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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Wingfield Scott (search for this): article 12
He Ought to change his name. Alexander the Great hearing that there was a man of the same name with himself in his army, and that he was a notorious coward, sent for him, and said unto him, "fight better, or change your name." Ought not old Scott to profit by this example? He lost the battle of Manassas. He confesses himself to be a great coward. Why, then, should he cling to "Winfield," a name indicative of victory? Why does he not write "Losefield" as descriptive of his present status?
James Alexander (search for this): article 12
He Ought to change his name. Alexander the Great hearing that there was a man of the same name with himself in his army, and that he was a notorious coward, sent for him, and said unto him, "fight better, or change your name." Ought not old Scott to profit by this example? He lost the battle of Manassas. He confesses himself to be a great coward. Why, then, should he cling to "Winfield," a name indicative of victory? Why does he not write "Losefield" as descriptive of his present status?