hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 42 0 Browse Search
De Beauregard 26 0 Browse Search
France (France) 18 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 17 11 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Hampton (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Tyler 12 6 Browse Search
Lyon 12 6 Browse Search
Albert Sidney Johnston 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 15, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 8 total hits in 5 results.

Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 4
The wounded soldiers. We have received the following letter from E. F. Bouchelle, M. D., of Alabama, and publish it for the benefit of the suffering: Charlottesville, Va., Aug. 10, 1861. I have been for sometime visiting the sick and wounded soldiers of the memorable Manassas, and find that they are doing well in some places, at others not so well; there is a strong tendency in may cases to typhoidal fever, or in other words the fever which succeeds the wounds, as a necessary recuperative effort of nature, which assumes the character of a low, typhoid fever, destroying many lives that would, under the usual circumstances, recover. Another very singular circumstance observed, is that two-thirds of the wounded of both armies are wounded from the hips down to the feet; a great number in the knees. Those that have been early operated on by timely amputations, have done best. I don't think, as a general rule, that a sufficient number of amputations have been performed
E. F. Bouchelle (search for this): article 4
The wounded soldiers. We have received the following letter from E. F. Bouchelle, M. D., of Alabama, and publish it for the benefit of the suffering: Charlottesville, Va., Aug. 10, 1861. I have been for sometime visiting the sick and wounded soldiers of the memorable Manassas, and find that they are doing well in some places, at others not so well; there is a strong tendency in may cases to typhoidal fever, or in other words the fever which succeeds the wounds, as a necessary recuperative effort of nature, which assumes the character of a low, typhoid fever, destroying many lives that would, under the usual circumstances, recover. Another very singular circumstance observed, is that two-thirds of the wounded of both armies are wounded from the hips down to the feet; a great number in the knees. Those that have been early operated on by timely amputations, have done best. I don't think, as a general rule, that a sufficient number of amputations have been performed
irritation whom an early amputation would have saved. In some of the houses, the nurses inform me that they find it exceedingly difficult to keep maggots out of the wounds; in fact, I saw them on the bandages, and in the wounds, in a number of instances, where both nurses and surgeons had discharged their duty with commendable benevolence, patriotism and rigid care. Dr. Fairfax, a highly estimable gentleman, and an excellent surgeon, who has charge of the wounded at the University under Prof. Cabell, and surely there is a large number there — informed me that he found the flies very troublesome, depositing maggots despite of all precautions — and that he found the application of calomel the best remedy for their expulsion. I think, however, that these are serious objections to the remedy, as its local application to the skin, even, will produce constitutional effects, and (a fortiori,) much sooner when applied to a wound or denuded surface, as in this latter case it comes in immedia
y difficult to keep maggots out of the wounds; in fact, I saw them on the bandages, and in the wounds, in a number of instances, where both nurses and surgeons had discharged their duty with commendable benevolence, patriotism and rigid care. Dr. Fairfax, a highly estimable gentleman, and an excellent surgeon, who has charge of the wounded at the University under Prof. Cabell, and surely there is a large number there — informed me that he found the flies very troublesome, depositing maggots deto the skin, even, will produce constitutional effects, and (a fortiori,) much sooner when applied to a wound or denuded surface, as in this latter case it comes in immediate contact with the absorbant vessels. I suggested a lotion or wash to Dr. Fairfax, which I will here repeat, that every wounded soldier may have the benefit of it; and I want them all to know it, both in private houses and the hospitals: The best remedy against maggots, both after they have been deposited in the wound and b
August 10th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 4
The wounded soldiers. We have received the following letter from E. F. Bouchelle, M. D., of Alabama, and publish it for the benefit of the suffering: Charlottesville, Va., Aug. 10, 1861. I have been for sometime visiting the sick and wounded soldiers of the memorable Manassas, and find that they are doing well in some places, at others not so well; there is a strong tendency in may cases to typhoidal fever, or in other words the fever which succeeds the wounds, as a necessary recuperative effort of nature, which assumes the character of a low, typhoid fever, destroying many lives that would, under the usual circumstances, recover. Another very singular circumstance observed, is that two-thirds of the wounded of both armies are wounded from the hips down to the feet; a great number in the knees. Those that have been early operated on by timely amputations, have done best. I don't think, as a general rule, that a sufficient number of amputations have been performed,