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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 16, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Carlile on Moral Obligations. --In the course of a speech delivered in the United States Senate on the 30th ult., the traitor Carlile said: He was free to say if he should be so unfortunate as to be taken prisoner by the enemies of his country, and could only preserve his life by taking the oath, and if he believed it his duty to his country and family to preserve his life, then he should not regard the oath as a binding obligation, morally or legally. If we are correctly informed (says the N. O. Bulletin,) several of the United States Army officers recently captured by Gen. Van Dorn, in Texas, and released on their parole of honor not to serve in the United States Army during the present war, entertained the same idea of the binding obligation of an oath that the dishonorable Mr. Carlile does, and have assumed positions in Lincoln's army.
Carlile on Moral Obligations. --In the course of a speech delivered in the United States Senate on the 30th ult., the traitor Carlile said: He was free to say if he should be so unfortunate as to be taken prisoner by the enemies of his country, and could only preserve his life by taking the oath, and if he believed it his duty to his country and family to preserve his life, then he should not regard the oath as a binding obligation, morally or legally. If we are correctly informed (says the N. O. Bulletin,) several of the United States Army officers recently captured by Gen. Van Dorn, in Texas, and released on their parole of honor not to serve in the United States Army during the present war, entertained the same idea of the binding obligation of an oath that the dishonorable Mr. Carlile does, and have assumed positions in Lincoln's army.
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 8
Carlile on Moral Obligations. --In the course of a speech delivered in the United States Senate on the 30th ult., the traitor Carlile said: He was free to say if he should be so unfortunate as to be taken prisoner by the enemies of his country, and could only preserve his life by taking the oath, and if he believed it his duty to his country and family to preserve his life, then he should not regard the oath as a binding obligation, morally or legally. If we are correctly informed (says the N. O. Bulletin,) several of the United States Army officers recently captured by Gen. Van Dorn, in Texas, and released on their parole of honor not to serve in the United States Army during the present war, entertained the same idea of the binding obligation of an oath that the dishonorable Mr. Carlile does, and have assumed positions in Lincoln's army.
Carlile on Moral Obligations. --In the course of a speech delivered in the United States Senate on the 30th ult., the traitor Carlile said: He was free to say if he should be so unfortunate as to be taken prisoner by the enemies of his country, and could only preserve his life by taking the oath, and if he believed it his duty to his country and family to preserve his life, then he should not regard the oath as a binding obligation, morally or legally. If we are correctly informed (says the N. O. Bulletin,) several of the United States Army officers recently captured by Gen. Van Dorn, in Texas, and released on their parole of honor not to serve in the United States Army during the present war, entertained the same idea of the binding obligation of an oath that the dishonorable Mr. Carlile does, and have assumed positions in Lincoln's army.