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of horror unequalled by those of the French Revolution. The Administration, therefore, decided, as I have said, not to hang any of the pirates. But within a day or two the question has been again raised in the Cabinet. At least one member of that body is in favor, as he expresses it, of discarding all squeamish nonsense, and of hanging every rebel found in arms against the Government, whether taken on the sea or land! This is undoubtedly the course that ought to be taken, if the Government regards this matter as simply an insurrection. This is the view taken of it by President Lincoln; and he, too, although he deplores the necessity of such dreadful measures, is in favor of such a course as will show to the world that we are in earnest in this matter, and that traitors found in arms against the Government must expect and receive a traitor's doom. Mr. Bates and Mr. Blair both go for extreme measures, regardless of consequences; and Mr. Smith also entertains the same views.
of horror unequalled by those of the French Revolution. The Administration, therefore, decided, as I have said, not to hang any of the pirates. But within a day or two the question has been again raised in the Cabinet. At least one member of that body is in favor, as he expresses it, of discarding all squeamish nonsense, and of hanging every rebel found in arms against the Government, whether taken on the sea or land! This is undoubtedly the course that ought to be taken, if the Government regards this matter as simply an insurrection. This is the view taken of it by President Lincoln; and he, too, although he deplores the necessity of such dreadful measures, is in favor of such a course as will show to the world that we are in earnest in this matter, and that traitors found in arms against the Government must expect and receive a traitor's doom. Mr. Bates and Mr. Blair both go for extreme measures, regardless of consequences; and Mr. Smith also entertains the same views.
of horror unequalled by those of the French Revolution. The Administration, therefore, decided, as I have said, not to hang any of the pirates. But within a day or two the question has been again raised in the Cabinet. At least one member of that body is in favor, as he expresses it, of discarding all squeamish nonsense, and of hanging every rebel found in arms against the Government, whether taken on the sea or land! This is undoubtedly the course that ought to be taken, if the Government regards this matter as simply an insurrection. This is the view taken of it by President Lincoln; and he, too, although he deplores the necessity of such dreadful measures, is in favor of such a course as will show to the world that we are in earnest in this matter, and that traitors found in arms against the Government must expect and receive a traitor's doom. Mr. Bates and Mr. Blair both go for extreme measures, regardless of consequences; and Mr. Smith also entertains the same views.
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 29
of horror unequalled by those of the French Revolution. The Administration, therefore, decided, as I have said, not to hang any of the pirates. But within a day or two the question has been again raised in the Cabinet. At least one member of that body is in favor, as he expresses it, of discarding all squeamish nonsense, and of hanging every rebel found in arms against the Government, whether taken on the sea or land! This is undoubtedly the course that ought to be taken, if the Government regards this matter as simply an insurrection. This is the view taken of it by President Lincoln; and he, too, although he deplores the necessity of such dreadful measures, is in favor of such a course as will show to the world that we are in earnest in this matter, and that traitors found in arms against the Government must expect and receive a traitor's doom. Mr. Bates and Mr. Blair both go for extreme measures, regardless of consequences; and Mr. Smith also entertains the same views.