by blockading us from Cairo all the way round to the sea.--And, finally, I should not be surprised if some signal interposition of Davine Providence should not be exhibited in our favor here at Bull. Run to-day. All this, and more like it, I substantially said, and yet they did not slay me where I sat. The truth is, I thought I was d ned to a long and dreary imprisonment or exile at least, nd, perhaps, felt a little desperate. They heard me politely, and so far from mocking or hissing, seemed rather to like, if
Piedmont, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
e regiment to which I was attached (the Nineteenth Mississippi, Col. C. M. Mott,) was on the way from Winchester to Manassas, waiting at a railway station called Piedmont, for a train to convey it to the vicinity of the scene of action. I was on horseback, and was that day acting as Assistant Brigade Quartermaster to Maj. James Hnder of the Brigade in place of Brig. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, who was acting in place of General Johnston. Saturday morning I had ridden on, six or seven miles from Piedmont, by the dirt road, in the direction of Manassas, when Maj. Anderson requested me to go back and attend to some business in his department which he supposed had bde as light as possible, I gave my rifle and baggage to a servant and told him to await my return — not expecting to be gone more than two hours. On my return to Piedmont I was detained by Col. Mott four or five hours, and, consequently, when I started back toward Manassas I was unable to overtake either the Quartermaster's train
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 7
ety, but was still exciting, especially to the horse, who bounded into the air as if he had been struck with a fragment of Yankee iron. This shell must have been thrown at me by Sherman's Battery, then probably a mile and a half distant. Riding forward a few yards further, I perceived in a little glen or having a party of soldiers, numbering, I suppose, about forty, dressed in a uniform exactly similar to many of those worn in the Confederate service, and all armed with the improved Springfield musket. Of course, I did not dream for an instant that they were other than Southerners and Secessionists. Riding directly up to, and accosting them, a brief colloquy ensued, of which the following is the substance: "Well, boys," said I, "I believe those batteries over yonder are, for the present, a little too much for our people on the hill." "Oh, no," replied one of them, "we are carrying the day everywhere. " (And so they were up to 1½ P. M.) "Well," said I, "who are y
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 7
ed the detachment which took me prisoner were slain-- to pace! that night towards headquarter South Carolina Brigade, in whose company I found myself b vou as various places on the battle- field, and finally, about 8 o'clock in the morning Monday, we arrived at the headquarters of Gen. Evans, where we laid down on the ground, and on Yankee blankets, in the rain, and slept till we got sufficiently wet to wake us up — about 6½ or 7 o'clock. My captors belonged to a regiment of Wisconsin--the 6th, I believe. After they ran off and left me, dropping every portable thing they had, I picked up the fine military great cost of one of their officers--Lieut. Wise, I suppose, was his name, from an envelope in the pocket — which I have yet, and which (my baggage being at the Junction,) was of essential service in shielding me from the cold and rain of several succeeding night and days. Begging pardon, Messrs Editors, for having trespassed so long on your patience, I am,
United States (United States) (search for this): article 7
cing, in advance, as false and unfounded, anything in conflict with it which may have appeared in the journal, of the United States. The day before the fight, (Saturday,) the regiment to which I was attached (the Nineteenth Mississippi, Col. C. not a word was said by me (as their reporters wantonly write,) about our having "two full negro regiments" in our Confederate States Army. During this colloquy a great crowd, numbering several hundreds, gathered around me, still sitting in my if they would stop their cross questioning I would make them a compendious statement of the whole issue between the Confederate States and the United States, as I understood it, and as I believed every honest and intelligent man among them would viewUnited States, as I understood it, and as I believed every honest and intelligent man among them would view it if be were only properly enlightened. To this they assented, and I proceeded to do my best under the circumstances. Of course, I cannot here give even an outline of my remarks on that interesting and critical occasion; but this much I remember
Haymarket (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
gone more than two hours. On my return to Piedmont I was detained by Col. Mott four or five hours, and, consequently, when I started back toward Manassas I was unable to overtake either the Quartermaster's train or the servant with my arms, who, of course, despairing of my return in time for him to catch up with the train before dark, had gone on.--I rode on, however, to Haymarket, a village distant, I believe, ten miles from Manassas Junction, and somewhat nearer the battlefield. At Haymarket I stopped for the night, being completely knocked up by the fatigues of the day and of the previous march from Winchester to Piedmont Sleeping late next morning — the glorious Sunday, the 21st--late at least for a soldier, we were at breakfast about 7 o'clock, when it was announced that the battle had begun, as the quick recurring discharges of cannon were distinctly heard. It was at once proposed that a party of us, all of whom were strangers to me, should proceed to the battle-ground.
Beauregard (search for this): article 7
g and critical occasion; but this much I remember, and will not withhold: After going over the main points of Southern Scripture in reference to merely political issues, State Rights, &c., I told them frankly that, all he g they could outnumber us, we could outfight at them; that a vast majority of our people were as brave as at the head of his conquering legions, while the majority of brave men among them was probably not quite so vast; that we had the best Generals on our side — Davis, Beauregard, Johnston, Lee, Magruder, Albert Johnson, Ben McCulloch, and others — while they had only Scott, whose sands of life are nearly run, and who is altogether too slow for such a "trial of conclusions" as our Generals have instituted; and that as long as we could bring 2 ,000 men into the field, (and we can do that forever,) the question of victory or defeat is a mere question of general h p. Finally, I told them that God Almighty, the Supreme, All-wise, and ever just Ruler of the Universe, wa
John A. Scott (search for this): article 7
points of Southern Scripture in reference to merely political issues, State Rights, &c., I told them frankly that, all he g they could outnumber us, we could outfight at them; that a vast majority of our people were as brave as at the head of his conquering legions, while the majority of brave men among them was probably not quite so vast; that we had the best Generals on our side — Davis, Beauregard, Johnston, Lee, Magruder, Albert Johnson, Ben McCulloch, and others — while they had only Scott, whose sands of life are nearly run, and who is altogether too slow for such a "trial of conclusions" as our Generals have instituted; and that as long as we could bring 2 ,000 men into the field, (and we can do that forever,) the question of victory or defeat is a mere question of general h p. Finally, I told them that God Almighty, the Supreme, All-wise, and ever just Ruler of the Universe, was on our side. That this was e by the military necessities of the old Union, which, for the last
James H. Anderson (search for this): article 7
was on the way from Winchester to Manassas, waiting at a railway station called Piedmont, for a train to convey it to the vicinity of the scene of action. I was on horseback, and was that day acting as Assistant Brigade Quartermaster to Maj. James H. Anderson, of Mississippi, and also as volunteer Aid to Col. C. H. Mott, who was then acting at commander of the Brigade in place of Brig. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, who was acting in place of General Johnston. Saturday morning I had ridden on, six or seven miles from Piedmont, by the dirt road, in the direction of Manassas, when Maj. Anderson requested me to go back and attend to some business in his department which he supposed had been neglected. In order to ride as light as possible, I gave my rifle and baggage to a servant and told him to await my return — not expecting to be gone more than two hours. On my return to Piedmont I was detained by Col. Mott four or five hours, and, consequently, when I started back toward Manassas I was unab
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